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First of all, be aware that ESB and Microservices can mean different things depending on context. Also, it seems that people usually consider Microservices within a pull-architecture: there are Restful APIs and each service calls other service's APIs to get data as needed. ESB, on the other hand is usually associated with a push-architecture: systems put ...


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http://www.computerworld.com/article/2920785/cloud-storage/ibm-cloud-will-reach-back-to-tape-for-low-cost-storage.html Stephen Lawson said: "... IBM's system, which it calls Project Big Storage, puts all tiers of storage under one namespace, creating a single pool of data that users can manage through folders and directories without worrying about where ...


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You need to look at what the root problem is. Are you seeking data redundancy? Are you seeking minimal data access times? Are you seeking sharing data across separate environments? Are you seeking to minimize security vulnerabilities with access to the data? Once you decide what the highest priority is, then you can work on finding the best solution. ...


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It's hard to answer. Both approaches seem valid. most of the arguments seem weak. And you can make both of the architectures mimic the other's intended interface. I'm mostly a ""server side"" developer, and i pretty much prefer the first (FE) approach, just because it'll give me more control, and i could offer the client a simple clear interface with less ...


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Since users will be somehow authenticated during usage, you could "flag" trial accounts status and keep track of their activity: User A logs in. User A performs an action against the service A combination of the user ID + timestamp is tracked Check the earliest timestamp associated with the same user ID IF the check passes (the earliest and the current are ...


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You are correct in that you cant ensure logout with a web application, where you essentially download a client program and then make intermittent requests for data the server. There are a few work arounds for this problem that I know of 1: define 'logged out' as automatically occurring after a period of inactivity This may not be best for you with such ...


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I suppose that with this number of users it is not hosting but dedicated servers where you can install everything you need to your service. If it is right my suggestion is to use some external storage like Redis where login token (or other user identifier that passed from client to server) will be the key and value is all data you want to know about the user ...


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Generally if you push more code to DB and if you do it right, it should result in performance increase. And I don't see why the interviewer claim its other way round. Personally I would not put any code into DB simply due to ease of maintenance and ease of unit testing. In most of the applications performance improvement due to moving logic into DB does not ...


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The main reason for not having code in the database is testability and maintenance. It is relatively hard to test the database code and it is a kind of hidden logic, which will become hard to maintain as you logic is spread all over and regress especially in the maintenance phase of your project.


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Performance does neither increase or decrease because "you put most of the code into database" or because "you keep the code out of the database". The key point is to put the right parts of the code into the database (or to keep them out). Parts which helps to reduce the network traffic might be a good fit for stored procedures. Parts which do heavy ...



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