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7

Just as you can create a patch for a text (source) file, you can create a patch for a binary file as well. You are effectively just noting what changed between two files (that's called delta encoding). For example, if the app contains many resources, then those don't usually change for smaller updates, and only the executable code itself needs to be ...


7

On Windows there's a mechanism to have the OS alert you when there's a change to a 'watched' directory structure - FindFirstChangeNotification(). When that indicates a file has changed, an application can then go about comparing files in the changed directory to find the actual files that have changed by looking at size, modified date, hash, etc. This (as ...


6

You want a program that can display differences and navigate between them quickly and easily. If you're using it with a VCS, especially a DVCS like Mercurial, you'll want built-in merge support as well. I'd recommend Beyond Compare. It's intuitive and easy to use, they've got versions for Windows and Linux, and the Pro version (which doesn't cost all that ...


5

The Patience Diff algorithm is designed to address this, insofar as it is possible to do so with unannotated text. From that article: [Patience Diff] only considers lines that are (a) common to both files, and (b) appear only once in each file. This means that most lines containing a single brace or a new line are ignored, but distinctive lines like a ...


4

It does indeed look like it is possible (link to Beyond Compare makers site outlining how) Here are the steps from that link that are specific to Beyond Compare and TFS: Diff In Visual Studio Choose Options from the Tools menu. Expand Source Control in the treeview. Click Visual Studio Team Foundation Server in the treeview. Click the Configure User ...


3

Because usually, diffs are created to be able to compare any file, not only hierarchical-organized source code or data. Because in order to obtain a tree from a source code, one needs to parse it first. Reading lines - every app can do that. Being able to parse C++, Ada, Java, COBOL, Haskell and hundreds of programming languages and non-programming ...


3

I believe that it's an ad-hoc expression to describe the algorithm used by rsync which is based primarily on a rolling hash. It is an extremely fast way to compute diffs, but works in blocks and doesn't handle smaller changes optimally.


2

Ultimately to compare files you need to compare every byte - how else would you notice a single byte change? In reality you read blocks of bytes and compute a hash value, you then check against a list of hashes. A good example is "rsync" As far as I know dropbox only dedupes entire files, so will compute a hash of the entire file to check fro the same ...


2

WinMerge can diff compare any file(s) or folder(s) and generate a report (Tools > Generate Report) of differences in various formats (including HTML and CSV). You can generate a report add your own comments into the results. Run the report at the file level to get a colored diff compare. Ultimately, the best method does depend on your tools (which you ...


2

Search is your friend :-) How do I configure TFS to work with various merge tools Here is a direct link to the blog


2

For me personally, I've used two different programs, kdiff3 and p4merge. I believe they both run off the unix diff. In my limited experience, you can't really go wrong with either of these diff programs as they have always produced identical results for me. The main factor is personal preference. The program kdiff3 is more configurable, but I prefer ...


1

Well, in the first place I could argue that creating a new procedure1 that does what procedure2 did, with the same signature, is begging for trouble. Even were procedure1 to be the most natural name for the new procedure, you ought to differentiate it at the name level, to prevent confusion down the line. On a change of this import, the procedure1 name ...


1

Here are some options you might want to consider. Some diff tools have an option to input regular expressions as part of the comparison process and some, I believe, have active people in the forums tweaking the expressions for a given language. Write your own diff tool that compares the syntax and tweak the code. I started this but you spend more time ...


1

I'm a fan of Meld. I never thought I'd move to a gui diff util until Meld came along. It's simple, supports diffing many things (revisions, directories, files, etc), can do two-way or three-way diffs, and makes manually merging files a breeze.



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