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122

There was once a question around here that contained this kind of information, and the piece that stuck with me the most was don't touch their keyboard In short, tell your junior how to accomplish what they are trying to do, but do not do it for them. But in addition to that, here are some other tips: Encourage Google (or any other search tool). If you ...


75

Being an Indian, I can speak about India. The issue is about the culture here, the mindset of the people. Since childhood, we are trained to follow the process, trade the safe path, get into high paying professions like engineering, medicine, business administration, etc. Innovation, exploration, entreprenuership is still not so common here. Most people ...


69

The answer: Money I don't care what the actual reason is. Money MUST be at the root of all of your reasoning, especially when dealing with management. If we both sat in a room for 2 hours, we could come up with dozens of reasons why it is better to have multiple environments. Here's the problem: If the reasons are not based on money, then none of them ...


41

As a Japanese person myself, I'll admit that there are a lot of cultural factors that make countries like Japan less competitive in the software industry. One problem is that most Japanese companies devote significantly more resources to marketing than a typical US company would. Anything that doesn't produce immediate value gets shot down by managers, ...


36

I have worked for large US Retail Companies in the U.S from India . The US team that I interacted with knew exactly what they want. As discussed in the other post , Indians "show almost religious adherence to policies and procedures, but nearly complete lack of insight into the problem that was supposed to be solved" . There are instances where the guys ...


36

IT'S HARD BUT NOT IMPOSSIBLE. Unless you live in paradise. For specific steps you could take I wholeheartedly recommend picking up a copy of Fearless Change First get management backing. If you don't nothing else will make up for this one.. If the upper level is all 'The deadline is yesterday..', 'Working weekends for the next 3 months', 'Why are you ...


32

I think it should be encouraged but not required; seniors shouldn't be assigned to juniors or anything like that, or else you'll end up in Dilbert-land. The "mentor-mentee" relationship requires some level of friendship at its core, as well as a healthy dose of MUTUAL respect. You don't get that by just telling to people to go off and "ment".


31

The idea of being dependent on an IDE to understand code at such a basic level seems anathema. It is not a question of understanding your code: given sufficient time, you can always locate the right variable with a basic text editor or even in a printout. As far as understanding the code goes, the IDE dependency absolutely does not exist. Locating your ...


29

Other than a few anomalies, a map of technical innovation looks a lot like a GDP map. My conclusion is that innovation follows money. As economies grow in India and China, I'm sure we can expect more innovation from them. This makes sense. Large economies tend to have: Extra money to invest and speculate on innovation Laws that protect said investments ...


29

Japanese here. I don't think Japanese programmers really comprehend the work that westerners are doing half the time. We're in our own little Galapagos bubble, disturbingly oblivious to the rest of the world. Aside from software made for the sciences (simulation systems, engineering tools etc.), I don't think we're too interested in academics. We seem to ...


27

Make it so that's impossible to actually release anything without fixing the tests. Fail the build if any tests fail. Fail the build if any tests are ignored. Fail the build if test coverage goes below a certain level (so people can't just delete tests to work around it). Use the CI server to do your release builds, and only allow builds from the server's ...


23

I have around 4 yrs experience in professional software development. I have worked with mainly European developers Germans/ Spanish/ Italians etc. What I found was like anywhere else there are good guys and there are not so good guys. The thing that I found most strikingly different from developers in India is that these guys try to excel in what they do, ...


22

Visual Studio is so convenient that after working with it for a while it is difficult to use a different IDE. It has a lot of handy tools and a bunch of plugins available, so practically it has every feature you would need. On the other hand, whatever language you learn, it is recommended to use command line at the beginning, so you can better understand ...


21

I have about 4 years of experience, and I can tell you from my experience as a junior developer what I wish I had in terms of mentoring. It seems that you are actually describing the type of developer I was when I started :) Essentially you want to encourage them to learn. Some people think that after they are done with college, they don't have to read ...


20

I know that doesn't directly answer your question, but I still feel this is worth more than a comment: When you do a job interview, you're interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Break the habit of seeing an interview as something you crawl to on your belly pleading for them to offer you something. They checkout you, but you checkout them ...


20

should it be part of the culture that senior developers are paired with junior developers as mentors? Yes. organic and spontaneous, i.e. not required, but allowed to develop without artificial encouragement I won't happen often enough to actually help anyone. Folks with existing relationships in the organizations will be perceived as cliques or ...


18

Pakistani here... I have around 7 years of experience and most of this time, I have been working with guys in US. I have worked Both in: off-shore outsourcing model and in Pakistan Branch of US Company's model. I have one feeling that I would like to share. The guys from US are honest and like honesty ( I have experience with people from US only, so ...


18

Not every top programmer is a top teacher. I would recommend to make the training by somebody who can explain and who has an overview on the 'environment' of your company (technical things, but also organizational like contacts).


17

No, programmers are not, in themselves a subculture. There isn't a sense of belonging shared among programmers as a group, or really any of the elements of a shared identity. However -- and this is a big "however" -- a not-insignificant number of programmers are members of hacker culture. Hackers have a shared identity, shared rituals/holiday, shared ...


14

Listen to the team, management, stakeholders and listen for clues. They are likely feeling pain in a number of areas which Agile directly addresses. Stick to suggestions that can directly alleviate those pains. "You can't heal what you can't feel" -- so to speak. This takes a LONG freaking time, but building trust is of utmost importance. With past ...


14

Look closely at the product you'll create. I work for a good ethical boss but I really dislike the industry that we are in. I wish I would have thought about that before accepting the position. I am now trying to transition away from it but most companies don't understand the niche enough to evaluate my work.


14

Single Point of Failure By not having a development or staging environment you have a Single Point of Failure for those legacy applications. Management will hear you if you describe the legacy applications in those terms. You need to be able to pitch your message in sound bytes that makes sense to them. Take the "Programmer Speak" out of the discussion and ...


13

Don't settle for one word answers It's ridiculous to try and make an informed decision based on the employer using "Agile" or "SVN". Ask questions that are your minimum criteria for working at a place, but get them involved in a discussion about it. Ask to hang out with/work with/pair with a programmer for an hour. Ask for a walk through of a typical ...


12

From Bangladesh. From my point of view, the differences are- Technology: West is always ahead of us in technology. Anything comes to this part of the world almost 2 years later than west in terms of adaptation. For example, still we have not started using .net 4(not the framework, but the features) for production environment. This may will be done ...


11

I'd consider myself part of the Real-Time Systems group. There are some 'Old School' characteristics but with less focus on CS, more on hardware. The archetype: Has expert knowledge of 'C' Has an original copy of K&R Writes in other languages as if they were just an alternate syntax for 'C' Can predict the assembler output from their code. Can ...


11

Korean here. IMHO, There are lots of computer programmers here but Koreans mainly don't provide outsourcing for western countries. Job categories relating programming varies but the majority of programmers work for: Game companies (online game industry is quite big) Internet search company (you know what? Google is not the leading company here) Product ...


11

If you're European or American, you may find collaborating with Indian developers difficult. This is exactly because of the cultural differences. One should understand, "differences" is not a metaphor for "bad work". Here are some key aspects you may consider useful. The list below is not only a guideline on how to understand them. You should also act in a ...


10

I am not from China but my race is Chinese. I personally think that in Chinese culture, the quote "The nail that sticks up gets hammered down" holds true, discouraging innovation even from childhood altogether.



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