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21

Expected: None Desired: A lot A programmer who understands the business analytics of a company or industry is much more valuable to that company than an amazing programmer who only knows how to code what he is told. My suggestion would be to learn whatever you can about the industry you are programming for. It will increase your value to employers in ...


18

There are certainly cases where it makes sense for a business analyst to understand the technology at least well enough to understand where it makes sense to question a business user about how important a particular feature would be. For example, if the business is accustomed to the behavior of a fat client application while the new application is going to ...


17

How much business and systems knowledge should a programmer have ? As much as is needed to solve the problems of your clients. In some cases, it may be minimal. However in many cases, like the one you describe, it is a lot. As @Rachel noted, the better you understand the domain, the more valuable you are to your employer/clients. How does one go ...


15

I've run into quite a few of these and what I normally do is exactly what you did, dive right in and get it done. When they come back for more, it means that their business model is working and that they should be willing to invest a little more. That's when I sit them down (typically 3rd module depending on complexity) and tell them the bad news. I will ...


12

The BA actually gets into those tiny details as that they are the ones that gather the requirements which includes asking the, "What if..." tons of times so that it is known what the system should do. The developer doesn't necessarily get knee-deep in the business process of exactly what are the steps to perform various functions and identifying all the ...


11

It's not about using acronyms at all. It's about perception. If you ask a business to rank everything 1, 2, 3, 4 or High, Medium, Low then everything becomes a high priority. You're not really explaining, in those systems, why you're asking. If you ask businesses to rank things as must have, should have, could have, would have, then you are simultaneously ...


10

Just make him a small app and get paid for it. In my experience it is compelling to invest more time at the beginning than really needed, just in case the customer wants more. But you have to weight the efford in doing it (do you get paid for it) vs. the propability that all these additional changes really will occur. The whole app might be replaced ...


7

...i'm curious as to how some of these software consulting positions with the large firms (Accenture, Deloitte, IBM, etc.) accept business grads as well as comp-sci and computer engineers? The best way to understand this is to look at the requirements for the jobs in question. In order to develop software for a client you have to first understand ...


7

Having worked both sides of this issue I have to agree with the Analyst. I have seen some spectacularly poor designs resulting from lack of understanding of the capabilities of the technology. In some cases, it has been a result of taking marketing hype as truth. In general, the problem has been generating specifications which don't match the technical ...


7

I would expect that to be the "test and release cycle". It sounds like someone inadvertently put some company-specific jargon in a job ad, though, that's not a term I've ever come across before.


7

Provide your business analyst with a data template that both of you can live with. It's not necessarily his job to do database and system interface design; it is yours.


6

There is a lot more to software than just the development. Some of it is more business oriented - requirement analysis, ROI modelling, life-cycle management, marketing and communication strategy, budgeting and project/program management, etc, etc. Large firms strive to be "one stop shops" i.e. delivering services covering all aspects of the industry, hence ...


6

If the technology that will be used is known it should be taken into consideration by analysts when creating the design. Different technologies do things differently and a design that doesn't take into account those differences is going to have problems. However, business analysts shouldn't care about what technology is used, their job is to gather business ...


6

I believe there is a point between the two lines of thought that is probably more realistic. While a high-level design might be best when kept technology agnostic, there must be a consideration of known real-world constraints and requirements that should be incorporated into the design. What level is this design? Do you have sufficient requirements? How ...


5

You are probably working in a in house IT developer shop. It is a different wold there. Companies with in house developers don't want the best programmer they want a programmer that will add the value they want to the company right now if not yesterday. They don't want to think about the business rules because they expect the developer to know them it's why ...


5

Previous answers are good and, if I'm honest, what I would probably do. That said, I'm slightly uneasy at this approach in that you are making decisions that properly belong to the customer, based on an assumption of what they want (and the desire to land the job) I can't help feeling one should do is be be honest with the customer and give them the choice: ...


5

If you don't have an assumptions section you will just have the unknown assumptions of the programmers while they were coding. You have to constantly make deliberate and unconcious assumptions when you are building something - you might as well have them written down.


4

I was hired as a consultant developer at a company I used to work for, and I did program a lot. I would interact with customers and talk to them about their needs, what they were looking for, and implement custom code for them. I was also sent on-site to help clients, advise them on how to use the products my company made, and also write custom code to show ...


4

There is no reason that all the conditions have to be one requirement. The system shall sell alcohol only to those older than 18. The system shall require proof of age to sell alcohol. The system Shall not sell alcohol to those with alcohol related problems. These are all perfectly valid requirements, and the system is not valid unless it meets all the ...


4

Passing acceptance testing is an indication that the system meets the users' requirements acceptably. As such, the requirements document is generally considered the source of truth for acceptance criteria. There will almost always be further elaboration of requirements during design. If these are truly an expansion of scope, the requirements document ...


3

Well, I don't think consulting involve any programming. I sometimes consult some small companies, and to tell you the truth, while they pay good for consulting, it doesn't involve almost any kind of programming. I just bring some reasons to persuade them that the path they've taken is kind'of right or wrong, and bring them better implementation ideas. A ...


3

Depends upon the company and the group you are working with. If you are working in a well organized software development organization then you can expect that very little system and business analysis will be expected of you beyond what might be needed to clarify your current task. If you are the sole developer or working with a small group of developers then ...


3

With only a couple of exceptions the best BAs I have worked with all started as developers. It used to be the case that practically everyone in DP/IT first worked as a programmer - but frankly the demand ramped up much faster than the supply beginning I am guessing in the late 80s with the office PC revolution. These days around my shop, BAs who used to ...


3

As the lowest common denominator, I agree with @Rachel that there shouldn't be an expectation that a programmer have sufficient business knowledge so as to be able to write up the requirement. However, we live in a fickle world full of maddening expectations, and often a developer who can translate the incompatibilities and driving forces between the ...


3

The ideal user interface would be where the user thinks a thought, and what they wanted done is simply done. Anything short of that is crippled by the technology limitations we have at our disposal, so of course the BA needs to understand what context they can design the system in.


3

Requirements are that and only that: what is the required outcome for the system in question? In this case, the System Requirements appears to be: Application A must be able to: install a new service of type 1, 2, or 3 change the service type of an existing service of type 1, 2, or 3 disconnect a service of type 1, 2, or 3 in ...


3

User Stories capture the need of a user to be able to do something, the details of which will be elaborated on during the iteration in which a team takes on that story. That is, a User Story is the basis for a discussion--it is not "Requirements" as such. So, system requirements should come up in that discussion that occurs during the iteration. Note that ...


3

"Product Owner" is a term from Scrum, which is only one form of Agile. Scrum is really designed around the notion of small teams of seven plus or minus two, who do all the development and testing of the project solution. The Team would work with a Product Owner, who owns what goes into the project and what does not. To scale Scrum, organizations have ...


3

For a use case the Actor can easily be a: User System (self-reference) System (external reference) ... (I'm sure there's others I'm not thinking of right now) The problem that you're running into is that you are assuming that an Actor can only be a User. In reality, the Actor is just the agent that triggers some sequence of events. System to System use ...


3

As described, it sounds like a design decision, not a system requirement. I think the requirement should sound like this: "The marklar depends on the user's state of residence. For users in NY, NJ ... . For users in WA, ... etc." or "The marklar depends on the user's state of residence, and is calculated according to the following table: ..."



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