Hot answers tagged

88

As a relatively new employee at my current company (less than 6 months), I'll just point out that I always prefer to be told of things like this ASAP rather than later. If I don't know that I'm doing something wrong, I'm going to continue doing it wrong and it's going to probably cause more work for others involved in the project. I don't want my team leader ...


87

No. Never work for free for anyone but yourself. You'll get more out of good open-source credentials and personal projects, in the way of job-hunting, than you will out of working for some son of a b__ who thinks that your skills aren't worth paying for. Of course, if no one is willing to pay for your skills, you may need to find another career: software ...


84

HTML and CSS are difficult to interview for a few reasons: They are too basic, compared, for example, to a programming language, They depend very much on the context of the job. Examples: If you create Google scale, hugely fast and optimized websites, the people you interview for the job cannot ignore what CSS sprites are. If you create XHTML W3C valid ...


83

Should I attempt to determine whether a person really possesses all of the skills they claim to have? Why? To determine if they're a big fat liar? Or to humiliate them? Or to prove your total technical superiority? Or to make a hiring decision? Be sure to distinguish between doing the right thing in hiring and being a jerk about nuances on someone's ...


65

I regularly end up working 50+ hours a week To me thats all you need to tell your manager. "Im working 50+ hours a week to make sure the work gets done. Im a hard worker but this is unsustainable long term, you should hire another developer". If that dosent work then I suggest you start looking for a new job.


59

I've never worked for free, but have worked almost for free, and can honestly tell you, the less somebody pays, the less they appreciate you. Besides, you don't need an employer any more, the barrier to entry is so low, if you have a computer and an internet connection, you can start your own company. If you are willing to work for free, I recommend (in ...


42

Incorrect. Grades are important especially if you have no or little professional programming experience. It's the bulk of your resume until you have professional experience.


39

A college degree, whether actually affecting your programming performance, shows alot about you. That single piece of paper shows that you can commit to something and stick with it. On the purely technical side: It's true, some schools teach nothing but Java. You may never touch the stuff(I hate coffee ;) ) after school, but generic programming paradigms ...


37

I think they can be helpful, but you have to be aware that their job isn't to find a good place for you, it's to sell you on a place that hired them to find people. I haven't dealt with many recruiters in my career (yet?) but the ones I did come across were fairly non-technical and were just parroting vague job description details to me and making promises ...


34

The longer you go letting him use his coding style the more code there will be to fix. I'd tell him/her as soon as possible. Just make sure to make it non-personal... "This is our standard, please follow it" kind of thing. And keep in mind that this new person is going through a lot right now, new team, new projects and may not even notice that the code ...


31

People regularly offer to work for me for free. (Explaining their reasoning just sounds like bragging, so I've removed what I wrote. Let's just take that as a given, ok?). I ALWAYS refuse. Even if I don't pay a salary, taking someone on costs me in both money and time. Here's what I write to people who email me making this offer: We never take on ...


31

1) Regarding interviewing etiquette, should I attempt to determine whether a person really possesses all of the skills they claim to have? Can I do this without making the candidate feel uncomfortable? No. Find out of they posess the skills needed for the job you need them to do (and if they're "Smart and Gets Things Done"). 2) Regarding the ...


31

Advice: Don't be afraid of learning new things - you made a good First Step in acknowledging that you could do better and then made the effort to learn how you could do better. Yes, it takes more time up front, but the payoff is usually worth it in the long run. Now that you know CodeIgniter, you can use it for the next future project(s). You can put it on ...


30

I have worked as, and managed staff in both situations, and combinations of both. I've made the following observations: Junior staff do not work remotely. They require a good and personal working relationship with a mentor. I find my junior staff would rather wait for me to be available than to ask the rather senior (and good) remote developer anything. ...


28

Source: http://shouldiworkforfree.com/


27

I generally don't care too much about the specific skill sets listed on the resume. I just ask them about the work they do/have done. The word matching part of resumes is unfortunate for all concerned and I blame the recruiters. If the person is/does blatantly lie about experience then of course you want to consider if they are a good fit for you. I ...


27

Here's my magic question to sort out exaggerated claims. You have [insert technology] listed here in your skills... How comfortable are you with answering technical questions about that? Honest candidates will tell you outright if they haven't worked on that technology for five years, or only have had basic exposure, or studied that in college twelve ...


26

I've been in a similar boat. A very similar boat. The one thing that really helped me make the "we need to expand the team" argument stick was how high our bus factor was -- if I got hit by one, there was no one who had any clue about the entire stack we relied upon. Getting someone else on the team was crucial for operations if nothing else.


21

You guys are screening for the wrong thing. You need to be looking for the Smart & Gets Things Done people, not the I know the minutiae of the C++ standard because I don't have to crank out code in my real job people. I worked in a big company once (never again)... for a little over a year (felt like 10)... I know how insulated most of those guys are ...


21

"Error Free" is far too subjective. One man's "Unfufilled feature request" is another man's "Error". Something like "Should substantially meet design specs" would be more appropriate. I've never actually seen what you describe in a job description. I've seen it for contract work, but not for employees.


21

What you are going through sounds quite normal to me. This is how we work on our craft and get better and better at what we do.


20

Intellectual Property Clauses Such clauses may state that the employer owns all intellectual property rights for any creative work produced during employment. If this is something that is important to you then make sure all vagueness around the definition of intellectual property and creative work is clarified and/or removed. As programmers we write a lot ...


20

When I graduated my resume was fairly sparse. Whilst looking for my first job, I approached a local charity and built them a web site. Doing this had many benefits: Firstly volunteering your skills for a good cause feels good It was a valuable addition to my portfolio/work experience I gained valuable experience I had additional experience to discuss in ...


20

Here are some questions I would ask about CSS: CSS box model. Margins, padding, etc. IE model vs. W3C model. How can one switch between the two? What are their benefits and drawbacks? CSS positioning. What does it mean for an element to be "in the flow" and "out of the flow" inline-block and other display values. Difference between display: none; and ...


19

Put yourself in the place of a hiring manager at a large (or not so large) company. You have one or two entry level positions to fill, and 150 applicants. The easiest thing to do is filter out everyone with a GPA less that 3.0 (or 3.5). True, you may eliminate a truly good candidate. But you will also cut down on your workload, and the time before you ...


19

No Unless your contract specifically forbids freelancing, what you do on your own time is none of his business.



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