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66

The answer: Money I don't care what the actual reason is. Money MUST be at the root of all of your reasoning, especially when dealing with management. If we both sat in a room for 2 hours, we could come up with dozens of reasons why it is better to have multiple environments. Here's the problem: If the reasons are not based on money, then none of them ...


41

As a Japanese person myself, I'll admit that there are a lot of cultural factors that make countries like Japan less competitive in the software industry. One problem is that most Japanese companies devote significantly more resources to marketing than a typical US company would. Anything that doesn't produce immediate value gets shot down by managers, ...


30

The idea of being dependent on an IDE to understand code at such a basic level seems anathema. It is not a question of understanding your code: given sufficient time, you can always locate the right variable with a basic text editor or even in a printout. As far as understanding the code goes, the IDE dependency absolutely does not exist. Locating your ...


29

Other than a few anomalies, a map of technical innovation looks a lot like a GDP map. My conclusion is that innovation follows money. As economies grow in India and China, I'm sure we can expect more innovation from them. This makes sense. Large economies tend to have: Extra money to invest and speculate on innovation Laws that protect said investments ...


27

Make it so that's impossible to actually release anything without fixing the tests. Fail the build if any tests fail. Fail the build if any tests are ignored. Fail the build if test coverage goes below a certain level (so people can't just delete tests to work around it). Use the CI server to do your release builds, and only allow builds from the server's ...


20

I know that doesn't directly answer your question, but I still feel this is worth more than a comment: When you do a job interview, you're interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Break the habit of seeing an interview as something you crawl to on your belly pleading for them to offer you something. They checkout you, but you checkout them ...


20

Visual Studio is so convenient that after working with it for a while it is difficult to use a different IDE. It has a lot of handy tools and a bunch of plugins available, so practically it has every feature you would need. On the other hand, whatever language you learn, it is recommended to use command line at the beginning, so you can better understand ...


17

No, programmers are not, in themselves a subculture. There isn't a sense of belonging shared among programmers as a group, or really any of the elements of a shared identity. However -- and this is a big "however" -- a not-insignificant number of programmers are members of hacker culture. Hackers have a shared identity, shared rituals/holiday, shared ...


14

Single Point of Failure By not having a development or staging environment you have a Single Point of Failure for those legacy applications. Management will hear you if you describe the legacy applications in those terms. You need to be able to pitch your message in sound bytes that makes sense to them. Take the "Programmer Speak" out of the discussion and ...


11

I'd consider myself part of the Real-Time Systems group. There are some 'Old School' characteristics but with less focus on CS, more on hardware. The archetype: Has expert knowledge of 'C' Has an original copy of K&R Writes in other languages as if they were just an alternate syntax for 'C' Can predict the assembler output from their code. Can ...


10

Believe this was originally posted in phrack: The Hacker Manifesto by +++The Mentor+++ Written January 8, 1986 Another one got caught today, it's all over the papers. "Teenager Arrested in Computer >Crime Scandal", "Hacker Arrested after Bank Tampering"... Damn kids. They're all alike. But did you, in your three-piece psychology and ...


10

A few questions and suggestions: How are you measuring your output? How are you measuring the quality of your output? Are you able to extend your software easily? It's always easy to say that 'We got more stuff done in the past', but without some sort of measurement (including a longer term cost e.g. The quality & extendsibility factors) you don't ...


10

Units tests that fail are not the problem. They are a symptom. The real problem is in the culture. You need to tread gently: here be dragons. You cannot change the culture by yourself, and being the squeaky wheel will, in the end, make you an outcast. Literally. I suggest that if you try to find a senior person to champion the cause and lead the way. If ...


9

A key problem relating to the maintenance of legacy systems is the lack of people who a) are up to speed on those systems and b) willing to continue maintaining them. I recently asked a question along similar lines regarding whether younger programmers were interested in mainframes at all. The consensus leaned towards no. Maintaining legacy systems is ...


9

I had this situation at a previous company. The senior developers, which were only a few, were mentoring an increasing number of junior developers to the point where they could not do the other tasks assigned to them. After a while the senior developers brought it up with our manager and it was decided that the developers who were somewhere in between junior ...


9

If you're European or American, you may find collaborating with Indian developers difficult. This is exactly because of the cultural differences. One should understand, "differences" is not a metaphor for "bad work". Here are some key aspects you may consider useful. The list below is not only a guideline on how to understand them. You should also act in a ...


8

All excellent; Hackers (already mentioned) by Levy is probably the best though. The Fugitive Game: Online with Kevin Mitnick The Cuckoo's Egg: Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer Espionage Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet CYBERPUNK: ...


8

Most businesses are already ignorant of technical debt, and don't even realize things are bad until it literally collapses around them and sends them into bankruptcy (if it ever gets to that point). I've actually seen that happen, and it wasn't pretty; what made it worse was the fact I repeatedly tried to make the business owners aware of the mounting ...


8

Start giving her small projects with well-laid out requirements, and don't hold her hand through the process. See how she does. At the end of it ask yourself, Is her project working? Was her project done in a timely fashion? Was her work easy to understand? Was her work easy to maintain? If the answers are yes, then she is doing great. She might need to ...


8

Many Python programmers prefer a text editor approach to coding, using something like Sublime Text 2 or vim, where it's all about the code, plus command line tools and direct access and manipulation of folders and files. That's great, but it misses the point of the VS IDE. The point of an IDE like VS is rapid development support via strong code tools ...


7

There's a hacker definition, you should read it: The Jargon File, having a long history as the accepted lexicon of hacker vocabulary and culture, is the most authoritative source on the subject. A person who enjoys exploring the details of programmable systems and how to stretch their capabilities, as opposed to most users, who prefer to learn only the ...


7

A Hacker is a programmer who sees what he does as an art and a craft. A developer is someone who codes for food. Hackers create things and share them. They find fascination Developer follow a spec written by a "Product Manager" and deliver it to their boss, after if passes "Quality Assurance".


7

I view a Hacker as being different from a Programmer. To me, a Hacker is someone who works to either decompile or break into existing software and use it in a way its not meant to be used. I think it is viewed negatively because you are basically doing something that the original developers of the software didn't mean for you to do. In constrast, a ...


7

The Hacker Crackdown: Law and Disorder on the Electronic Frontier by Bruce Sterling tells the story of the 'meeting' of law enforcement and the cracker/phreaker subculture of the 1990s. Also, it describes in detail the Secret Service raid on Steve Jackson Games. That little incident almost put SJG out of business, all for a role-playing supplement (not, as ...


7

Really interesting question. My personal opinion is that it's one that's asked far too often and really holds no water whatsoever. Script kiddies (and companies that hire them) let the language of choice dictate their status amongst the echelons of "programmers". Good engineers couldn't care less about the language of choice, but concentrate on solving the ...


7

Look at this from another angle. What kinds of skills and knowledge are you wanting to have transferred amongst the programmers here? If the senior programmers are doing most of the real, important work doesn't this maintain a bit of isolation in terms of who knows which system? Getting the juniors in to know the system so that they can be backups for the ...


7

I'm reiterating some of the things that have been said already but I have two views. Business: As a business, you want productivity and lower risks. Although senior developers are doing the bulk of the work, you want them to transfer their knowledge of the system down which lowers risk. Productivity wouldn't be affected that much because you need to give ...


7

It sounds like you have all the "right" arguments already in place. Instead, you are experiencing a "red-herring", if you will. Or, "chasing the carrot" management really has no time and interest in hearing me out until there is a critical issue That's what I consider to be the real problem. In my experience, if a company has sub-par development ...



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