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50

Hmm, what comes to my mind is Because you want to retain some measure of control over the product Because you want to reserve the possibility / right to charge for the product in the future Because you're ashamed of your source code Because you want to make sure you are credited for the product, and it doesn't get stolen and re-used in other projects (of ...


31

I would take a look at Fossil. It is the system the developers of sqlite use, internally, apparently. It also uses sqlite, which is a good solid technology... that is nice and portable - as well as simple and reliable. It has a good, if austere user-interface (which i think behooves the nature of a productivity-oriented goal such as you describe). ((Be ...


31

Unfortunately there is little you can do. I think you have the answers on your last paragraph. As far as making claims on your web site about other sources - put an app signature on your site, explain than some "less than desirable" sites are listing your apps and it should only be downloaded from <here> or <here>. Do not name or provide any ...


23

I would say that unrestrictive licenses such as the BSD, MIT and Apache licenses have done far more to promote FOSS than the GPL has. Examples: Castle Project, jQuery, SQLite, Apache, Hibernate and nHibernate, ASP.NET MVC, JSON.ORG, and many others. Most businesses are too wary of the GPL to allow GPL code anywhere near their development ...


22

One of my favorite productivity tools is freeware. I asked the author about the source one time, and he said he couldn't release it because it contains a lot of proprietary code that belongs to his employer. So I suppose that his employer doesn't mind it being used in a free tool, but that it's also being used in their commercial products and they don't ...


18

My simple rule is never to work for free. But this doesn't mean I always work for money. If I work for them, I ask them to give something in return. It might be even just be symbolic, like coming over and buying pizza if I spend an afternoon helping them typeset their thesis in LaTeX. A friend used to give me tennis classes and I helped him with his website. ...


17

Assuming the site is located in the US: Consider a "DMCA takedown notice". (yes, google the direct term) Spend some time researching the requirements, but you don't need an attorney to file the complaint. The wikipedia article is a decent start. There are sample letters that will serve your purposes. You'll start with the offending website; they'll ...


16

Gitorious is open source and you can install it on your own server (it's not very easy to install, though) it will soon have private repositories. It does not have Wiki and issues. Another option would be Gitlab which is basically a GitHub clone, not as mature as gitorious but it's under heavy development with monthly releases. You might also want to ...


16

There are two answers here, because there are two principal ways to look at this. First, sometimes free software thrives in competition with proprietary software because it wasn't designed to make money in the first place. That's not the only thing that motivates people, after all. But if you're looking for a way to monetize free software, you're ...


15

The license terms for Visual Studio Express allow you to write applications that can be used for any purpose, including commercial applications.


15

A tried to organize the suggestions into two parts with three points each: the first point targets people without technical background, the second one: every person, and the last one, the people with more IT knowledge. Content First and most important, the content of your website should reflect the fact that your software product is updated frequently. ...


12

Use libraries that are stable. What would the alternative be anyway? Rewriting the code from scratch?


12

According to Wikipedia, any software licensed under the NASA Open Source Agreement is open source, but not free, so that would be one example.


12

"Free" is a pretty vaguely defined word, and you'll never find a definition with which absolutely everyone agrees. In the case of Java, a lot of doubt probably stems from the fact that the JDK used to be partially closed source - the OpenJDK project was started only in 2006. Some of hte things you read may be from before that time. With the GLP-licensed ...


11

If you are going to do a free website, do it understanding that it will not give you any benefits beyond helping a friend. In my experience, the whole "it gets your name out there" argument is pretty much garbage. I've done a half dozen websites for free, and have never had a paying job come of it. Nor did I expect one. If people ask me to do a website ...


11

With due respect - "An Enterprise level piece of software...." written by one developer over a couple of months - I don't know if I should offer you a job or suggest a good "Product Misrepresentaiton" Lawyer. I suggest that you software is very unlikely to be suitable for "Enterprise" level deployment at such an early stage in the SDLC. As such, it would ...


9

The GNU GPL has been successful despite its FLOSS enforcement, not because of it. Companies are for the most part voluntarily contributing to and releasing code under the GPL. There are no significant algorithms and libraries covered by it, which would compel commercial developers to deproprietarize. Apple makes a good example. They've adopted KHTML and ...


9

There are not statistics for this question. For the following reasons: 'freeware' is not accurately defined Program usage is not tracked (or in most cases not shared) at a useful enough level The data will vary intensely depending on what user groups you include. I suggest you determine the root of your question and find another way to solve your issue. ...


9

It's really a case by case thing. There are many variables affecting your decision to charge or not: Time: How much time will it take you to complete it. Delivery: When is it expected to be delivered? Is there pressure to finish? Profit: Is the project meant for profit? If someone is goind to make money of it, why can't you as well? Relationship: How close ...


9

Java itself has been opened sourced, so in that respect it is free. Some library implementations are open source, some are not. The ones from Sun have been opened sourced with the rest of the language. As for the software you write - that's up to you.


9

The Express editions expire after 30 days if you don't register. Registration is free, and requires you to sign up saying what you use the tool for and some check boxes for receiving promotional emails or not.


8

One I don't see here yet - because the source code has value in itself, separate from the application as a whole. If you have useful libraries that you've written, you're likely to use them even in projects that you intend to give away. That doesn't mean you're willing to give that library source code away. And without those libraries, the rest of the ...


8

The problem is that in order to call something "Java" you need to get it certified as compliant to the Java spec. One of the pre-requisites of getting this certification is running you JVM through a test suite - Java Technology Compatibility Kit (TCK). This test suite is NOT open sourced. So you can build a JVM that behaves in a very Java like way and be ...


8

The open source business model is not much about selling lots of copies to many individual customers. This model would not be sustainable, because each of your customers could compete with you and underbid you. But there are other business models which allow you to make money from open source software: Support and consulting fees: Your software may be ...


7

There are two that seem to be the most common: Develop free software and sell support for it Develop free software and offer it under a less restrictive license for a fee. The second model mandates that the company own 100% of the copyright of the software. This means, contributors are required to sign a copyright assignment. Here is a hypothetical ...


7

IMO third party libraries are very good thing, but I have a rule that can use only libraries that have source code. On my previous job we used Delphi and that policy saved our butts so many times since many Delphi 3rd party vendors went out of the business, you never know.


7

Well if your project is interesting enough, you are going to have a lot of artwork. The problem would be to choose what suits you. I mean icons, logos and such. Not quite sure about css and other web things, though. So I would contact people contributing art to opensource projects and hobbyist designers at deviantart or openDesktop.org *-look.org chain (I ...


7

I would be wary of doing free projects for friends and family. They tend to snowball and go down hill quickly. How do you tell one friend sure, but then when the next asks you say no. Can lead to some strained relations Doing free work for other projects that aren't for friends and family can be beneficial. You may not only learn new technologies and ...



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