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If all you did was run the translation tool over the sources, you have no claim to copyright on the translated version because no creative work on your part went into it. As the original author will probably not be supporting the C# version, it is a good idea to mention that you are responsible for the C# version. You could do this like so: Copyright ...


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I propose a header like this, which keeps the original copyright notice intact (IMO a must) while making clear that contacting the original author doesn't make much sense: Original Java Version, see http://github.com/originaljavalib: Copyright (c) 2014 Original Author <original@email.address> C# Version, translated using foobartool: Copyright (c) ...


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Creative works, like books, software, images, etc., are always protected by copyright, even if there is no explicit claim to copyright on them. The default copyright "license" is that only the original author has the right to distribute and/or modify the work. If something can be released into the public domain depends on the jurisdiction. Some ...


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Yes, at least in the US and in all EU member states, copyright exists by default and rights to use the work are automatically reserved either to its author or their employer (if the work is written as part of their obligations to the employer). In the specific case of examples in a text book, tutorial, or other similar document, you could argue (unless the ...


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You need to provide him with a license to use your code. The Apache license should suffice. It provide liberal redistribution provisions, while preserving the original copyrights of all contributors, and doesn't contain a "copyleft" provision. Copyleft means roughly that the entity using your code must open-source their code under the same license; ...



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