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9

I'm not sure if it's the best degree for the job, but whenever you're developing software, a degree in computer science will come in handy. You don't need it and I know many good self-taught programmers, but it does help a whole lot to know what you're doing and why some things go wrong even though the code looks totally normal.


8

If its just a certificate there is not problem, as these only contain the public key. The problem is if the private key is publicised as is the case with for example id.rsa


8

First off, if you're really looking to get a degree so that you can develop mobile apps, then look for Software Engineering programs (especially ones that offer concentrations in mobile or web applications). A Computer Science degree isn't a bad start, but you'll likely get a lot of math and computational theory that won't help you when writing applications ...


7

To me "Unknown Publisher" is a red flag. It's one more bit of "polish" on your application. There's a story about a famous rock band that would give the venue a long list of requirements - things like how many electrical connections they needed, the size of the stage, placement of lights, distance to dressing rooms, etc. Included in that list was a ...


7

As @Björn noted, Java certifications are for persons, not companies. What you can advertise is "100% of our developers are certified Java experts" in the first case. In the second case, it may be better to put it like "some/most/all of our lead developers are certified Java experts".


5

The warranty is kind of misleading, actually, because it's not issued to the purchaser of the certificate -- it's issued to the users of the site. So say you give your credit card details to a website that's verified by a CA that offers a warranty and the (fraudulent) site takes money from you, then you can use the warranty to claim back the money you lost. ...


5

You dont need a degree. Especially since it sounds like you already have some programming experience. Write some apps, publish them, get some users - thats a far quicker path to a good job than a new degree because you'd have concrete examples of completed projects in your portfolio. Plus who knows, maybe you'll make enough off one of the apps that you ...


5

Yes, you'll need a code signing or Authenticode certificate. (It looks like not all CA vendors call it an Authenticode certificate; GoDaddy, for example, simply calls it a driver signing certificate.) As far as I know, with one major exception (see below), there is very little difference between CA vendors, and I'd generally just recommend using whoever's ...


4

A certificate signing request contains information about the distinguished name of the individual who generated it along with the public key. The standard form of the request that on sees is a Base64 encoded request that contains the above mentioned distinguished name, the public key and the method that was used to generate the public key. The RSA public ...


4

I switched my career from neuroscience to programming one year ago. Currently working as a web-app developer. Here is the thing. You are competing with people who've been doing it since a very young age. Programming is becoming like music in that sense. It is insanely hard to catch up. The degree and career itself is many-fold harder then psychology. ...


4

If you're talking about this one here: link to oracle web-site, I can say that only stuff related to time and passing rate has changed. But the exam content is still the same (JavaSE6). I'm studying to take the exam and the following ones and I'm using the following material: SCJP Sun Certified Programmer for Java 6 - by far the best book regarding the ...


3

Software Engineering or CS would be the most useful degrees to already have, but neither would be a great use of your time/money now in pursuing the specific goal of becoming a mobile app developer. Spend some money on reference books and a few representative devices to test with, spend your time (lots of it) focusing on learning everything you need. In ...


3

The certificate is personal and not transferrable to the company. I guess you could still say that your company is Java certified but it would be incorrect. A company certificate such as ISO 9001 would require an audit of your companys business which the Java programmer certificates does not entail.


3

If you just want to be allowed to install a driver on a windows machine, your CA use shouldn't matter (unless the CA isn't trusted by Microsoft). However, only VeriSign certificates are supported as a means of identifying your organization to Microsoft for features like Windows Error Reporting and Windows Hardware Certification. E.g., the Manage Your ...


3

No, there's no personal information or information about your hardware configuration stored within the CSR (certificate signing request). The CSR is part of an asymmetric encryption key, ie. it is the public portion of a public and private key. Essentially, both keys are just a bunch of random* numbers that enable Public key encryption. Have a look at ...


3

Take a look at the SmartCard API for Java This specification describes the Java Smart Card I/O API defined by JSR 268. It defines a Java API for communication with Smart Cards using ISO/IEC 7816-4 APDUs. It thereby allows Java applications to interact with applications running on the Smart Card, to store and retrieve data on the card, etc. The API ...


2

In my experience, programming certifications are not interesting to companies whose product is software. Those companies are much more interested in general problem-solving ability than in deep knowledge of some specific technology. They expect developers to be able to learn specific technologies as needed.


1

Just from what I've seen with the software I distribute, a code signing certificate doesn't affect customer behavior much, particularly if they are downloading directly from your site and not from a 3rd party. The customer has purposesly gone to your site, possibly even purchased your softare - they aren't not going to install your software because of an ...


1

I could be wrong about this, but as far as I know without resorting to implementing crypto in JavaScript or using some manner of plugin you cannot do exactly what you are attempting. There is something close that is unpopular, but fairly well supported: Client Side Certificates The general idea is that the client has a certificate in their keychain and ...


1

I can think of an easy legitimate reason: suppose I write a program to do an offline version of the SSL Labs server test. A good test suite for that program would include various certificates with different problems and some configuration to use them for testing. E.g. it checks for the Debian weak key problem, so you'd want a certificate with a Debian weak ...


1

Microsoft has just brought out a certificate exam for Windows Phone development, passing that and putting a small app that shows your skills on the app store would get your CV to stand out. However you must also be able to prove you can program, as the exams only cover knowing the API not programming skills. So contributing to an open source project ...



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