Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

I'm a full time web-developer, and I use Chrome's Developer Tools on a daily basis. I have only ever touched Firebug a few times for debugging in Firefox. For the times I have used Firebug however, I felt as though the functionality was much the same. I played around with a number of different areas and found everything to be as intuitive and functional as ...


14

There are 4 places a browser can leak memory: The web page In modern browsers this is fully up to the web developer. Garbage-collected environments don't collect memory that is still being referenced to, and there are a lot of ways to keep referencing memory without meaning to (e.g. create a closure to attach as an event handler and accidentally include a ...


11

Although I can commiserate on a preference for FireFox, I use it myself, I think you need some perspective. If you are prioritizing what is easier for the developer over what the end-user wants you are doing it ass-backwards. Software is not written for the benefit of the software developer, it is written to provide business value to the people who use it. ...


10

Here is the best answer I found on the 'Net, Memory Leakage in Internet Explorer - revisited, and a snippet to explain why: The above pattern will leak due to the circular reference created between a DOM node and a JS element. Since the JScript garbage collector is a mark and sweep GC, you may think that it would handle circular references. And ...


8

Chrome Developer Tools may substitute vanilla FireBug, but the strength of FireBug lies with so many extension being available for it.


8

Amazing! I did the exact same thing as you, but that was 12-15 years ago and the battle was Netscape Communicator vs Internet Explorer 4. I even asked for arguments on different forums, primarily usenet. Anyway, It didn't matter how many arguments I could bring forth for Netscape, the company was hell bent on using IE anyway and that was the end of it. Some ...


7

Firefox has used PDF.js as the default PDF viewer since Firefox 19. When you view a PDF in Firefox (provided you haven't changed your browser's PDF settings), you are viewing an HTML rendering of the document. You can't "view source" because there was no HTML source downloaded, but you can "inspect element" because the document you're viewing in-browser is ...


4

You are one who made the error, you are the one who has to fix it. As a developer you don't get to dictate what browser the company uses. You have to develop to their needs not what you want. This kind of cowboy programming can easily get you fired as you wasted the company's money doing something you were not authorized to do.


4

First of all, when a driver crashes, that's a security risk, and so drivers should never, ever, crash. Others have pointed this out. It's an OS or driver bug you ran across, not a firefox one. Now, to the other question: why does only firefox trigger this bug? There's a multipast answer to that: Most apps use the old 2d graphics api's, which have been ...


4

Let's reflect a bit here for a minute - the only browser in the last decade to cause major problems for existing sites when it changed version number was Internet Explorer. I don't recall a single instance of a client calling me and telling me their site is now broken with the latest version of Chrome or Firefox. There might've been some very minor visual ...


4

According to Mozilla, the rapid release schedule is to accommodate the "speed of the web", but there's no reason that same thing couldn't be accomplished releasing minor updates with minor update numbers. They were releasing minor updates about the same pace they are now releasing "major" updates, it's just that they increment a different segment of the ...


3

HTTP caching is quite complex and influenced by a number of HTTP headers, so there is ample room for misunderstanding and different interpretations of the standard. And the standard has been extended a few times. This explains why you're seeing different results with different browsers. This document explains it in detail. Read it, understand it, then look ...


3

This isn't really news; there have been many projects with similar goals. As a closest example I can point you to Adobe's Alchemy. It was never really 'hot', but it is similar in concept. It was a step in the 'near-native speed' direction, though it was still far. An important difference is Alchemy compiled C++ to Flash bytecode, and Flash support, while ...


3

Advantages: browser updates are now following a push model ala Chrome so that you aren't waiting on users to go out and download the latest browser. Rapid release allows the browser developer to push new features out quicker instead of having to wait for a major update. There will soon be only one "version" of a browser. Disadvantages: pretty much all of ...


3

Firebug still has the edge in a couple ways Network traffic debug. Much easier to dig into ajax request/responses and look at headers and data in the log in Firebug Chrome (at least, latest chrome dev) has an annoying habit of hanging on to cached files even when I do a shift-F5 reload and an updated file is served. Firebug seems to reliably reload cache ...


3

Dude, that's why it's called a job and not a hobby. If the people signing the checks want you to use stone tablets and chisels, do it. IE has supported jQuery for a while. Find out which versions of IE you must support and get to work testing your app on those.


2

The reasons why I, as a developer, used Firefox exclusively was because of Firebug. The developer tools you can add to Firefox are really great. The downside is that Firefox is so awesome and smart that it fixes your shoddy coding for you. Forget a div tag? No worries, it'll clean it up for you. Now, when you get to the end of a project and you need a ...


2

Really you should structure your application to work at least decently on multiple browsers. The best way to do that is to focus on something like Firefox or Chrome and then patch/edit to get IE to work. (Doing the reverse is a pain). If a company has a standard that says IE has to be used, then what you need to go after is the group that sets the ...


2

Fundamentally, you can't tell. No matter what CMS you use, you can always strip the identifying information from it. Plone, for example, is currently themed using a system called Diazo (a subset of Deliverance) which basically plugs chunks of content into any given CSS + HTML theme. Tons of other web applications rely on thin web frameworks or are simply ...


2

One one hand, it is a good thing since new features and updated support can be pushed out in more regular cycles, rather than waiting for a big-bang type of release. On the flip side, it means there is a greater range of support levels for different browsers - more versions of Firefox and Chrome out there. This is negated somewhat by the rapid release ...


2

I wouldn't be surprised if what you are categorizing as "leaks" is instead some aggressive cacheing. Even today, network round-trip time is "expensive" (time-wise) compared to fetching something from an in-memory cache. I'd recommend grabbing the source for Firefox or Chromium and taking a look at how they manage their caches. I know that Firefox at least ...


2

Convert your CSV file into a Selenium script which is basically HTML and run inside your browser. (http://docs.seleniumhq.org/projects/ide/)


2

Chrome's debugging tools (at least for me) have a very confusing interface. When I was experimenting with Chrome I gave them a try but just couldn't understand them. I quickly switched to Firebug lite.


2

I would recommend using Chrome for this. The inspect and debugging tools allow you to view the js source files along with the html and css. Steps: Right click on the element in question in Google Chrome. Click inspect element which is the last item in the menu. The developer menu will popup in the bottom of the screen. The html for the selected element ...


1

Dropdowns are semi-searchable in chrome and firefox. Just start typing and it will jump to option that matches typed text. You probably didn't notice it in your example since all options start with same text and pressing space finishes the searching. Example at http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tryit.asp?filename=tryhtml_select


1

before you call $, which is the variable for jquery, you need to let the page load first, then call any jquery object: $(document).ready(function () { $("body").css("background-color", "#405DA7"); }); "Javascript statements are executed by the browser immediately and not when the DOM is ready." - See Pro jquery by Adam Freeman ...


1

Chrome's tools may well be an adequate substitute for Firebug - I use Firebug personally, but that's largely due to being totally comfortable with it after using it for a long time; and I work with some talented developers who use Chrome and its tools to great effect. But a more important point is: the thorniest problems that you're likely to have to debug ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible