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5

The GPL licence does not requires you to publish the modifications. It only requires that if you provide the software to someone, you should provide him the source code and the right to distribute it. I suppose that you will use the code internally only (which applies even if you have external user, you don't distribute them the software, so you don't have ...


3

If you are an intern, that question is not one that you should even try to answer. Your boss should be made aware that you want to use this GPL licensed software, and he needs to agree with it. If he agrees, you are fine. If he doesn't agree, don't use the GPL licensed software. If using the software forces your boss to do something that he doesn't want to ...


2

Short answer: Yes, you must attribute. The AGPL (especially v3) is about as unambiguous as it gets. Not only do you need to fully attribute the source, it's a near-certainty (especially with v3) that your code will come under the AGPL whether you like it or not. If you really have 'read half the internet', then you should know this. It sounds like you are ...


1

If you run the code on your own servers without distributing it, you don't have to release your source code. If you distribute your code which links to the GPL code, then you must release your source code. If you distribute any modified GPL code, you have to release the modifications, even if your code does not link to it. Technically I think this means ...


1

I am not a lawyer but my understanding is that as long as you are not distributing the software, you don't need to do anything special. You are free to use it for commercial uses. This license was created before the concept of the cloud and the AGPL was created to address this loophole: http://www.gnu.org/licenses/why-affero-gpl.en.html



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