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Every Microsoft operating system, starting with MS-DOS, has understood, at the kernel level, both forward slashes and backslashes. Therefore, on Windows, you can convert between them freely; both have equal status as reserved separators. In any valid path, you can replace backslashes with slashes and vice versa, without changing its meaning, as far as the ...


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There are two aspects to that question: why would one want to develop a filesystem interface to data, and the other, why would one want to do that in userspace? Let's answer the second one first, because it's the obvious one: because it is waaaaayyyyy easier. In fact, the question should be asked the other way around: why would one want to implement a ...


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At a glance, it appears to be similar to FUSE, which is used for the development of dozens of filesystems and filesystem-like tools. Essentially, anything that makes sense in the form of files and directories can be exposed as a filesystem, and mounted through FUSE or WinFsp as if it were a physical disk, all with the added benefits of running as a user ...


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More specifically, why would anyone want to build a User Space file system? Easier semantics. No obscure system calls. Better isolation. A User Space file system crash doesn't bring down the whole OS. Easier to update than the kernel. Support for several programming languages. You're not re-implementing NTFS. What you're actually doing is adding ...



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