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3

If you're using a logging framework like Log4j, you can use a nested diagnostic context (NDC) to store the file name at the point it is available, then retrieve from the NDC at the time you log the messages. Logj4 NDC This can be even more useful because you can actually write a log4j appender that handles log messages specially based on the NDC content. ...


1

Few benefits of using GWT that I think of ( more details read my blog http://www.pandurangpatil.com/2012/09/benefits-of-using-gwt.html) As GWT client application is written in Java, one get an opportunity to catch syntactical mistakes at compile time because of the same (Though it doesn't support all the JRE classes as those features are not supported by ...


4

Catch the exception at the level where you do have the file name, incorporate the file name into the error message, and rethrow. This is a classic example of why exceptions are designed the way they are; they propagate up the call stack to the next available catch clause, where new information can be added to them where it is available. This avoids the ...


1

Choosing framework depending on many factors: Time/Resources: If you have time, then you can be more adventurous to try new technologies. If you have less time, keep it simple, if you have decent amount of time, do the research and find something which fits well to your dreams. On resources: if you have scarse resources (no income, spare time per day) then ...


2

When choosing any framework, consider its popularity, in terms of blog posts, StackOverflow questions, resources and documentation. A framework that's relatively new isn't guaranteed to blossom and may make you experts in a niche framework. Ideally you will want something that is easy for any new developer to get into. Ensure that it is a fit for your ...


1

I guess most important thing while choosing a framework/platform is the technological strength of your team members / developers. And yeah MVC for maintenance/re-useability point of view. But for a small, quick development - I would suggest PhP is best ! Even team doesnt know or have other web framework knowledge, they can adopt it very quickly with very ...


0

I think your question is based on a false premise. You start by saying that you're planning to rely on a framework, and then you ask if it's beneficial to learn beyond the framework. So of course you come to the conclusion it's not worth it. But that premise is flawed. You shouldn't focus on using a framework. You should focus on using the right tool for the ...


1

A general area that suffers from delving in the framework(s) before knowing the core language well is performance. This is true for all languages/platforms (Hibernate n+1 selects etc). Here's a lot of JQuery tips and tricks which rely (among other things) on good knowledge of the core language in relation to performance: Use For Instead of Each Native ...


1

Probably need a little balance in the amount you should learn. It's not all or nothing, so put as much time in it as you can. You have to ask yourself what risks you are wiling to accept by relying on the framework. It's great if all you need is to get some Minimum Viable Product up and running. There aren't going to be huge performance or complex ...


26

It's more important to study the language than it is to study the framework. Learn the language well, and you'll use the framework well. In order of importance (most important first): Fundamental programming principles - Algorithms, data structures, etc. Language paradigms - OOP, Functional, etc. Language features. Syntax and frameworks.


5

Of course. The question is "is that benefit worth the time investment?". I would argue that it always is, but it certainly depends on you and your environment since they will impact the benefit (how much your environment will gain from your knowledge) versus the cost (how long it takes you to learn, and how well you absorb knowledge). Why would I argue it's ...


2

I think the main disadvantage of using an IoC container is all the magic it does behind the scenes. (This is also a problem with ORMs, another common magical tool.) Debugging IoC issues is not fun, because it becomes harder to see how and when dependencies are being fulfilled. You can't step through dependency resolution in the debugger. Some projects use ...


1

Some developers argue that any framework you use in your code is a potential problem at a later date, because it typically requires you to write your code in a certain way to interact with it correctly, and this can cause issues at a later date if it turns out that those ways conflict with other design requirements. An example of this concern is expressed ...


6

There are a couple of compromises that are to be made when using DI frameworks as far as I can see. The most worrying for me is that your application code is usually spread between a main programming language (like Java) and XML/JSON configuration code (it is code). This means that in the case of problems with your application you need to look in two ...


0

I don't think DI frameworks can really become obsolete anytime soon. What should happen to make it obsolete? An invention of a new and smarter pattern maybe? However it should look like, it would require much bigger changes in the code. A change in the language maybe? Even worse. I'd say that the current DI is mature enough and I'm not aware of much ...


6

You are fully correct - using a DI framework will most probably make your code dependent from that thing. Actually, that's nothing very surprising, since this is typically true for every other framework or foundation library, especially when that lib supports your project with some generic features used everwhere in your code. For example, when you decide to ...


13

Ordinary constructor injection doesn't require a framework at all. The only thing you lose out on is the ability to centralize your dependencies in a configuration file. DI containers are an "enterprise software" pattern, used when the object graph is very large and complex. I suspect that 95% of applications do not require it.



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