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27

The short answer to "What's the state of Dart?" is: it's in Technology Preview. That's a special way of saying, "we launched early so we can open source everything and work in the open." "Technology preview" also means "we're not even in Alpha yet, we have a lot of work to do, but there's enough there for you to play with and give feedback." Internet time ...


21

I'm a full time web-developer, and I use Chrome's Developer Tools on a daily basis. I have only ever touched Firebug a few times for debugging in Firefox. For the times I have used Firebug however, I felt as though the functionality was much the same. I played around with a number of different areas and found everything to be as intuitive and functional as ...


17

There's already a web-based terminal emulator that offers a remote command-line: http://servermonitoringhq.com/blog/the_ultimate_web_based_ide There are also two different VNC implementations in JavaScript, in case you need to access a graphical desktop remotely: http://github.com/kanaka/noVNC http://guacamole.sourceforge.net/ I expect remote desktop ...


14

There are 4 places a browser can leak memory: The web page In modern browsers this is fully up to the web developer. Garbage-collected environments don't collect memory that is still being referenced to, and there are a lot of ways to keep referencing memory without meaning to (e.g. create a closure to attach as an event handler and accidentally include a ...


11

Developer Omniboxes for Chrome - awesome You want instant documentation in almost every language? Then these are the plugins for you. This answer has been updated to include the links provided by apsillers - many thanks! Originally this was Development and Coding Search


11

The poster boy for HTML5 apps, LinkedIn went native early 2013. In the interview in VentureBeat they explain why. I think this is the part most relevant to your question: Prasad said performance issues weren’t causing crashes or making the app run slowly. What he did say shows that HTML5 for the mobile web still has a bright future — but only if ...


10

Here is the best answer I found on the 'Net, Memory Leakage in Internet Explorer - revisited, and a snippet to explain why: The above pattern will leak due to the circular reference created between a DOM node and a JS element. Since the JScript garbage collector is a mark and sweep GC, you may think that it would handle circular references. And ...


9

Not until you can have a full development environment available online, including access to a test platform. That means it depends on the kind of software you want. System programming will be hard to provide online while web development might be easier. So in all cases, I think just getting "real" computers will be cheaper (in infrastructure setup) than ...


9

It's simply to completely separate failure of each different tab and plugin. When one fail, whatever the way it fails, only this one will crash. The monitoring process will just report that it failed and will be able to reload it. C++ have shared memory by default and an exception system which makes easy to crash the whole application if one part isn't ...


8

You can't measure programming language age in "internet years". In fact, you can't measure any actual technology in internet years. All you can really measure in internet years are hypes, but hypes don't reflect reality. Dart is public since 3 months now. Compare that to the "fresh" and "hot" techs in the field, like CoffeeScript or Node.js, which are ...


8

For a rough guess: http://www.ohloh.net/p/chrome/estimated_cost ($86 mio., I'm not sure if everything included was done by Google and I haven't checked if that measure includes V8) http://www.ohloh.net/p/v8-js/estimated_cost ($13 mio. , 100% paid by Google)


8

Chrome Developer Tools may substitute vanilla FireBug, but the strength of FireBug lies with so many extension being available for it.


7

Firefox has used PDF.js as the default PDF viewer since Firefox 19. When you view a PDF in Firefox (provided you haven't changed your browser's PDF settings), you are viewing an HTML rendering of the document. You can't "view source" because there was no HTML source downloaded, but you can "inspect element" because the document you're viewing in-browser is ...


6

You can find all informations about API and extension structure in http://code.google.com/chrome/extensions/index.html website. You can write extensions using only HTML, CSS, JS. There are also some sample extensions in this site. Moreover, you can unzip any extension that you want to check source codes.


5

If the extension is already free and you didn't note that there is a "free period" when it was originally posted then you might be better off updating it to be donation-ware and providing some sort of link to a "tip jar" that people can donate a buck or two towards. Likewise, if there is an improvement you could make to the extension that would be a major ...


5

Dart is still in technical preview. At the moment the language specification has the version 0.0.6, a 0.0.7 is expected somewhere this week. It is far from "complete". There are several example in the repository: http://www.dartlang.org/samples/index.html Here is one view on what is better in syntax terms than in JavaScript: ...


5

I try not to be too much of a conspiracy theorist but I could see this as being retaliation for Oracle's copyright/patent infringement lawsuit against Google over Android. I doubt most regular users will even notice since Java applets are basically dead anyway on consumer web sites. I prefer the approach of Firefox, which disables known vulnerable Java ...


5

If you look at the hardware, it's got specs of typical netbook: Intel® ATOM Processor N570 2GB Standard System Memory 16GB SSD (mSATA) Even if you'd "jailbreak" it somehow, low specs would prevent you from running any kind of developing environment on the netbook itself. That leaves you it the option of development "in the clouds", which ...


5

A lack of a Javascript standard library is a horrible inhibitor. There are great frameworks like jQuery, Dojo, YUI, to name a few, but all of them are solely focused on the presentation layer and XHR. Do you want configurable logging, cryptographic tools, graph algorithms, UUID generators, Maps, Sets, Trees, templates, dependency management, date ...


4

I think we are at the start of a market shift towards this sort of programming (i.e. everything is web-based). Web programmers (as in, those who build websites :)) will be the first to benefit. There are already tools like Kodingen which are surprisingly good for prototyping and working on PHP/Python/Ruby. Once these sorts of sites can adequately work with ...


4

Understanding Chrome's behavior is easiest to see in a site that supports both http and https. If you open Developer Tools and view this image, then Chrome reports 27.1k if the image is cached and 257 bytes if it is not. You can clear your cache inside Developer Tools by right-clicking on the area on the bottom of the screen (for example next to ...


4

No, there aren't any popular licenses that do that. But this is largely because a license is NOT required to allow simple use; licenses are a stipulated contract, wherein you give someone permission to use your property (the software) in exchange for some combination of renumeration and behavior. The GPL, for instance, is a trade of "you must license ...


4

The MIT license is a very permissive license. You can do just about anything with software that is covered by the MIT license except for removing the copyright and license information. So, yes you can create a GUI front-end for moment.js and you are not even restricted in your choice of license for the front-end.


3

Google has a lot of cash to spend throwing things at the wall and seeing what sticks. Nothing wrong with that, it is very nice to see innovation no matter how interesting or weird. But for enterprises to adopt such things it takes time, lawyers get involved, and just because something looks "cool" does not immediately translate into widespread adoption.


3

I know this is an old question, but I didn't see this important fact mentioned anywhere: Chrome allows you to add a folder on your file system as a local Web application. Once you do that, files in that folder no longer need to be accessed through the file: protocol -- they become accessible through the chrome-extension:// protocol, e.g., ...


3

Firebug still has the edge in a couple ways Network traffic debug. Much easier to dig into ajax request/responses and look at headers and data in the log in Firebug Chrome (at least, latest chrome dev) has an annoying habit of hanging on to cached files even when I do a shift-F5 reload and an updated file is served. Firebug seems to reliably reload cache ...


3

Firebug Lite is the Chrome analog to Firebug for Firefox. It's an excellent complement to the Web Developer toolbar already mentioned.


3

The Web Developer extension is a straight-across port of the Firefox web developer toolbar. Also see the "view selection source" extension. Once I found those things, I happily fired Firefox. By the way, the Chrome Dev Tools are excellent. They're not prone to just occasionally breaking and not telling you anything about anything, as Firebug often seems to ...


3

This isn't really news; there have been many projects with similar goals. As a closest example I can point you to Adobe's Alchemy. It was never really 'hot', but it is similar in concept. It was a step in the 'near-native speed' direction, though it was still far. An important difference is Alchemy compiled C++ to Flash bytecode, and Flash support, while ...


2

You're absolutely wrong about extensions being written in C++. Google Chrome extensions are written using same tech stack as normal web apps. They use HTML, CSS and JS. Config files are JSON. The difference is, that in the extension you get access to Chrome API.



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