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19

Everyone wants to make video games. It sounds awesome. This creates competition among prospects. The employers set the conditions of competition, which in this case has turned into a "who can take the most crap" competition.


15

This scenario of "nuclear apocalypse by inadvertence" would require some inordinate incompetence at some point. Namely, we can imagine a buggy router which mixes some packets together, and sends the wrong packet to the wrong destination. And then, inexplicably, the military system which receives the packet which, by a stroke of bad luck, contains what that ...


14

To expand on @gms8994's answer, it's well known that you get what you measure. In this case, achievements would be considered a type of measurement. So, unless those achievements in the IDE are perfectly suited for your business, you won't be getting what you really want from developers. Personally, I think the only measurement that should be applied to ...


14

In the enterprise world, an algorithm always functions the same way. I'll write a unit test for an algorithm, I'll expect the value 42 and it'll error if I don't get that value. This is not very different in games. The presence of two modes and multiple flags in the game you're working on doesn't change anything: if you take a specific mode with a ...


11

I wouldn't say it was the first. Core War at least has been around since 1984. Core War (or Core Wars) is a programming game in which two or more battle programs (called "warriors") compete for the control of the "Memory Array Redcode Simulator" virtual computer ("MARS"). These battle programs are written in an abstract assembly language called Redcode. At ...


9

Unit tests don't test gameplay. There's no programmatic criteria to see if a game is fun, or a level is the right difficulty. Unit tests will test that your roguelike mapgen actually produces a level with a stairs up and a stairs down. It will test that your encumberance rules are setup that your character actually moves slower when weighted. It will make ...


7

This is just a theory, but I think it is due to the compulsive nature of games and gamers. They love to play games for hours on end and they're creating a product that has a goal of the user being engaged as long as possible. My guess is people in the movie and music industry run into similar hours. Try to imagine someone who creates business software ...


7

I personally disagree; one of the "achievements" was Every Option Considered – Created an enum with more than 30 values. I think people would write crappy code just to get the achievement. That makes life that much harder on the next schmuck who has to maintain it.


6

The "impenetrable barrier" is a result of the growing industry/community/ecosystem and the requirements for participating in it meaningfully. It's a social thing, not a technical thing. If you want to do things the way they were in the 80s and 90s, there's nothing stopping you -- just that the end result obviously won't be competitive with modern offerings. ...


5

Games are written on a prospective basis - it is hoped that people will pay to play. Games don't make money until they hit the shelves - a delay in shipping can kill (and has killed) development companies or publishing companies. Games are surprisingly low-margin - the retail price is split between the retailer, the software company, the publishing company, ...


5

You should make games! Lots of games. In EVERYTHING. You say you've used Unity a fair bit; have you made and released a complete game in it by yourself? That'd be a great place to start. Start small... really small, like Asteroids small, and make a finished game. Then make another. Try different technologies and ideas until you work out what you like. ...


5

The popularity come first from exposure: the Minecraft community isn't small and there is a non-insignificant subset of them that likes to mess around with specifics and technicalities and would see imlpementing the DCPU-16 emulator as a personal challenge. Second, it's a very compact specification geared towards easy implementation (*). I'd be able to ...


5

Short answer: No. Long answer: Nonononononononononono. No. IDEs cannot really gauge what is worthy of achievement: those things that make a programmer great. IDEs are slowly getting better at helping you identify bad code 'smells', but such functionality is in its infancy. Until IDEs can detect and suggest major project refactoring opportunities that ...


4

Not sure if this is really the right location, but I'll bite. If you look at the popular facebook games (Mobwars/Mafiawars) and the like, they all follow a basic formula. Action Points: You have a certain number of action points that regenerate over time Tasks: You use action points to complete tasks Resources: The tasks you complete give you resources ...


4

So there are several things that need to happen in order for such an event to occur: A game has to have a sequence of packets that match the protocol for say launching a nuclear missile (or the packets the game sends gets corrupted somehow to match the protocol) The packets have to be routed incorrectly to the server responsible for launching the nuke The ...


3

First, there is one important thing to remember: use the correct tool for the job. If you want to do a simple operation once (like renaming a bunch of files according to some logic), you can safely ignore pretty much any rule of programming. Using a small script written in bash (or PowerShell, or Python) is more than enough. But, if you are writing a big ...


3

I learned to program in the 1980's, first of all in BASIC on a TRS-80 Color Computer. And yes, I'm certain it was vastly more accessible than it is for kids today to get started with things you mention such as C++, WinAPI, DirectX, OpenGL, XNA, etc. But the thing is, those languages, libraries and frameworks are serious tools for serious business. They have ...


3

"most of these modern design patterns, 'pure' paradigms, and obsession with platform independence are a real distraction from actually writing fun code" True. If. By "fun code", you mean code you could never sell and don't expect to support for very long or for very many customers. Personal projects don't have to be portable. No reason. If, on the ...


3

I've never sold an app, but why not take a look at the most popular Android app? Angry Birds has a paid version in the Apple store, and a free ad-supported version in the Android Market and the Amazon Android app store. They've also recently added paid versions without ads to the Amazon Android app store. (Many Android developers take this route of having ...


3

Android users don't buy apps. That market for android paid apps is about 6% of the market for iPhone apps. Selling apps on Android is also more of a hassle. Ad supported is the better way to go on Android. On iPhone do both, make a ad supported Lite version and a full version for $0.99.


3

The basic approach is: Identify all the factors. Assign a weight to each factor. If the factor itself has a scale, assign a scaling formula (eg linear, log, capped, whatever) based on additional weights. If there are dependencies, express those as a formula based on additional weights. Add up all the resulting values. The problem now is that you have a ...


2

If the two Combatant instances and Weather object are notified as the result of the clock tick count being updated, and not by direct intervention by the Fight object, then it's the Observer pattern. If your Fight object triggers the notifications directly you can use the Command pattern to encapsulate the receivers or have the Fight object send messages ...


2

There was a Dungeons and Dragons game I remember playing in the 80's that was MS-DOS based. You had hit points and moved across a text based NxN board/maze. You picked up weapons, magical devices, and other things along the way. It seemed like it would be easy to implement; the board just refreshed after every move. There wasn't much to it as it was just ...


2

Garry's Mod uses Valves Source Engine and has Lua scripting support. Arma 2 and Arma 2 Operation Arrowhead(stand alone expansion) make heavy use of a scripting engine that doesn't really have an official name but most people call it ArmaScript, it's got a python type syntax. This would be my recommendation for you because Arma 2/OA is basically a military ...


2

Get a new job in a non-game software field, and attach yourself to an existing non commercial game project of your choice. There are lots of them, but don't expect to be welcomed as the messiah. You'll have to prove your chops, mostly by longevity and persistence. The web is littered with enthusiastic volunteers who absorb a lot of energy but don't last ...


2

If you are talking about having one thread for every game character, you're going to have some synchronization issues. And you might start running into performance issues if you have many game characters, each requiring its own thread. If you really want to do things in parallel, you could do try to run multiple threads all performing the same task. For ...


2

It is hard to write unit tests for code that is non-deterministic. If you have code involving random numbers, you won't be able to write a unit test that asserts an expected result. So, unit tests are more appropriate for the code that is deterministic. When I give a method these inputs, I expect these outputs. As an example: when a fighter with 15 strength ...


1

There are still some questions open regarding your game and your question. So, I put in small answers here to questions already arising from what you have given as information: Get your animations for your actions in the right schedule: Write a scheduler that starts animations with a given start-up time so that actions will have a smooth look. For example ...


1

Does anyone know about this theory and if it had a name? "Scare mongering", "B grade Hollywood movie plot", "Vested Interests" come to mind. has anything like this happened in software. The Ariane 5 rocket failure, and the AT&T long distance crash in 1990 were caused my something remotely similar to this - as far as both were caused by ...


1

It wouldn't be a stretch for the military to hire a game development company to work on something for them. I doubt they would start from scratch, so there would be similar code whether they knew it or not. The game could be designed to host its own shared game over the Internet and even reach out to other games. Of course they would exclude that feature ...



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