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1

This is a CI issue, not a SCM one. In Jenkins I assume you have a set of jobs that are looking at a particular SVN URL (eg trunk). You can edit these to point to a different url such as the current tag, or you can create a new set that mirror the trunk jobs but have a different repo url. Jenkins lets you group these in views to keep the display neat. You ...


0

There doesn't seem to be. But Bamboo, which we're upgrading to from Jenkins, will automatically build and deploy a branch (any branch it finds) when it has activity. Set it up to do a clean deploy and you automatically have the tests run on the one that has activity, which by definition is the one we're testing currently.


0

I totally agree with those who say that code generation is fine as long as you never have to edit (preferably, never have to look at) the generated code. If we can accept that the generated code is approximately the same number of lines as hand written, and if we can say that it is bug free, then number of lines which might potentially contain bugs has ...


3

I think it worth completing the answers above with a quote from Alan J. Perlis, from the foreword of the well-known MIT book "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs", commonly called "SICP" : Every computer program is a model, hatched in the mind, of a real or mental process. These processes, arising from human experience and thought, are ...


3

First of all, you have a human resources problem. If you want your experienced developers to stay, you need to give them a certain amount of greenfield work. Programmers can handle quite a bit of maintenance work if they also have a separate outlet for their creative urge to work on something new. Many programmers handle this on their own with hobby ...


9

I think your summary have over-simplified the blog post somewhat. :p I'm going to pick out three sentences, which I think is crucial as to explaining why code became... lava. The code gen system had somewhat broken down after Bruce had left. None of the remaining team really understood how it worked, so it was easier just to modify the code by hand. ...


5

Several ideas. Although I am not very sure how generally applicable they are. First, in a lot of articles that reference this anti-pattern, the first advice is to resist the urge. One way to resist the urge is to understand the Dunning Kruger effect, and to spend time exploring whether the urge to refactor could have been influenced by the lack of ...


2

If you have time to spare to refactor code, then you should spend it DRYing the code rather than homogenising it. Trying to get all developers in a team to do things the same way is not the problem to solve. The problem is that everyone has a different style in which they can think about code the most logically - that's what you want to optimise - give ...


4

Code style is indeed very important for overall readability, and part of code style means being consistent with said style, even to the extent of respecting the original intentions of the coder that created it or completely redoing it entirely. However, refactoring code is notoriously difficult, and even moreso with projects that have had many project ...


2

Of course cpu cache affects boot time, since CPU cache affects the processor performance. BTW the boot procedure often lasts several seconds, and that is significant enough for the cache (both instructions and data cache) to be important. A cache line is often 64 bytes. A cache size is a few megabytes. It can be mostly filled in some millions cycles (e.g. a ...


0

As with most programming problems, it depends, in my opinion. This issue is so intrinsic to creative work, that you should not forget that failures are going to happen, and that's O.K.. Programming is a wicked problem, and you usually don't know the right solution to the problem until you've already solved it. However, there's a host of local, specific ...


4

Anything that is a clear indication at all times (not just a splash screen, for instance) when running the application. For WinForm applications, that could be appending "Test" onto the title bar where you have the application name. Another common and more obvious indicator could be the use of colors. A certain window color for production (that you want ...



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