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90

"Now orders, without discussion, have come down that everyone is to switch to Eclipse." I think that this is the real red flag. Your team is the expert on software development and the one to be affected by the decision, and yet you did not get to say a word in the discussion that resulted in this order? It sounds like over-managing by pointy-haired ...


77

I currently work at a place where a standard code format is enforced and the code is automatically formatted when saving the file, just like you are about to do. As a new member of the company I found that the common formatting rules gave me a warm and fuzzy feeling that "these guys know what they are doing", so I couldn't be happier. ;) As a related side ...


63

I work with Intellij (9.0.4 Ultimate) and Eclipse (Helios) every day and Intellij beats Eclipse every time. How? Because Intellij indexes the world and everything just works intuitively. I can navigate around my code base much, much faster in Intellij. F3 (type definition) works on everything - Java, JavaScript, XML, XSD, Android, Spring contexts. ...


63

It is reasonable that when you working together on a common project, that on every workstation you have all the tools available to edit/build/debug your software, and that the core tools for doing about 90% of the development are known to everyone in the team. That goal is harder to achieve if your team is growing and everyone uses his personal favorite ...


37

Every professional software developer will prefer to adopt a (good) standard rather than get into evangelical wars over style, for the very reasons you have outlined. Many software developers wage evangelical wars...... Depending on your position within the team and the team dynamics, you may decide that winning the war is not possible. In this case, it ...


30

Emacs and Vi still have a place. They are ubiquitously available in Unix and Unix-like environments, and can be installed on most other popular platforms. They are popular and stable, so learning them once pays off over the long run. They run over a text terminal, so you can use them in telnet and ssh sessions. They provide editing modes and syntax ...


28

Use whatever tool fits your needs. Knowing VIM or Emacs is a good thing if you ever have to login into a remote server and edit a config file or something similar. I know VIM reasonably well, but I wouldn't use it to develop in Java. That's what Eclipse, Netbeans etc. are made for.


28

You can do two things. Point out that warnings are there for a reason. Compiler writers don't put them in because they are mean-spirited. People in our industry are generally helpful. Many warnings are helpful. Gather up a history of spectacular failures arising from ignored warnings. A web search for "Pay attention to compiler warnings" returns some ...


28

Yes, that is good to have one code format styles for all developers. Design the code style formats and import that to all developers eclipse. This will help when we are merging code to 'Version control' system.


28

Strict code formatting rules are useful when several developers work on the same code using a version control system. Merging can be a pain if different developers have different formatting rules as the same code would look different for the merging tool. Eclipse (or any good IDE for that matter) has code formatting rules that can be customized in the ...


25

For pair programming sake, it's nice if both parties infront of the screen has the same skills when using the keyboard. It's also nice to know that, if your project has special configuration needs in the IDE, then It's configured the same way for everybody. Getting a new developer started is easier when the tools are the same for everyone. But if you ...


23

The practices of adding meaningful prefixes to symbols, such as the well-publicized Hungarian Notation, date back to the times when IDEs did not exist or were too primitive. Today, when finding a point of declaration is a mouse click away, there is no point in spoiling the most precious part of the name, its first few letters, by assigning a common prefix.


22

This is kind of a "have you stopped beating your wife?" question. While there are Microsoft products that cost thousands of dollars, there are plenty more (from Microsoft) that are free, always, to everyone (eg Express) and ways (legitimate, real, ways) to get the expensive products for free. See Are there deals (free or low cost) to license Visual Studio ...


18

Yes, it's a bit of a red flag that management considers itself a better judge of which tools you would be more efficient with than you are.


18

I've found the autoformatter very useful. Instead of constantly taking microdecisions on how the code should be formatted -- something which is error-prone and causes "cognitive friction" -- you can set up formatting rules and let Eclipse format the code for you (ideally automatically using "Save actions"). Of course, this requires that you have a code base ...


16

I hear the difference with IntelliJ is that they are much more likely to fix and close bugs that you submit. That could make a big difference if there is some Eclipse bug that is blocking you. On the other hand, you cannot look at IDEs in isolation; you need to look at the ecosystem. Here, I think Eclipse has an advantage (similar to Firefox's advantage ...


15

You could start by working on coding katas. Pick an algorithm (e.g. decimal-to-Roman numeral conversion, scoring a bowling game, Conway's game of life, etc.) and try to use TDD to work on the solution. Your solution structure will likely to be very simple (much simpler than your real-world production code): one class for the test fixture and one class ...


15

Back in 1995 when I started programming in Java, there was a lot of manual work that is now done automatically. Updating classpaths, remembering what order to compile large projects in (remember, ant and maven hadn't been invented either, and make isn't easy to use). The class libraries were a smaller set of things to know. Instead of auto-complete, I had a ...


15

There is a VERY long, yet very informative, post by Joel Spolsky on his blog that explains some of this... Basically it amounts to the notion that large corporations with tons of money will pay that hefty fee. The mid sized and smaller companies will go for something cheaper, and the tiny shops will use the free version (or the expensive version acquired ...


15

What are you trying to gain, how anal retentive are you going to be in enforcing it (and in the level of detail your "rules" will be set out), are you going to try to enforce it on code written in different languages, are you going to try to enforce it retroactively on existing code? a common look and feel to code can indeed help make code more readable, ...


15

Eclipse creates just empty methods that return null (hence "stub"). The comments are inserted to remind the developer that he'll probably want to do something in those methods, otherwise why should they exist? You're supposed to delete the comments when you've done that. If you see those comments all over the place, then either (if the actually contain ...


14

It's not a red flag in itself. Sometimes management need to take decisions. Any issues that require standardisation on something tend to fall into that category. I once worked at a client who had allowed standards to drift for a few years and they had 20+ different SCM tools. What started as independent choice by different development teams turned into a ...


14

I feel that you're doing it wrong. You're heading towards unmaintainable spaghetti environment. Java projects tend to grow to tens or hunderds of dependencies. You start from Guava, JodaTime, SLF4J some commons and it grows... and it's OK. Just don't try to maintain it manually. Maven/Gradle is a must! Never ever commit eclipse workspace files. It just not ...


13

Mylyn is a very widely appreciated plugin for Eclipse, and is available on the main Eclipse site now. It can watch the pieces of code that you work on together (for example, when changing "tax calculation" code, you tend to use the same five files) and then emphasize them the next time you work on the same task. It's a great way to undo the "information ...


13

Disclaimer This is limited to Android development only (In Java obviously). I am coming to this with some limited knowledge of Eclipse and IntelliJ both; however, I have recently had to decide on a development environment for Android. It would seem that the first clear choice would be to use Eclipse since Google supports it with their ADT plugin. ...


12

I have been using emacs for 5+ years. I can no longer tell you the key combinations I'm using, my fingers just remembers them and have to look at the keyboard just to see what my hands are typing. A few years ago I started using Eclipse, and there is no chance I'm going back to emacs freely. Sorry muscle memory, even though you are missing ye old C-x r SPC ...


11

If you are using maven or something similar, it shouldn't matter which IDE you are using. There might be cases where one is tied to a specific IDE like eclipse, if there are plugins you rely on. I think you should be able to choose your own IDE, the IDE you are most productive in. However, as I already stated there are cases where it makes sense to use a ...


11

I'd have the "corporate mandated" IDE installed, but would still do most of my work in whatever IDE I wanted--it's not like anybody can tell what IDE was used to edit a source file. On the IDE vs. editor front... for almost all languages, I strongly prefer an IDE (IntelliJ) because there's just so much more it can do for you than an editor can. There are ...


11

Don't -- create a cool UI encompassing whatever cool thing said spreadsheet does. Do not attempt to build a UI on top of a spreadsheet as a datastore -- especially a complex spreadsheet that is already an app in it's own right -- if you can help it. Sometime in your professional life you will probably have to do this, but it is a challenge best left until ...


10

Back then, the tools were simpler (yes, there were Java-IDEs around relatively early), but back then, Java didn't come with all those enterprisey frameworks like today. It was just like any other programming language. You had a problem, you wrote a program. Dead simple.



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