Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

81

You are going to run into programmers like this your entire career. There is nothing wrong with experimentation and learning on your own. Sure books are great. Many times the examples work in a clean environment, but if you are developer for another company there is no such thing as a clean (without interference from others) environment. It's always nice ...


58

Did he really call you stupid, or did he just disparage the code? Calling anything stupid is tactless, but that doesn't invalidate the suggestion. I think Infestus has made a valuable suggestion, and in the future you should consider his suggestions seriously. He seems to do a lot of reading, and at least in this case his opinion is well-informed. ...


49

@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner hinted at this above, I'll be more blunt: you've been charged with a expensive but useless task. I suspect the CEO is looking for irrefutable, objective evidence which will support his choice of language. The problem is that preference of language is loaded with far too many subjective and extrinsic factors for the white-paper ...


23

Some broad brush strokes to consider: Language popularity This really shouldn't matter, because popularity does not necessarily equate with productivity, expressiveness or any of the other language qualities that matter more, but this consideration often trumps all other considerations because: It's easier to find software developers in a popular ...


21

Reading a book shouldn't be blind: the author should try to convince you of the merits of his/her approach as he presents it. It's reasonable for your senior to point you to a book explaining his preferred approach, rather than asking him to explain it himself: though he should be able to explain the benefits of his preferences without relying on the book, ...


17

There are three key elements to any healthy relationship. Communication, honesty and trust. That counts for all relationships, even working relationships. You should be talking to your supervisor about these concerns. If you don't understand his reasons for advocating a certain design, then tell him that. Tell him that you haven't read the book, and that ...


14

I wouldn't necessarily dampen his current enthusiasm by telling him he's doing too much. On the other hand, people have lives outside of work, and it is unrealistic to expect this kind of sustained performance from everyone. I would keep an eye on him. If you see nascent signs of burnout, remind him that it's a marathon, not a sprint, and that other ...


6

Both systems sound so very very flawed. the newer stuff should be known to the top of the 'tree' before the trainee gets to it. In my experience.. this is way off. Juniors are the ones who research this stuff. Almost all Senior developers I have met are very relaxed in their roles and seem to be just waiting out retirement. "Oh I don't have time to ...


6

Programmers must do more than just write code; they must also have good communication skills. A "typical" job description, from Monster.com: Programmer Job Duties: Confirms project requirements by reviewing program objective, input data, and output requirements with analyst, supervisor, and client. Arranges project requirements in programming ...


6

Maybe. It all depends on "the one". My view on software engineering is similar to that of any other skilled craft and I'm a huge proponent of Software Craftsmanship movement. Just like with any other skill, if you want to get good at making software(or houses, sculptures, swords... etc), you need to practice. That's why some people will tell you, you just ...


6

In the company where you work, it probably is. This is what they require you to do. This engineer Infestus does a very poor job educating junior developers by telling them "this is written in the book, and that's why". He's not a preacher, he's an engineer, and he should be able to break it down and present the concepts so that juniors would be able to ...


5

Yes, absolutely. You will find quite fast that you indeed learn a lot from looking beyond your current field and try other things. Learning and practicing techniques and patterns used in other languages and frameworks will broaden your view and increase your ability to find solutions where other see hurdles. Note that it's not always necessary to master ...


5

There are business reasons for choosing a language, and there are engineering reasons for choosing a language, and the twain do not always meet. Throwing in academic reasons is likely to make things worse. I doubt a professor will be able to help you in the way you need. The facts about a language's ancestry and features are pretty easy to find. You ...


4

You have to gauge whether he is putting in the extra effort because he feels he has to, or because he just likes doing it. This is the essential point - when I was young and full of energy, and hadn't had the enthusiasm kicked out of me by PHBs and incompetent managers, I liked doing extra just because it was there to be done! If you get it wrong, and start ...


4

IMHO, there are 2 aspects here, which you should deal with separately: The fact that the guy is being a jerk, calling you names and such simply because he can (he's senior, you're not, if either of you complains about the other one, he'll get the benefit of the doubt) is simply bully-like behavior, and just bad. Try not to stoop to his level with this. ...


4

Those familiar with the wonderful essay "How to write unmaintainable code" will remember: If you must use descriptive variable and function names, misspell them. By misspelling in some function and variable names, and spelling it correctly in others (such as SetPintleOpening SetPintalClosing) we effectively negate the use of grep or IDE search ...


4

Having a mentor is great, especially when you are first starting out, but even better is to be a member of a large dev team that uses source control and enforces code reviews. In my career, I've spent a lot of time being the resident expert in my niche. Nothing helped me to grow as a developer more than the time I spent on a large dev team (more than a ...


4

I have been developing for .NET for almost 10 years. I still ask questions every single day. I still read every single day. I still question my assumptions and seek out better solutions every single day. Searching out proven solutions is better than working things through and reinventing the wheel. There is already too much of that going on in software ...


3

Start with management, ask the dev team how they would regrade the management staff. Once they've gone through that process you can apply the same thinking to the dev team without them kicking up a fuss about fairness. As for the concept that you need to re-skill continually, this is a fallacy. Do those VB6ers still have VB6 code to work on? If the answer ...


3

No, though I'd see this as an indicator of pride in their work with may be lacking. What do you guys think of this? I'd wonder if the person was rushed in producing this code or if there is some reason for not having the pride to make sure things are spelled correctly. Part of the big challenge in English is that some words can be really close in ...


3

Reading books and blog posts is very helpful in programming. There are some books, which all developers should read. However books are not the only source to learn different programming concepts and technologies. Nowadays on-demand video based training is getting very popular. You can check Pluralsight, which provides high quality training to ...


3

Following books blindly is a bad idea, but there's a difference between following a book exactly and following it blindly. When you're trying to understand stuff in a book, it generally is appropriate to follow it exactly at first, while you're getting a feel for what it's trying to teach you. Odds are that you still won't understand everything when you're ...


3

Experiment on your own and learn all that you can. After you read enough books, you're going to discover that there are multiple books on particular subjects and they may contradict one another. Try the one you think is best and try both if you have the time or want to compare/contrast. Dealing with your boss is an entirely different subject and approach. ...


3

How fundamental to good development is BDD? It is not fundamental to it. Proof: There were good developers and good development practices before "they" thought of Behaviour Driven Design. Ergo, it cannot be fundamental to good development. A good developer is not someone who learns and practices just one development methodology. And certainly ...


3

Yes, but with only 2 years experience why would you want to? Testing is a good career choice- better than development as so many people consider test to be a "lesser" role and steer away from it. Hence there are more opportunities,especially if you're good at your job. And good at your job means getting skilled in many aspects of development and ...


3

Identify and cost the shortcomings inherent to your existing development process as $A. Identify the cost of switching to any other development process as $B. If $A is less then $B, stop. If your known shortcomings outweigh the cost of change (and that is a big if!) then analyse the shortcomings in detail and start looking for a language/development ...


2

The thing about books is that they - mostly - pass through revisions, which have a better chance to spot bad practices and misconceptions. Also, the "big names" are experienced people who rely on being good to earn extra money selling books, thus, there are some minimal quality assurances about what they say. That said, reading books, papers, and other ...


2

You should ask him what in particular is wrong with your method. If he is unable to answer it clearly, you might be pretty sure that it is just a common guy who likes to feel superior.


2

Just don't be repetitive or beg? What would have lead them to offer you a face to face interview I would guess is the perception that you were honest and could string a sentence together well enough. Presumably you answered some questions about your field of expertise well and if they did their background checks they'll have looked you up and seen that you ...


2

It sounds like you are maybe correct in your assumption that they are looking for someone keen, willing to learn, fast learner etc. Maybe they have seen enough in you that you are worth the second interview at least. I'm not sure there is anything you can do to guarantee getting the job. Maybe talking about some personal projects, or learning that you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible