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68

Is it meant to show that this is a collaborative project - you're welcome to add improvements? Yes: you don't have the right to push a commit directly at their repo. But you do have the possibility to fork their repo, which makes it your repo, and push commit from there, preparing pull requests.


47

He is 100% right that you must provide enough information to make the bug reproducible - otherwise there is no chance to find out if any fix he provides will really work. But - he is IMHO 100% wrong that this must be in form of a unit test. If you can describe a test scenario in a way so he can reproduce the failure (at least with a high probability in a ...


35

If possible, may be spend some time to check if this defect can be reproduced by putting some sleep or block in your application code. But do not spend too much time. As this issue is due to multi-theading (and also as you observed), it's occurrence will be rare. My advice is not to sweat over this too much. Continue your work. Whenever you come across ...


35

The "Fork me on Github" badge is meant to show that it the project you are granted the right to contribute to the project or use it as a starting point for your own project. It kinda shows that "it's a collaborative project and that you're welcome to add improvements." It allows you to play around with the code or make a spin-off of the same project ...


31

Remove code-ownership from the team. Spread the workload. Do code-reviews. Organise knowledge transfer sessions, wait a few sessions and then ask them to do a presentation on their area. It is, of course, imperative that if you're not the manager then you have your manager's backing, but if everyone on a team is regularly sharing information, there are only ...


31

Is he right is probably a question that can't really be answered without knowing your company. However, he certainly isn't being very helpful. I would raise the bug with him (which you've done), if it is causing an issue with your project then I would raise it as a blocker with your project manager and make it very clear that you've raised the bug with ...


30

I believe that Gerald Weinberg was referring to this exact type of person when he commented in The Psychology of Computer Programming (paraphrased because I don't have the book in front of me), If you notice a programmer trying to make himself indispensable, fire him immediately. 25 years later when he reissued the book, he commented that no other piece of ...


29

It sounds to me like you have a dysfunctional team with a cowboy culture and you're trying to figure out what the root cause is. You are proposing a hypothesis that maybe developers don't respect test because of some sort of implicit hierarchy or length of service or some other factor, but you're not necessarily presenting evidence for the case, you're ...


29

You can't really enforce a TDD (test first) approach on an open source project where patches can be submitted by the general public. What you can enforce is that all patches must have a set of test cases for the fixes included in the patch and that those test cases, as well as all the existing test cases, must pass. You can enforce this by only giving ...


26

There is no "start from scratch in a collaborative way" (unless, you're all starting as a team). Linus once put it in a way that always remained stuck in my head. Nobody should start to undertake a large project. You start with a small trivial project, and you should never expect it to get large. If you do, you'll just overdesign and generally think ...


23

As a member of our company's QA team, I frequently get entirely unenthusiastic feedback from developers in their responses to test results in our agile, web-based software-as-a-service shop. That's because: Our product owners are vacant: acceptance testing doesn't exist, and user stories usually are only one sentence long, and don't provide the ...


20

On the flip side, your solo-developer skills are getting sharper every day. You say this is your dream job. If you aren't looking to move to a different job, why worry about the skills that less-optimal jobs require? You can't have all of your skills maximized at the same time. Throw yourself fully into the problems you face in your current job, and gain ...


19

If you design your application properly, with adequate separation of presentation and content, you can bring in your web designer, who can provide you with the needed CSS and graphics, and it shouldn't matter what language you develop the backend in.


18

I would say YES! Two quick reasons for it: 1) If code is in production, you cannot assume that it is correct. Any change elsewhere in the system can introduce bugs. I think it is very important that code be checked regularly. This way, refactoring is done on a regular basis, keeping the code neat and "more" correct (up to date is probably bettter). 2) ...


18

Even if you're pretty sure that this is a "fundamental design flaw," remember that you're an outsider. It could be in there for a good reason. Or, depending on how old the project is, it could have been put in there for what was a good reason at the time and now it's still around for historical reasons. Instead of "blasting this on the mailing list," try ...


16

The Scrum team is self organized so there can be somebody who is little bit more dominant and other ask him for his ideas about tasks they are working on but that dominance must be under control. What you can do: Motivate others to be independent but collaborative - this can be best achieved if you cooperate with their boss and HR who will set some ...


15

I tried starting several projects over the number of years. They ALL failed. The main things I got out of it were: Do all of the work yourself. Everything. Just keep programming and doing it. It sucks no one is helping you but that's how it goes. but also Get involved with the community and make occasional post. Like progress every month or so. Tell ...


15

It is a lot easier for a lone wolf to get accustomed to a new pack than it is to take any other wolf out of the pack and expect it to survive. The Lone Wolf is already tough as nails and proved it by surviving with no support. Not everybody is cut out to be a Lone Wolf. The biggest problems a Lone Wolf faces while adjusting to a new pack are small in ...


15

Imagine you use your favorite text editor, and after some time you find that you would really love some feature to be implemented (like non-blocking Save file option). After thinking that for the eleventh time you decide to write one by yourself. After you find the github page of this project you have two options: Download the source code, modify it and ...


14

Presumably, the reason for this question is because you feel that the team is somehow under-performing because of this dominant person. Perhaps because the rest of the team aren't contributing 100% because, well, what's the point? As a manager, if you are, it's your responsibility to make sure that all of your employees understand what their roles are. ...


13

Nobody should start to undertake a large project. You start with a small trivial project, and you should never expect it to get large. If you do, you'll just overdesign and generally think it's more important than it is likely at that stage. Or worse - you might be scared away by the sheer size of the work you envision. So start small, and think ...


13

Aside from the foster collaboration side of the issue, from a business perspective it will enhance and strengthen GitHub's traffic, user base and market position. So there is a little bit of a business strategy associated with it too. Personally I don't mind this because GitHub provides a valuable service to the open source community.


12

Standard disclaimers apply: we're making an engineering solution to a social problem. However, this is a project hygiene issue, so it's a bit like saying toilets are an engineering solution to a social problem. Have a job hand off the RSS feed from Hudson. Count the number of tests in the Hudson report. If it diminishes, sound an alarm. Have an auto-da-fe' ...


12

Since it has already been discussed in other answers why pair programming isn't a solution for you, I will discuss what we have currently experimented with, and are satisfied with the results. In my view what you can do to increase collaboration is to have two people together on each project. Each of them works on a different part of the project, but ...


11

I tried that too - the "collaborative design" - when I started making games. The truth is, very few people want to work on design, even if you start with a blank page; they want you to give them explicit, clear and simple tasks they can do without getting too involved. Those who do like designing often have their own projects and just won't work on yours. ...


11

Give them what they want - assign them all the maintenance work and tasks that only he/she has the knowledge to do. No, they can't do new work because no-one else can do these other very important maintenance jobs. Yes, the new hires are getting the fun work and playing with the shiny new toys but you must do these very difficult, high priority and ...


10

Some remarks: WHAT IS NOT RM I will start out with explaining some properties of Requirements Management because I all too often am in situations where people think they are doing some kind of Requirements Management using Sharepoint, documents, spreadsheets and are doing all kinds of stuff but basically have no clue what Requirements are and have no clue ...


10

Andrew Kazyrevich's presentation is an excellent guide to agile development in distributed development teams. The main suggestions are: Group chats & frequent calls Desktop sharing, pair programming Continuous integration Unit tests Work items tracking (TFS, JIRA etc) Short iterations Daily sync between teams through standups etc Travelling Organising ...


10

This reminds of this article from Rands in Repose. I think you need to figure out why this guy is hoarding information. Job security (like the article about The Fez) is a big one. But so is insecurity. Or just that he likes this sort of work and wants it all to himself, or feels some intense sense of ownership about a particular area. Or is ...



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