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Here are two other options. Instead of pushing to an intermediate repository, have the repository you push to be the directory for the live site. In there, you can simply create a post-update hook that calls git checkout HEAD. This way, the repository is stored only once. A second option, if you cannot change where you push to, is to use git archive. ...


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"git clone" has a couple of options that might help: "git clone --local" tries to save space by hardlinking files if you are cloning a repository on the same machine "git clone --shared" points your cloned repository over the where you cloned it from (on the same machine) and avoids copying objects over. There is a serious warning around this, read "man ...


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I am already using Jenkins for .Net apps and TFS. Add required configuration in your project and transformation & check-in the code. Get the latest from TFS (use TFS Plug-in) Build the Project (use MSBuild Plug-in). you can publish the code from Msbuild using command line arguments. Sync the code from publish location to destination using msdeploy.exe ...


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Using Nuget for library dependencies goes a long way toward dependency declaration and isolation. The packages.config associated to each project can be read as a dependency declaration. If those package references are marked 'private', they are bundled into the bin folder of your build outputs, and are presumably bundled for deployment. This avoids the ...


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Well, Views in ASP.NET MVC are not compiled by default as part of the build process, so they remain as plain text on the server, exactly as they appear on your local. For example, if you have a view with something like: @{ Model.FirstName } Then if you open up that View file (*.cshtml) on the server, that is exactly what you will see. And changing it ...



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