Hot answers tagged

20

Everyone wants to make video games. It sounds awesome. This creates competition among prospects. The employers set the conditions of competition, which in this case has turned into a "who can take the most crap" competition.


15

In the enterprise world, an algorithm always functions the same way. I'll write a unit test for an algorithm, I'll expect the value 42 and it'll error if I don't get that value. This is not very different in games. The presence of two modes and multiple flags in the game you're working on doesn't change anything: if you take a specific mode with a specific ...


14

This scenario of "nuclear apocalypse by inadvertence" would require some inordinate incompetence at some point. Namely, we can imagine a buggy router which mixes some packets together, and sends the wrong packet to the wrong destination. And then, inexplicably, the military system which receives the packet which, by a stroke of bad luck, contains what that ...


10

"The best algorithm to achieve this"? Define "best". A simple A* algorithm will generate the most efficient possible path for an enemy to take to reach the player, but would you really want to play against a perfect computer? That's a recipe for frustration right there. The Pac-Man "AI" was actually 4 very simple algorithms that told the 4 ghosts where ...


9

Unit tests don't test gameplay. There's no programmatic criteria to see if a game is fun, or a level is the right difficulty. Unit tests will test that your roguelike mapgen actually produces a level with a stairs up and a stairs down. It will test that your encumberance rules are setup that your character actually moves slower when weighted. It will make ...


7

I am a chess engine developer so I can tell you - neither approach is acceptable. A professional chess game always almost do it in some kind of special data structure such as a mailbox or bitboard. Why? For example to find out the moves for a bishop, you would have to loop through the squares that the piece can move on an empty board while checking for enemy ...


7

This is just a theory, but I think it is due to the compulsive nature of games and gamers. They love to play games for hours on end and they're creating a product that has a goal of the user being engaged as long as possible. My guess is people in the movie and music industry run into similar hours. Try to imagine someone who creates business software ...


5

Games are written on a prospective basis - it is hoped that people will pay to play. Games don't make money until they hit the shelves - a delay in shipping can kill (and has killed) development companies or publishing companies. Games are surprisingly low-margin - the retail price is split between the retailer, the software company, the publishing company, ...


4

So there are several things that need to happen in order for such an event to occur: A game has to have a sequence of packets that match the protocol for say launching a nuclear missile (or the packets the game sends gets corrupted somehow to match the protocol) The packets have to be routed incorrectly to the server responsible for launching the nuke The ...


3

The basic approach is: Identify all the factors. Assign a weight to each factor. If the factor itself has a scale, assign a scaling formula (eg linear, log, capped, whatever) based on additional weights. If there are dependencies, express those as a formula based on additional weights. Add up all the resulting values. The problem now is that you have a ...


2

Is my simulated annealing algorithm correct? This is not Simulated Annealing, what you describe is called Stochastic Hill Climbing. SA will also accept new configurations with a certain probability when they are worse than the old configuration (and lower that probability over time). You did not specify how exactly you calculate "error count", and, as ...


2

If you are talking about having one thread for every game character, you're going to have some synchronization issues. And you might start running into performance issues if you have many game characters, each requiring its own thread. If you really want to do things in parallel, you could do try to run multiple threads all performing the same task. For ...


2

It is hard to write unit tests for code that is non-deterministic. If you have code involving random numbers, you won't be able to write a unit test that asserts an expected result. So, unit tests are more appropriate for the code that is deterministic. When I give a method these inputs, I expect these outputs. As an example: when a fighter with 15 strength ...


1

There are many well documented vulnerabilities and attacks that use frames. OWASP has a good list of them here with examples: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Cross_Frame_Scripting Generally, users should always be wary of any frame content especially Cross-Origin frames. Frames, including iframe, have undoubtedly been one of the largest vulnerabilities in ...


1

I should think a data mining approach would work, probably with a neural network to map inputs (user actions) to outputs (game win/ loose). Record many games and use these to train the neural net. At run time let this trained 'net decide what's important and produce a numeric measure, which you graph.


1

There are still some questions open regarding your game and your question. So, I put in small answers here to questions already arising from what you have given as information: Get your animations for your actions in the right schedule: Write a scheduler that starts animations with a given start-up time so that actions will have a smooth look. For example ...


1

Does anyone know about this theory and if it had a name? "Scare mongering", "B grade Hollywood movie plot", "Vested Interests" come to mind. has anything like this happened in software. The Ariane 5 rocket failure, and the AT&T long distance crash in 1990 were caused my something remotely similar to this - as far as both were caused by incorrect ...


1

It wouldn't be a stretch for the military to hire a game development company to work on something for them. I doubt they would start from scratch, so there would be similar code whether they knew it or not. The game could be designed to host its own shared game over the Internet and even reach out to other games. Of course they would exclude that feature ...



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