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6

Yes, you can release the portions that you own (in this case, the library before modifications were made by other contributors) under one or more other licenses. Those other licenses could be anything that you want, from other open source licenses to specific licenses to other people or organizations. If you are producing a library that is meant to be ...


5

You can charge a fee for software covered by the GNU GPL. It's totally fine. The GNU project encourages you to charge what you can. GNU's "Free Software" philosophy is "about freedom, not price". If you provide binaries to a customer, you also must provide source (or access to source). You don't have to provide the source to non-customers. You do have to ...


3

I am not a lawyer, and this is not legal advice: In the US as regards to software there are generally two kinds of IP you need to worry about: Patents and Copyrights. If an algorithm published in an academic paper is patented then you cannot use it -- the ideas and methods themselves are protected intellectual property. You would need to license it from ...


3

The GPL license does not forbid you to ask money for obtaining your program. However, when using the GPL, there is usually not much sense in asking money, because users of your program must have the right to re-distribute the program either in its original form or after making changes to it. Due to this, once you have sold your first copy, you have a ...


2

The fact that the code is GPL licensed affects what you are allowed to do with that code. It does not affect what you are allowed to do with the paper, or what code you are allowed to write yourself. Unless the paper itself came with some kind of license stating "you may not create closed-source implementations of this algorithm or modified versions ...


2

You don't have to distribute the source code at all until someone asks for it. But if you choose not to distribute it along with the executable, you do have to provide a "written offer" for the source code, which I assume would have to include instructions on how to contact you and ask for it. From the GPL v2 preamble: You must make sure that they, too, ...


2

Yes, as @ThomasOwens said, you can use the portions that you own (that you wrote) in a closed-source, non-gpl app. I think what clarifies this, but hasn't been mentioned, is the distinction between license and copyright. You, the author of the code, own its copyright despite licensing the code under gpl. In fact, you should immediately, if not sooner, go to ...


1

You can charge any amount that you like for the software. You can charge your cost for providing the source code for the software. You may not charge any money for the license to the software. If you always give people the software together with the source code, then you have no other obligations towards anyone. The same happens when the source code is ...


1

I am not a lawyer, this is my understanding of the situation but it is not legal advice. If you want that pay a lawyer. I'm also basing this on GPLv2, the principles are mostly the same in GPLv3 but there may be differences in the details. I understand that my source code must be freely available. Not exactly, basically you must either provide the ...



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