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Digia bought Qt from Nokia in 2012. They are focused on the mobile market and QML, but Qt Widgets and the C++ API are still supported. Qt's future is safe&proof.


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I don't particularly care for any of your proposed approaches simply because it's tying your classes directly to your configuration. Which means that once you do decide on an approach then you are pretty much stuck with it. Instead, you should consider adopting more of a dependency injection approach. class Bootstrap { public function ...


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If you have enough of these little configuration values that you feel the need to put them in another file, then they should go in a configuration file, not a source code file. There are countless ways of implementing config files, but I believe PHP has some standard approaches. To answer your numbered questions more directly: 1) They're never really ...


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Spending a lot of time on yet another framework to perform CSS polyfills, implement a grid system, and handle basic responsive design is a major productivity drag. And – no offense – it's very tough to get this stuff right across browsers. So starting with a well-tested, hardened CSS boilerplate is how I would go. That said, Bootstrap isn't the only cowboy ...


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When you use Bootstrap you can use parts of the framework - such as responsive grid without using rest of it. It also allows you to do quite significant customization with less/scss variables. You can then merge it with your own custom parts. Great thing about framework is that it's tested, robust, and in case of bootstrap, very comprehensive. It will take ...


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Yes, this is a very common architecture so the problem does pop up frequently. What I would do is that I would introduce a new level of abstraction by defining a "model" for my project which contains and presents the classes that my project deals with irrespective of how they are obtained (via HTTP or ORM.) On the server, this model would be implemented ...


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It's less a question of what a framework does than how it does it. Frameworks exist to abstract away certain tasks or details of implementation that might otherwise be complex, repetitive, or error-prone. Not all Java frameworks exist equally either. Some are proprietary, which means while they do cost money, they also come with, ideally, some level of ...



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