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16

In your contract, you should specify an explicit list of supported browsers. This will save you a lot of trouble, if later the customer complains that the page looks broken on his stone-age Windows XP notebook with IE6. (Read what happened to this guy.) Since you use libraries, the intersection of their browser compatibility lists (jQuery, Bootstrap) is ...


10

I'd attempt to enlist the basic clues over browsers which provide the visual differences, based on my own experience (and efforts) in that direction: The fonts. The browser uses fonts (via the font-family css property) to display text on the page. Most of these fonts are coming from the operating system, so here is a short list of what can go wrong with ...


8

There are so many reasons why this will never happen, it's not even funny. Competition is what drives innovation. If there were only one platform that everyone had to use for everything, it would almost certainly be awful. And no, you can't just start your own and improve it until it takes over the world; after a certain point of market penetration has ...


7

It's exactly like if you were asking why are there multiple browsers: wouldn't it be easier to have just one, globally adopted browser? Different companies build different browsers because they believe their browser is either the best one or provides features other browsers don't have. Different browsers sometimes need different rendering engines in ...


5

HTML5 and Javascript is the only option if you must have your game playable in a browser, and be 100% cross platform such that it'll work on otherwise closed platforms like the iPad (in the iPad browser). There's ways to obfuscate the client side code so that it isn't easy to steal, and there's other tricks that can be used to prevent outright theft. As a ...


5

As a client, I would expect the website to be compatible with the "Top 5", i.e. Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari and IE8+. As a freelancer, my opinion vary depending on the budget (unless the initial requirements specify explicitly the compatibility, in which case the question doesn't exist in the first place). If the customer is one of those who don't have ...


4

According to Wikipedia, "JScript" in IE is based on the same scripting engine as JScript in Windows Scripting Host. So generally, the approach to use the WSH / CScript for unit testing of JScript functions targeting at IE is fine. You should, however, make sure that the IE version (or the JS version which is supported in the related IE versions) matches the ...


3

HTML5 and Javascript is the only viable tool to create a truly cross-platform game. To ensure it cannot be stolen, ensure the gameplay relies on your service - something that would be difficult to replicate. For example, many multi-player online games currently out there now may have a client that you can download. Some people create private servers for ...


3

In the beginning, there were standards. Then, every browser decided to interpret them differently, add new features, and just plain forget the standard. Unfortunately, coding against all these browsers is a headache. Most of the normal layout will "just work," but fancy things (HTML5, CSS3, etc.) will not work in older versions of IE and probably doesn't ...


2

A front end would get the user input and then write to the pickit2 using these command line interfaces. This is basically your answer, but You need a Web Exposed front End. That means a web-server running on the same machine as the USB Device. This way it's Server side code - Local to the USB Device controlling the hardware. (The answers in you ...


2

The first consideration is that different versions of the same browser may have different rendering backend versions (Webkit in the case of Safari). A look at wikipedia's Safari version history shows that 5.1.7 is using webkit version 534.57.2. Meanwhile Mac OSX Safari is running 7.0 for OS 10.9 and 6.1 for the latest version on 10.8. Realize that Apple ...


1

I'm not sure why it wouldn't work in a given environment but it works in a Chrome console. Let's walk through it: a=[]; a is defined without a var declaration so it implicitly becomes a member of the global object which in browsers is the window object. This wouldn't work in strict mode (look for 'use strict'; - could be double-quoted), which would throw ...


1

In layman's words: Standards already exist. WC3 specifications are standard enough. Standards don't mean there would be only one implementation. Each implementation can have different bugs and particularities, and each one is more or less successful in implementing the standard. You cannot have a single implementation that runs in all operating systems. ...


1

A working approach is to classify the browsers as the BBC did in BBC Browser Support Standards. I use these classes: + supported (≥5%) o partially supported (≥2%) - not supported ● tested by me The customer gets a chart with browsers, versions and marketshare, with each entry marked according to the legend above. I test only with the newest version of ...


1

I would suggest writing a Javascript Lhogho interpreter or a compiler to Javascript for embedding in browsers- processing.js or Dart use these strategies to get their language into browsers. For instance, if you implement a Lhogho compiler using LLVM, you can use emscripten to turn LLVM bytecode into Javascript. Thus, you could write a preprocessor that ...


1

The 'stealability' issue has been done to death in various game programming forums; the essence is that the only way to secure your code is not to distribute it at all - which means you need to keep a considerable portion of the code on the server, such that the client-side code by itself is useless. If it is more effort to reconstruct the server-side ...



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