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156

No site blocking. If my projects are delivered on time and my productivity is not suffering, I don't see any reason to block anything (except - if you really must block something - well known spyware/malware sites). I don't really have anything else to add except that. We are professionals, not children.


118

This will vary but this is how I see it at a place large enough to have distinctions between types of programmers. I would say entry level and Junior are the same thing. They are just out of school and have less than two years of work experience. They are assigned the least complex tasks and should be supervised fairly closely. Generally they know about 10% ...


71

It was actually in a 3rd party image viewer sub-component of our application. We found that there were 2-3 of the users of our application would frequently have the image viewer component throw an exception and die horribly. However, we had dozens of other users who never saw the issue despite using the application for the same task for most of the work ...


60

I was in your exact situation recently. My company wanted to hire another programmer and I specifically wanted someone with more experience than me so I could continue to learn and grow. I was most nervous about the Interviews, so asked a question on here. To summarize, ask questions you know the answer to, are related to problems you have, or are ...


57

You never have to stop programming, ever, as long as you are enjoying what you are doing. However, your organization might have a ceiling that you reach, and you simply can't go into a higher position or obtain a greater salary unless you leave the company or leave programming and move into a leadership role as a manager or technical lead.


56

There is an old saying, variously attributed: A level people want to work with A level people. B level people want to work with C level people. Do you aspire to be an A level person or a B level one? Answer honestly. The reason why this happens is very simple. A level people get to be A level people by challenging themselves and learning from the best ...


47

No blocking at all. Good developers Those will get the job done, they know how to find information quickly and they also know how to use that information. Of course if you don't give them enough to do, they'll waste their time over at the Stackoverflow Chatrooms :P Bad developers Well you can't do anything about them. If you block 90% of the interwebz just ...


42

"Years of experience" is more of a probability scale than a measure of anything concrete. With more years in, you get an increased chance that a person has encountered things such as: Has participated in a crisis-like event. Has seen a project from beginning to end. Has seen a project fail to begin or end. Has worked on legacy code. Has worked on a blank ...


40

I don't think your plan is workable. Very few people can walk into a project cold and begin making a useful contribution within a week. Even if you are one of these rare people, your sponsors have no way of knowing that, so you'd be asking them to make a leap of faith, interrupting their own work schedule to orient you and set you up. I mean, even if the ...


36

Concentrate on what you need to do. Make the effort to actually start doing it. This can be one of the hardest things - to actively stop fluffing about. Don't have email open. Don't have Fakebook in another window. Don't have any StackExchange going. No forums. Only quiet. And then get on with it. It generally takes me (and pretty much everyone else I ...


35

I would like to pose a counter-question: Can fixed scope + fixed deadline + fixed price contract ever be made to work, period? The "good/fast/cheap - pick two" saying isn't just some silly engineering joke. Every project manager worth his salt knows about the Project Management Triangle: You're telling us that the cost, scope, and schedule are all ...


34

It has ruined my ability to enjoy technology in fiction. I can suspend my disbelief whilst the hero of the [book / film / drama] can withstand numerous karate kicks, fire an infinite number of bullets, leap across a 50ft gap between two buildings, fall from a great height onto a pile of conveniently stacked boxes etc. What makes me shout at the screen in ...


31

This is an argument that pops up regularly, in many fields and in many forms. The general form of this argument is: Does having [x:tool/technology] make people worse at [y:function affected by x]? For example: Does CAD software make for worse engineers? Do calculators in high school make students worse at math? Does social software stunt people's ...


31

Zero. If you have a developer who doesn't produce, blocking websites won't help that. The quantity and quality of code produced by a developer is a not linearly scalable with time spent staring into an IDE. Being productive in creative and challenging work requires "contiguous time" and "flexible time." Contigious time is a block of time where a developer ...


31

The main benefit of knowing multiple languages isn't in writing them directly. All other things being equal, I'd rather work with a C# programmer who also knows C, Python and Lisp (for example) than one who's only ever hacked in C#. It's not that knowing more languages is better, it's that being able to think about problems at multiple levels and from ...


31

I've worked with many good programmers who did not have a degree (or in fact any formal qualification in s/w at all). HOWEVER - The trouble with not being educated formally is simple: You don't know what you don't know. As a consequence, I've seen people go off and use all sorts of horrible methods to solve problems (such as for example, parsers, and some ...


28

The thing with learning drastically different languages isn't about learning the languages, it's about getting exposure to different approaches to problems. Tools for the toolbox as it were. One thing to note is that Haskell isn't particularly old and it is actually a very good candidate for someone only familiar with mainstream languages. Even a very old ...


27

Yes.    In my (admittedly limited) experience, the non-FOSS solutions tend to be more "enterprise-y". That is, They integrate with everything under the sun. They have more built-in controls for complex business logic (permissions, access control, approval, etc). They come with support contracts and reasonably responsive tech support lines. They're well ...


27

Me Pretty much self-taught since I was 7, the odd few people influence over the years, but generally I've always found the best teacher is experience. Nothing like a couple of decades of continual improvement, interspersed with occasionally frustrating days, that are ultimately eye-openers for the future. These days, the internet kind of changes that - so ...


26

Finish your degree. If you don't, you might end up regretting it for the rest of your life. Some important things to remember: Whether right or wrong, most companies won't even look at a resume if you haven't graduated. The "real world" is hard. Dropping out isn't an option. Learn to finish what you started, even if it's hard. Programming is just one ...


26

Assuming that the more experienced person in the pair has the temperament to mentor the other person, pairing someone with little experience in the language or the problem domain with an experienced person would facilitate knowledge transfer. The less experienced person would have a mentor to instruct them on the language, the domain, the application, and ...


25

Entry Level - must give them explicit instructions, check everything they do, little or no design responsibility, no analysis responsibility Junior - less explicit instructions, less checking, some minor design and analysis responsibility; helps the entry-level people find the compiler and use the repository Senior - major design and analysis ...


25

IMHO Integrating in a new environment is great, it is one of the most fun things you can do :) What I do : listen a lot try to remember names from the beginning take notes, so you don't need to ask a question twice. (Especially , servers, password little trivia the team takes for granted) don't try to change their world, in the beginning you have to learn ...


23

I have mixed feelings about F#. I have a strong functional programming background and many years of C# experience, so I can see it from both sides and I think that F# makes too many compromises to satisfy people from either group. It's worth pointing out as well that .net is fundamentally an object-oriented imperative execution environment. It's not ...


23

A lack of proper input validation is one of those things which tends to lead quite quickly to users doing "bad" things with your application, when it should really be handled by the programmer. I've seen legacy apps where users have been trained to: not enter apostrophes in names not enter any symbol other than a-z0-9, ensure there are no spaces before or ...


23

Not knowing what version control is, or how to use it properly. One of the junior developers who has been at my company for several months recently had to get taught the very very basics of Subversion. It really made me cringe... she's been checking in code to live projects the whole time... and had no idea what she was doing...?


23

Not asking enough questions I know they're juniors, I expect that they will make mistakes and just not know things. So many royal f**k ups could have been avoided by just asking a question instead of assuming something. Honestly, I can't be pestered enough. I had TONNES of questions when I started out - asking them saved my arse on a number of occasions. ...


23

There are three differences between commercial experience and non-commercial, in terms of language skills (there are many more in terms of general development experience). Commercial is generally full-time, and thus more valuable than a part-time non-commercial. That said, not all non-commercial is part-time. Commercial tends to involve working in a team, ...


22

Well, that's a legitimate question. Some older people can get along with younger people really well; others, not so well. You can be very good at what you do, but still not fit in will with the group who's doing it with you, and that can be bad both for you and for them. I'd say, forget about "what about all my experience?" You wouldn't have gotten to ...


22

I have never had the oppurtunity to work with someone far more experienced than myself. I would definitely hire them. Many great programmers suggest "get a mentor" as a way to rapidly learn. This may be your opportunity for that. Even if they hinder you from moving up at this job, you may learn from them the skills needed to get a great position somewhere ...



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