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1

The first rule of contracts is this: If you aren't comfortable signing something, DON'T SIGN IT. The second rule of contracts is this: If you aren't comfortable signing something without running it past your attorney first, RUN IT PAST YOUR ATTORNEY FIRST. The third rule of contracts is this: If your attorney is not an expert on the things you need to run ...


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I'm not a lawyer, so this should not to be considered definitive legal advice. You don't mention if there are license issues with the old code etc. So I'll assume they are proprietary. In general, all code, trademarks and IP would belong to the company A. That is what you were basically paid to do there. The knowledge remains yours, but may be subject to a ...


0

Both code and system design are subject to their own claims of copyright. And if you're intimately familiar with someone else's work, even a clean-room defense might not hold up in court. The simple fact is that there is no good easy answer to "how close can my hobby be to my work before I cross the line." Even if we switch the topic to something slightly ...


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Even if you did not copy code between the two projects - at least not intentionally - if your employer gets to know about the issue, he might impute this to you. And can you be 100% sure you did not copy anything unintentionally? Given someone runs a compare tool on both source codes, can you be sure he will not find parts for which it might be debatable ...


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Ideas can not be copyrighted. Only specific implementations of an idea fall under copyright. But ideas can be patented. Patents on software are not valid in all jurisdictions, so when the idea happens to be patented you might still be able to distribute your software in some parts of the world but not others.


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The MIT license allows relicensing of the material and does not require that it be under the MIT license. Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject ...


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If you create you program so that it loads the image at run-time (it is not linked): the user of the program must be able to change the image (customisation), if not then it is linked. Then the program should not be affected, it would be like an image viewer, it is not affected by the images that it views. I am not a lawyer. Please read the licence, and ...


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The basic question is: does your code, or the creation of it, in any way rely on that particular image. If you somehow derived your code from the image, then your code would be a derived work and you would have to publish your code under the CC-BY-SA license. However, and this is more usual, if the image is just something that gets displayed in the context ...



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