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2

No comment on the original creation of hidden files but now that they exist it's very tempting to keep using them. Hidden files offer a convenient mechanism for associating arbitrary metadata with a directory location while remaining largely independent of file system or OS mechanics. There might be "better" ways to store folder icons or search indices for ...


3

On Unix they were an accident at least initially https://plus.google.com/+RobPikeTheHuman/posts/R58WgWwN9jp Second, and much worse, the idea of a "hidden" or "dot" file was created. As a consequence, more lazy programmers started dropping files into everyone's home directory. I don't have all that much stuff installed on the machine I'm using to type ...


5

Let me go type ls on my home directory for a moment. ~ $ ls Desktop/ Downloads/ Movies/ Projects/ Development/ IdeaProjects/ Music/ Public/ Documents/ Library/ Pictures/ bin/ ~ $ Yep, its a mac. And a relatively new one. I've got 12 directories there. Now lets try ls -a ~ $ ls -a ./ .gnome2/ ...


6

This depends heavily on the filesystem and the operating system. For example, on Unix, there are no folders at all: Windows has completely different terminology. Classic MacOS had a different terminology, which, in OSX, is now mixing with Unix terminology.


5

It really depends upon the file system and the operating system. In POSIX and Unix, a file can be a directory, a plain file, a block device, a character device, a FIFO, a socket, a symbolic link, ... See POSIX stat & Linux stat(2), notice that file can have different types. So if you want to speak of a file whose type is plain and which is a sequence ...



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