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4

There are some licenses that specifically prohibit military usage. http://mindprod.com/contact/nonmil.html "Open-source" licenses that explicitly prohibit military applications The problem with those kinds of things, is they become incompatible with other licenses such as the GPL. So on the surface they might seam 'reasonable' but they can ...


10

This question comes up fairly regularly in the free software community and this is understandable. People writing free software (often in their spare time) and donating it to the public normally do this because they want to make a difference for the better, not for the worse. So trying to ensure that your craft is not used in a way that you consider ...


9

If you're concerned about the ethics of industry X, rather than creating a license that discriminates against industry X, you could approach it differently; you could go the dual license approach, and create a free and commercial version. Then make donations to some anti industry X organization - either in the form of a full commercial version or some cut of ...


17

When you look at the current market, there are already licenses that have stipulations about what the software might be used for. Apple has a stipulation in their iTunes license which says you're not allowed to use it to develop nuclear weapons. the game Far Cry 2 has a stipulation in the license that you're not allowed to use it contrary to morality or ...


2

Any license which restricts use of the software to certain purposes is by definition not a Free Software license. It is a violation of the very first of what GNU considers the four essential freedoms: The freedom to run the program as you wish, for any purpose (freedom 0). You can find several in GNU's list of non-free software licenses, but ...


13

You can write any license you like, and sue anyone who uses your code contrary to the terms of the license for copyright infringement. Your terms "not to be used by industry X" makes the license incompatible with the GPL license, for example. I cannot include your software in GPL code that I want to distribute (or that may be distributed accidentally, ...


31

There exist software projects that use a license like this. However, these would not be considered free licenses by the OSI definition. More importantly, the enforceability of these licenses has been strongly questioned every time I've seen them mentioned, and they have never, to the best of my knowledge, been tested in court. Using such a license is ...



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