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I would suggest the following implementation. If the program is initially started create an encrypted and authenticated file containing either a timestamp or counter to have a starting value. It is important not to use the basic user displayed and changeable time/clock, because otherwise your customer could just set the system time into the past. When you ...


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"secure data on a typical computer". From your comments it's clear your victims are not using "typical computers" but are slaves to an irrational IT department which you're a part of. The only way to do what you want is not to store the data on the computer at all, but to store it on another computer somewhere on the network that your users have no access ...


1

I think you are confusing the issue by using lambda expressions in the structure. The expression lambda:5 is neither a list nor a number. It is a function. So the data structure in your example is not a tree of numbers, since one of the leaves is a function rather than a number. But disregarding the lambda, the expression [1, 2, 3, 4] is a list, and also a ...


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The difference between using plist, xml etc, and SQL whether raw or as one of the persistence options in Core Data is that the non-SQL solutions will load the entire persisted document into memory while SQL will only load what is needed at the moment. In your case, it seems like you have so little data that SQL is over kill. You could use a plist generated ...


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This heavily depends on definition of list and tree. Mathematically list doesn't mean anything and tree is just special subset of a graph. Inferring from your question, your teacher's definition of tree is nested lists. In which case, list of nesting depth of 0 is still a tree. So abc = [1, 2, 3, 4] Is a tree. In this case, the list is subset of tree. ...


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In the distant past, I would have suggested using the registry (as opposed to an INI file). These days, I would lean toward file-based storage of settings and configuration. The user-changeable parts of the settings should be persisted using the Isolated Storage API.


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A good starting point is Jeff Atwood's article: Was The Windows Registry a Good Idea? It gives a lot of good reasons not to use the registry. Among them: The registry is a single point of failure. That's why every single registry editing tip you'll ever find starts with a big fat screaming disclaimer about how you can break your computer with ...


2

I would suggest that the Windows Registry is best left to Windows itself to play with. Parts of it are inaccessible to regular users. Parts of it are inaccessible to certain types of application (32-bit processes running on 64-bit versions of Windows). It's a completely proprietary storage mechanism, which can change, without warning, with any upgrade ...


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I suggest you record the data point values as they come and timestamp them. timestamp point value 1436285231 A 0 1436285231 B 2 1436285232 A 2 ... ... ... You will be accumulating 270 Megabytes per 60 hours of data. If I got my estimates correct :) ((((250*32bits)*100ms)*36000ms)*60hrs) (not including timestamp and any other ...


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Depending on the frequency with which queries may be made against the data, I would suggest: Storing the data in a compressed format; and decompressing the data prior to querying. Alternatively, if queries are too frequent for the above: store the data in uncompressed format; and compress data older than 60 hours at a frequency of your choosing.



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