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Even if you learn the basics of VB, performing a code review while not knowing all of the features of the language will not enable you to detect the usage of insecure features in the language. Suppose that you weren't aware that the input() function in Python 2 actually evaluated the input before returning it, in order to make it easier to parse non-string ...


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I was once asked to audit a project that was being undertaken by a subcontractor and appeared to have serious performance problems. I fairly quickly established that the critical factor was a single Perl module. I had never come across Perl before and we had no-one in the organisation who knew it, so I set about trying to understand it myself. I never got as ...


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That depends on what the goal of the review is; i.e. what you mean by effective. You will still likely be able to detect some problems. If you're all they got to review with and they're just hoping that you taking a look over it helps some and possibly catches something, then sure. Many concepts of structure are similar between languages. One especially is ...


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This could be a win-win situation. I would go as far as to say that you could be an especially valuable reviewer because you are a Python virgin who has not been tainted by the Curse of Knowledge. Think of it this way: if code is clear enough that even a Python virgin can understand it, then it must be good code. The parts that you have trouble ...


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They may have asked you to review Python code precisely because you don't know Python. There's a management theory that it's useful to have a "fool" on a team. I'm not calling you a bad name :) The idea is that a team may suffer from group think and develop tunnel vision. One way to break out of this is to include someone on the team who the other team ...


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You should definitely not be the only reviewer, but there are lots of good reasons for you to be one of the reviewers. Not knowing the language is not much of a hindrance for a lot of questions that need answering in a code review. As an example, I'm one of the top 20 answerers in the C# tag on this site, and I've not so much as compiled hello world in C#. ...


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General advice Here's the bottom line, in my opinion: If you don't know the language well enough to know the features and common idioms, you are probably not going to contribute much to the review. If you want to learn the language's features and idioms, you could participate in the review. Your focus should be observing the idioms and asking questions ...


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As a regular contributor over at Code Review Stack Exchange, I encounter a lot of questions suffering from Language-agnostic issues, for example: Formatting, indentation Scope Loops Type operations and the list goes on. However, while I don't need to know the language, I can still review those issues / points. A few of our top users have top answers in ...


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A few observations: 1) If you are an experienced developer, you will pick up Python (or at least as much as you need to know), just by working with it. It will be a case of "learning by doing." It will be hard at first, but will get easier as you pick up the language. Think of this as an opportunity to learn another language (people often learn "foreign" ...


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Code reviews (in addition to actually looking for flaws) are a good introduction from one team member to others for the code being added or changed. If you are an experienced developer, you should be able to read through enough to mostly understand what is going on. Look at a code review from a team leader's point of view: there is someone there who ...


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Code review is not about searching for variables with invalid spelling and wrong formatting. If you use code review to find such things, then stop wasting your time and use a tool. Code review is about improving design and detecting common mistakes by a novice programmers. Since I program in C++, and I don't know Python well enough, I wouldn't dare to ...


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Any sense? Yes. Even if you know nothing about the semantics of a programming language, you can still read characters and notice inconsistent formatting, missing comments, badly chosen identifiers, obvious duplication etc. Much sense, or enough sense to repay the cost of your time? I'm not sure. This depends on your position, the importance of code reviews ...


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The git program suite can (and should) be used in command line. So type git diff in your terminal. And of course you can use github as a repository and use git commands in your terminal. I'm doing that every day. Try git help in your terminal. (I believe, but I am not sure, that the Github limits you are mentioning are mostly relevant for the Github ...



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