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20

The only way to change is to make everyone else see the downsides of a sloppy culture and, perhaps more importantly, have management buy-in to fix it. In reality though, that doesn't happen and you won't be able to change it. That might not be the answer that you were expecting to hear, but after five years or so of trying and failing at several jobs to ...


20

I've been in very similar situations (in the aerospace and automotive industries). Don't expect to progress very far in this or subsequent meetings. Both of these situations outlasted my desire to continue fighting for improvement, but here is the best tactic I've seen so far... You say "this process has worked for 20 years", but has it really? Start by ...


18

Paid support really works best for those things that are specific to your product that will benefit from your expertise. If you are a domain expert in your own product, you are the one best qualified to be a top-notch consultant for your users. Nobody wants to pay good money for run-of-the-mill customer service or for things that I would call "common ...


17

For the specific project there's not much you can do until you find out what the client wants. However, there are some things you can do now so your team is ready to go. How are you going to handle version control? Will you do code reviews? When will the daily standup meetings be held? What are the rules? What role does everyone play? How are builds ...


12

Set up your version control system and document its configuration Set up an automated build system Set up automated Unit tests that integrate with the build system Set up a web server to serve up static content like automatically generated docs and reports from your Continuous Integration System. Set up a Continuous Integration server to run your builds and ...


12

Our production release process is a nightmare because it revolves around Clearcase. We have a change management group who executes all releases and who will only allow code into production that was taken from it. No, your process is a "nightmare" because of your change management group and your release procedures. Go ahead and replace Clearcase ...


7

You need both. If you don't know where you want to go, you're not likely to get there. But you also need to actually get started, and to take every step along the way. But as you make that transition from corporate drone to entrepreneur, you shouldn't think that you either remain an obedient servant or become an omniscient dictator. Neither is particularly ...


7

You may need to have a sit-down with co-worker and boss and explain that you what you had was a prototype and wasn't ready for clients to use. If they wanted it to be ready for clients to use, you could make those changes given enough time but please don't take the "quick and dirty" stuff and pass it along to customers. Just because something works doesn't ...


5

My internal alarm is ringing when I see the opportunity to start specifying the requirements and these items didn't take that long to finish together. While other answer provide great ways to set up an healthy environnement, be sur that one of the biggest peril is under specifications. So you might spend some time on this phase. It can be a week (full-time) ...


5

I would focus on use-cases and user-stories. I could document them, perhaps in a wiki, and give each one an ID (like UC00001). Then when I wrote unit tests and/or integration tests, I'd label them with the use case they inform. Then when I get to two unit tests that can't both pass because they're mutually exclusive, I'd throw those two use cases back at ...


5

Specific examples will impress more than abstract advantages. I think you will find most success if you can document particular examples where (a) Clearcase caused problems that took time to solve and (b) Git solves those problems. Remember that you don't need to go into technical details of why this is so (unless asked) simply show that it is; management ...


4

As mentioned in another answer, you will probably struggle to find a free version of a mainstream ERP system to use for learning. An open source system you could try out is OpenERP. A couple of books that may be of use, ERP, Making it happen. Wallace, Kremzar This covers ERP implementation from the business perspective. Operations Management. Greasley ...


4

I am a little confused as to exactly what you are trying to achieve. You don't just wake up one day and decide you want to write some BPM software - you must have a reason for doing so, and this reason is your design goal. BPM is a very wide ranging concept that covers many things - what particular aspect are you targeting? And why do you feel the need to ...


4

http://www.bpm.com/ The articles there seem like a solid start. I'd particularly recommend the "Getting Started with BPM" ones to establish the fundamentals. Key points they cover: Your first process should be a core business process that impacts how workers do their critical daily tasks. In the waterfall model, the system delivered wasn’t quite what the ...


3

You cant fix stupid. If your boss is doing things like you describe its unlikely you'll be able to change that. Especially if he's not the owner - remember, he has pressure coming from the other direction, and that direction signs his pay check. Same with your other co-workers. The best first course of action you can take is to get in the habit of ...


3

break it down: get general outline first and create a prelim design of the simple version then start adding complexities in line with business logic but keep the changes small and compatible with expected updates (but keep consistency always) (this is a top-down approach) shut the domain expert up and/or interrupt him regularly with questions/remarks ...


3

My experience working with extremely complex business logic and a domain expert is that the time of the domain expert tends to be extremely valuable, even more so in a small sized company. He is of course rattling off endless details and nuances to you because it comes naturally to him for one, and secondly because he is likely an extremely busy person. ...


3

Which process notations have you used? UML and BPMN. Which one would you recommend me for my project? Neither. Graphical business process notation gets cluttered and difficult to work with when you start digging into real details. We've evolved programming languages specifically because graphical notation is too coarse-grained to be really ...


3

It's nice to have visions, but they don't put bread on the table. In fact most often they lead to big financial losses as people end up chasing rainbows rather than creating practical products that can be sold to real customers for a decent profit in a reasonable amount of time.


2

I primarily do Java and the only thing I've heard that sounds similar to what you want is Mylyn "Mylyn makes tasks a first class part of the IDE, integrates rich and offline editing for ALM tools, and monitors your programming activity to create a "task context" that focuses your workspace and automatically links all relevant artifacts to the ...


2

If you are using the Microsoft toolset, look into Windows Workflow. It has some graphical designers and some pretty powerful features for the sort of process you are describing. I've used it in connection with Sharepoint, but you can incorporate workflow into any app.


2

The other day, a colleague told me a story of a simple test tool to allow an engineer in a lab to issue a single command to a widget, and change a variable that goes with the command. This was written 9 years ago now, and last he knew, it is still in use today. A tool that was written in a couple of hours with minimal testing to prove, in the lab, that ...


2

You're putting a lot of thought into this, but at the same time, you are only allowing yourself a narrow corridor. If you are considering PHP (and I really am not saying you should), then you must consider Symfony, Flow3, CakePHP and Codeigniter. If you are really interested in "long-run oriented solutions", then you should go for a statically typed ...


2

Here is an attempt at how I would try that. That may sound stupid for a developer, but to management, technological changes are seen as risky. "If the magic thingy already works, why take the risk to break it?" Thus, you have to turn the table. Make it more risky not to make the switch to git. At all costs, don't make it sound like it's a new toy. I ...


1

There is no "paid-support open source model". At least, there isn't much of a one. A very small number of individual people have been able to make the model work, and an even smaller number of companies. It works when the software has high value or risk profiles compared to the purchase price of its competitors. It also works when the company involved ...


1

In my experience, Most clients need work for cheap. They don't have understanding of technologies. Most clients waste time in interviewing. Much time is wasted in getting a project, waiting for client replies. It is good to work as a team, not as individual person.


1

I'd point out that part of the problem here is that you've written a quick and dirty tool in the first place. Granted, there were good reasons. Granted, it did the job. But, I've found that anything that solves a problem, will fall into the trap of a "good enough" solution, if you start passing it out. If your fellow wants it, either politely tell him it ...


1

Until decision makers no longer tollerate the consequences of the bad code and are willing to pay/change their ways to fix the problem. These are difficult decisions for small and growing companies. They don't know where to put all their efforts. There is a risk making code too robust when business rules and sometimes entire lines of business appear, ...



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