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4

You're not seeing requests because it's not making any; the page is maintaining an open Web Socket connection to the server, and the updates are being pushed from the server to your browser, rather than downloaded at your browser's request.


2

When the information is important, you should put it into the body. Why? proxy servers are allowed to modify headers. Many are configured to strip any headers they don't know. This, however, only applies when you use unencrypted HTTP. When you use HTTPS, the proxy can't change the headers because they are encrypted. When you use a webservice, you usually ...


4

Hypermedia never really got popular with REST-like APIs - to the point that when an API actually implements hypermedia navigation, the term RESTful simply isn't enough to distinguish it from any other "RESTful" web APIs. REST has become an catch-all term or any resource-based web APIs and new names like Hypermedia API have been coined to focus on ...


1

You can call it a Web API. It's a very broad term but it can avoid nitpicking about meaning of other API type definitions. The term is less technical and precise compared to alternatives like HTTP API, but that might be an advantage when talking to non-technical people. This term is also used by Leonard Richardson (who defined the Richardson Maturity Model ...


1

You can call it whatever you like, people tend to (almost religiously) latch onto any part of the REST 'spec' that you're not following and use that as a point of protest which is highly detrimental to the development. But that said, the simple fact is that there are (nearly) zero services exist that implement true REST for their API serves. In our team we ...


30

Call it an HTTP API. It conforms to HTTP standards, and doesn't have anything else layered on top (e.g. SOAP). The HTTP standards define resources, verbs, headers, content negotiation, etc. REST (REpresentational State Transfer) is an architecture with requirements that happen to be amenable to existing HTTP standards, but HTTP works on all its own. ...


17

Richardson Maturity Models goes like this POST everywhere. A single endpoint. (SOAP) POST everywhere. Multiple endpoints. (resources) HTTP VERBS. Multiple endpoints. Like 2 and returns links to resources. (RESTful) So according to the model I would call it a webservice conforming to richardson level 2 or something along those lines. ...


2

It is a CRUD interface (Create, Read, Update, Delete) over HTTP. I can't think of any authorities to back it up this assertion, so I hope you get more and better answers.


1

You can't detect that an iFrame is making the request directly. You can, of course, pass parameters in the URL to allow you to make the distinction. Since the use of iFrames is downplayed, if not actively deprecated, you may want to revisit your idea.


0

1 key, 1 object will be more predictable regarding interaction with app server and possible session replication techniques. Not sure what you mean by "set of final static String" being necessary. You may manage session keys any way you like. Consider you have 20 preferences, and perhaps your preferences class has an enum of preference names. Could ...


3

According to the documentation, anonymous information about the user's system is sent with an update request. I'd say that technically your colleagues are correct. This info doesn't appear to be used to affect the response to the request, so it doesn't really belong there. A better way to send that info would probably be to POST to a separate resource, ...


3

RFC 7231, Section 4.3.1: A payload within a GET request message has no defined semantics; sending a payload body on a GET request might cause some existing implementations to reject the request. So in short, sending a payload is indeed incorrect. As far as REST goes, use POST if you're creating an item, and PATCH for partial updates or PUT for full ...


1

The distinction is a matter of degree. Consider the security procedures at a major bank. Every morning the first employe to appear moves a certain potted plant to a subtly different location to signal all other employees "It's okay, there is NOT a criminal gang lurking in the back office trying to kidnap the first two employees to show up and to get them to ...


2

Technically, a formal language (programming languages are a subset of those) is a set of strings that are valid in that language. For a language to be useful, it also has to have semantics, i.e. what does a string in the language mean. For example, print('hello') is a valid string in the language Python and { "name": "zukerman" } is a valid string in the ...


0

The only way I see now is to use REST authentication provided by Amazon It creates expiring URLs that can be given to third-party. So, basically the idea is to login user to your website, check his permissions and then generate URL for him to download file from. AWS IAM also can be used for that, but that limits the number of options, actually.


0

Perhaps you already suggested this with "password to the file": combine option 1 (url to download directly) with encryption of the file, so that it can be securely decrypted by the client application only by clients with possession of a secret key. That is probably a minimum level of security anyway, if you are concerned about security at all. It won't help ...



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