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There are several methodologies that have evolved over the years to deal with these issues you've mentioned, which are, I agree, the two main issues that UI frameworks have had to address in recent years. Coming from a WPF background, these are approached as follows: Declarative design, rather than imperative When you describe painstakingly writing code to ...


5

First, I recommend this article series: http://codebetter.com/jeremymiller/2007/07/26/the-build-your-own-cab-series-table-of-contents/ - it does not address the detail problems with your button code, but it gives you a systematic strategy for designing and implementing your own application framework, especially for GUI applications, showing you how to apply ...


2

Answering in a very abstract and technology/framework agnostic manner, my thinking is as follows What a GUI control is (ie. volume up, volume down) not equates to how it is positioned in a window (a frame of visual reference). Therefore separate the functionality of laying-out from the controls themselves. Use a factory to create various layout managers ...


1

two derived concrete classes for the specifics needed for horizontal-ness vs vertical-ness. This feels the most correct Well, to me this feels mostly wrong. Your button can have a dozen properties or more like the orientation, for example it could be resizable, have a specific color, it could be labeled with an image, text or both, and so on. If you ...


1

As a note up front, I am not familiar with how the Apple UI components commonly work and I mostly have experience working with Qt. This might influence the applicability of my answer. I would start with a set of widgets that are orientation-neutral, but that can naturally be used where you expect an orientation-specific widget. For example a button where ...



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