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56

I used to develop on the production server. It can work fine, but it is inadvisable for at least two reasons: Development code can cause infinite loops, memory leaks, or other problems that lock up the CPU, eat up all the memory, or otherwise affect the server in a way that will impact your production code. If you need to make changes to components of the ...


29

As others have stated, coding on the PROD environment exposes your users to your bugs. Even if you've started a different instance, you've still got shared hardware resources and can still access production files and databases. And as some of the comments point out, if your Dev instance gets hacked (for example, because you forget to wipe it and someone then ...


26

Usually when multiple people need to make changes to the same file, they use some kind of version control system to keep track of who made what changes. It also lets them merge and synchronize the changes different people make.


17

You're planning on doing design work for hire. Unless you really want to be a permanent web host as your full time job (and even if you do, really) you should let your client host their website wherever they want. If you are concerned about your name being on it if they change the design, put a clause in your contact that you can demand they take your name ...


14

Very few websites consist of just one "page" and, for cases where multiple people would work on the same page, most revision control systems have mechanisms built in for merging the changes back together into a unified file.


12

First of all I am sorry to hear of your situation. I hope for the best for you. I'm not going to tell you how to spend your time, but I have a suggestion that could keep your application living on and your family business supported. Open source the application In doing this, you will benefit the wider community, making the assumption of course that this ...


11

The best place I know of to host a Java Web application is on Google App Engine. It scales really well as it's free for low usage. Once you hit your quotas it's then pay as you go. Most Java Web hosting can cost anywhere from $25 per month and up, but Google App Engine is free to start. Our organization hosts many Web applications and Web sites on ...


11

I did try to set up an development environment locally, but I could never get it running. After trying for a while, I gave up and decided to develop on the production server. I DO support the statements to AVOID development on a production server. You may only be justified to do under the GUN, if it is a typo correction in config file and insisted by ...


10

This is really a protocol issue. Generally, this is not something that you would want to be doing. You want to leave production machines alone. They may contain sensitive data, and you don't want to compromise the performance or stability of production sites with non-production ready code. That said, there are times where this is commonly done. If you ...


9

Windows is a second class citizen in most open source communities because it treats them as second class citizens. Development and sysadmin on Windows is unnecessarily painful, especially for people who are used to Unix-based systems. That said, Python on Windows works very well and Django doesn't do anything particularly abnormal so I don't see why you ...


8

Here are the main ones in order of best improvement for time spent. Some of these will be more of a bottleneck depending on what data you're dealing with. Front End: There are easy wins on the front end. Cut down the number of requests with image sprites and aggregating css/js files. Make sure gzip and cache headers are being used. Hardware: Hardware can ...


8

Another important reason not to develop directly in production is that a development instance will usually produce and show verbose errors and stack traces. You never want to expose that to the user. Yes, you can log them instead of showing them to the client, but that makes debugging that much less amusing than it already is. Added Addressing your ...


8

I always try and ask other developers what the procedures are for the particular company. In general yes, you should always: Build locally. Push it to some type of box that mimics production as much as possible to see if it plays nice there. Possibly push it to a QA or certification instance to pass to the client/QA team to review the changes. Push to ...


8

I'm quite astonished no one mentioned the most important reason yet, why it's absolutely forbidden to develop on production servers: Don't mess with production data, which can happen oh so easily! A tiny error in one place leads to gigantic troubles in other calculations and then, on the next day, all the data is garbage and the customer is pissed. This is ...


7

The answer to use an ORM that allows you to abstract that away from the databases themselves. NHibernate is the first that comes to mind, though EF is an acceptable choice is there's an adaptor for the DBs you need. I'm not sure how good the support is for DB2, but SQL Server and Oracle work fine. As to stored procedures and trigger: don't use them. As ...


7

If your customer is a business person, he/she is likely not understand what do you mean by most of the above. In a discussion about security with one customer, I received the question "and why would they go after my business anyway, I am no bank?". I would suggest that you: Make a list of threats (like the ones you mentioned above) and what effect could ...


7

I'm sorry about the situation you face, and I hope you are around to maintain the site for much longer than you expect. This is a little bit hard to answer without knowing exactly what your site does, but most of the functions I imagine a beauty shop would have can be replaced with free or low cost, easy to use software. Publicity/Information There are ...


6

Unless you have a previous agreement (i.e. a contract) that covers this, you probably have little choice in the matter from a legal stand-point. (Talk to an IP / Copyright lawyer) If the client changes anything on the site that compromises my design work, it will reflect my business. my business name will be on the homepage of the website. Is this a ...


6

For ASP.NET web application, you can have several options: 1-Deploy on a user workstation - This is a bad solution for a serious application. You will get unpredictable performance, problems in debugging and possibly security issues, to name a few of the troubles. 2-Deploy the web server and database server both on a dedicated machine owned by the company ...


5

Accoring to this report , the number 1 reason why startups' fail is premature scaling. Its not a wise solution to spend a lot on scalibility until you have not reached a point where you need it. Scale your application on a 'as per needed' bases. Start small (VPS), keep costs low, monitor your growth and expand as and when you need. Its not difficult to ...


5

I'd prefer contacting the service provider first, just in case some of the issues are easily solvable from their side. Their response could range from "no to everything" to "yes to everything, without additional charge", but it will probably be somewhere in the middle ("we can fix this and that, but we'll have to charge you a small fee"). If their response ...


5

My sense here is that its better if the customer hosts. If you host everything, you may be able to squeak out some hosting fees, but you also end up responsible for server outages and database crashes... and basically every other glitch that occurs with the site (real or imagined by the customer). Unless you have a strong set of server administration ...


4

Comparing hosting is like comparing dentists: there are plenty to choose from, everyone has a favorite and everyone recommends his/her own. And unfortunately just like with dentists, you need to find yours via trial and error rather than others' recommendations. You can probably start with various reviews and ratings available on the Internet. One ...


4

One option would be to get a Linux virtual server and install the software of your choice on it (that might even let you stick with Oracle products if that's your preference). If that's a little too much setup and administration for you, you could look at using Bitnami's TomStack. (There are some Amazon EC2 Machine Images listed at the bottom - inlcuding ...


4

Right Thinking. Every server have the internet connection from different provider, so for example a. if any of the internet providers gets down, or b. there occur any hardware or power failure, the website still runs, without a break and without any data loss. For that, if you rely on multiple hosting services, then it will be hard to maintain ...


4

On high pressure projects people keep things in perspective by reminding themselves 'it's only software, nobody died'. Sadly you won't be able to develop a cure for yourself. Your family won't be able to learn support the application. Perhaps they need you to help them develop an application using technologies they know - pen and paper, ledgers and cardex, ...


3

This is just my opinion but.... How many users are you expecting? Do you expect to get 100 users hitting the site at the same moment? How about 1000users? or 10k? nginx can handle 1k-10kusers depending on your machine with very little cpu/ram until it gets up to 10k per user at the same moment. Then cpu will be a bottleneck. Also how complex is your ...


3

They need some kind of manager. Typically, teams are broken up into segments that should never interfere with each other (famous last words). For instance, if the foo API depends on helpers from the people who code in C, the breakage should (never happen), but if it does, it happens because the helper app doesn't understand what you are passing to it. ...



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