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11

If you are putting source code available to the public, then yes, you do need to be aware of the licenses that your third-party libraries are released under. Even if you don't put them into your GitHub repository, the licenses of those libraries may force you to license your project under certain licenses simply because you are using the other third-party ...


3

Would your application function normally without the GPLv2 licensed code? If it can't, then you can't do it. You have to open your source. The FSF interprets your application falling on its head as "The GPLv2 code is an integral part of your application, and therefore your program and the GPLv2 code are collectively considered a 'derived work.'" If your ...


2

In general, the principle is that you cannot revoke the GPL license, once it is applied to a particular version of a software. If you choose to release your software under a new version using a different license, you're certainly free to do that, but all older releases of the code would still fall under the GPL.


2

If the contributors of changes agree to a Contributor License Agreement (CLA), then the project owner holds all of the copyright. In essence, contributors can be asked to give up their rights to own the contributions. They may continue to receive credit for their contributions, but depending on the wording of the agreement, may cause them to assign copyright ...


1

License and copyright are two very different things. GPL, in general, makes sure that any derivative works are still GPL. If you add new code to code that is GPL, that will still be GPL, but you have the copyright to the new code, and can put that into a copyright notice in your files (and you should do that). That will not do much for you, except that ...


1

First of all you need to worry about legalities only if you wish to distribute your code. If it is for personal use or for an internal app for your organization you can go ahead and make any changes and integration you wish. And even if you want to distribute your code, what you need to do is fine by GPLv2. To quote from the license ...


1

The iOS App store guidelines and OS security sandbox do not allow spawning a separate process from an app, and in fact iOS reported to hunt and kill any attempts by an app to try to start additional processes. So even if using a separate process was a legal exception, it can't be done within a single iOS App store app.


1

Note that if you try to do this, you cannot make use of any GPL licensed code, since using such code requires you to license any derived work with the GPL. (You can of course use GPL licensed code and commit copyright infringement; if you then take anyone to court for using your code and they tell the judge that you are already committing copyright ...



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