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95

The main purpose of certifications is to make money for the certifying body. Having said that, I think certifications are more important the earlier on in your career you are. As a hiring manager, I never use certifications or the lack thereof to filter potential employees, but I do think some companies may look for these as proof that you know what you are ...


56

I'd actually go so far as to say a "certification" could be a net negative on a resume applying to a software shop. At Microsoft, Google, Amazon, or startups run by folks from companies like those, there's definitely the attitude that if you need a certficate, then you can't really program, and if you actually can program, then you don't waste your time on ...


41

No. Certs are not equivalent to a degree at all. They may almost be worth it for sysadmin, network engineer, or generalized IT work. But they subtract from a programmer's resume. (That's at least, you know, my view). But you don't need a degree. Work on serious projects that are bound to impress other programmers and you will have clearly demonstrated your ...


35

Certifications will only look good on a resume if the person reading it would be predisposed to trusting the certification and the authorities that offer it. The PHP community as a whole has not accepted certification as a sign of competence or knowledge... especially not the former. Only Zend's certifications are worthwhile, and maybe not even then. Zend ...


33

There will be both kind of companies: Ones who don't care for certifications. Companies like FogCreek don't even believe in knowing specific languages. (Knowing may give you points but that's not the criteria.) Ones who do care for certifications. These companies may believe in certificates or their clients may. Most likely, the company may give you ...


21

As an 8 year MVP; I can share my experiences with you. Most (including myself) MVPs are not MVPs by effort - we do what we do; and being an MVP was a nice benefit. It's more of a reward, than a goal. Now, that isn't to say that aiming to be an MVP is a bad idea. The problem with that approach is it seems more like "work". If the idea of using your personal ...


18

Difference between MCPD, MCAD, MCA/MCM MCPD is thing that you should go for being a .Net Developer Path is: MCP > MCTS > MCPD There is no specific certification for Silverlight. you need to do certifications for WPF + WCF instead. MCTS: .NET Framework 3.5 Windows Communication Foundation Applications Exam 70-536 and Exam 70-503 MCTS: .NET Framework 3.5 ...


17

I took BrainBench tests for C# and Java some years ago and thought they were completely useless. I scored well, but the questions were largely about details of syntax and the class library. Incompetent programmers can memorize this information and pass these tests. Competent programmers learn the features of the language (e.g. C# has delegates, Java has ...


17

Have them submit their bid as a GitHub pull request. Note: this obviously requires private repositories. If that requirement is too strong, just have them submit something else.


16

I'm going to address this from the perspective of a potential hiring manager. Note that I typically operate in and around organizations for whom certifications, and even college degrees, are not a priority -- if you can show me code, demonstrate good development practices, can adapt to different methodologies, and are generally a good, creative team member ...


16

Transcender's Joshua Hester reported (about the beta version of this test): 71-515 (TS: Web Applications Development with .NET Framework 4): A warning for old-school Web developers — this is not your father’s ASP anymore, so forget what you learned from the 70-562 (TS: 3.5, ASP.NET Application Development). The 4.0 exam focuses heavily on ASP.NET MVC 2, ...


16

Based on available information, I believe that Software Engineering is already a formal profession. It may not be widely accepted as such, but it is meeting the generally accepted criteria for the characteristics of a profession. From Wikipedia's article on Profession: There is considerable agreement about defining the characteristic features of a ...


15

I'm not a recruiter, but so far I have an impression that certification courses give you piss poor overview on how to drag and drop items in IDE, at the same time stealing actual coding time and costing a whole lot of money. The only good part from certification courses I noticed, was where instructor sidestepped and told about some gotchas he's experienced ...


15

Certification is not going to take you anywhere, except adding more lines on your resume. If you want to become software architect on java side, (which in my opinion is wrong goal, instead simply say software architect with strong programming skills or something like that), then you need sound experience in Java technology.


15

"Certification" programs are very different than more traditional forms of education, such as advance high school classes or college courses. They emphasize specific, narrow fields of study over broad, fundamental understanding, as well as favor rapidity over thoroughness. Such courses generally teach you one specific system in detail, such as a particular ...


13

Some companies are a Microsoft Certified Partner, which requires the company to employ a minimum number of certified employees (MCP). In that sense, it definitely can help. Outside of that however, I would say that it doesn't really help. Putting work into OS projects can be much more beneficial to one's career, especially if said OS project takes off (or ...


13

I found the official SCJP study guide very helpful. (The exam has been rebranded since the guide was written) http://www.amazon.com/SCJP-Certified-Programmer-Java-310-065/dp/0071591060 If you follow the instructions in the study guide and go through each section doing the exercises and do the practice exams, you are very likely to succeed. It took me 3 ...


12

Spend the time getting work. Apply for jobs. Spend the time to learn how to write notable cover letters and take the time learning how to interview well. You might get shut down a few times, you might land an awesome job the first time. With a bachelors and masters degree, you've done your share of study - it's time for you to apply it. However, if you feel ...


12

Whenever I interview people I usually ignore their certifications. In my experience certifications are not a good barometer for usable knowledge. My questions during the interview will usually let me know if the person knows the information needed AND can apply it to real world problems.


12

The irony of certifications in the Java space is that it is actually the lowest level ones which I think are the most useful. I have the old Sun Certified Java Programmer for example (the lowest one you can have). While it doesn't really teach you anything that any decent programmer couldn't learn by doing Java tutorials for a few weeks, it does act as a ...


11

The IEEE has been working on establishing a similar credential for software engineers, but I don't know that it is getting any traction. Note that in the US at least, you can't get the PE certification simply by taking an exam. You have to have a degree in an engineering discipline from an accredited school. You can then take a written exam to become an ...


11

Microsoft is going through the process of rebranding all of their exams. They do this from time to time so MCSE and MCSD are replacing the MCITP and MCPD branches respectively. They are doing this to try to increase the value of the certifications again. If you are looking at doing any certifications soon, focus on the newer paths. Microsoft handed out a ...


11

Certifications have minimal value even for entry level jobs. Their primary value is getting past human resources buzzword filters. While on a personal level, studying for a certification can be a useful way to discipline yourself when picking up a new technology, no one is going to be offered a senior development position on the basis of a certification. ...


10

I have been developing in .NET for over 6 years and for many of those years I have done as some here have suggested, which is to "learn what you need to get the job done". This has been a necessity for much of the time, however, I find this approach sorely lacking when one wants to grow and become a "good" developer". I agree with you this lack of ...


10

I would recommend reading Steve McConnell's Professional Software Development. It has a section on professionalism in the industry, which includes a chapter on certifying and licensing software engineers. The book also discusses other topics, such as individual and organizational professionalism. It's a pretty good read, and exerpts are available online, ...


9

Starting in April 2013, there will be a PE exam for Software Engineering. The IEEE Computer Society, IEEE-USA, and National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) partnered to develop a PE exam specifically for software engineers. According to the IEEE news release, registration will open mid-December 2012 and the IEEE will be publishing ...


9

Jump all over the paid for 5 day class, but review the book first so you can ask questions to get explanations of concepts you may not fully grasp. Take advantage of this. You'll need to study the book and "DO ALL THE EXERCISES" especially if they are not part of your job. I develop on SQL Server a lot, but do little DBA work. I'm more fluent in writing ...


9

MVPs should have deep technical knowledge, and should share that knowledge. 20 years ago I was very active on Usenet, even writing a book about it, and wrote a newsreader as a sample app in another book. Yet by the time this century dawned I had nothing to do with Usenet any more. I was awarded MVP because of my books, blogging, public speaking, founding ...


9

I currently hold the IEEE Certified Software Development Associate (CSDA) certificate, and I'll be sitting for the CSDP exam when I'm eligible (I still need ~2-3 years of experience). Like any certificate, it's only proof that you know certain topics, by the book form. They don't really say much about how you'll perform on-the-job. Your past work history ...



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