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377

The answer is (I'll be bold and say) always NO. Develop on the best you can get with your budget, and test on the min-max spec range of equipment you'll deploy to. There's emulators, virtual machines, actual machines with testers that can all test performance to see if it's a factor.


235

Absolutely It's also true that managers should conduct all meetings in Pig-Latin. It improves their communication skills overall to have them disadvantaged when speaking simple sentences. They'll have to rely more on facial expressions and body language to get their point across and we all know that is at least 70% of all communication anyways. CFOs ...


90

"Now orders, without discussion, have come down that everyone is to switch to Eclipse." I think that this is the real red flag. Your team is the expert on software development and the one to be affected by the decision, and yet you did not get to say a word in the discussion that resulted in this order? It sounds like over-managing by pointy-haired ...


78

By using a debugger. For the most part, this is also what an IDE does behind the scenes -- it just wraps the experience in a GUI. On Unix, one of the most commonly used debuggers is GNU gdb, which has largely supplanted the earlier Unix debuggers such as dbx. To get an idea of what debugging looks like / feels like from the command line, you can look at ...


71

Understanding the concepts and memorising dozens of hundreds of stupid library classes and methods are two completely different things. Intellisense helps to kick all that useless knowledge off from your mind completely, and the earlier you do it, the better. Leave more space for the useful concepts, don't waste your limited resources on APIs. To answer an ...


70

1) Very, very unlikely.No, and your developers may put something nasty in your coffee for suggesting it. Time your developers spend waiting for the code to compile or for the IDE to do whatever it's doing or whatever is time they're not spending making the code better. Disrupts their mental flow, too. Keep their minds on the problem, and they'll be much ...


63

I work with Intellij (9.0.4 Ultimate) and Eclipse (Helios) every day and Intellij beats Eclipse every time. How? Because Intellij indexes the world and everything just works intuitively. I can navigate around my code base much, much faster in Intellij. F3 (type definition) works on everything - Java, JavaScript, XML, XSD, Android, Spring contexts. ...


63

It is reasonable that when you working together on a common project, that on every workstation you have all the tools available to edit/build/debug your software, and that the core tools for doing about 90% of the development are known to everyone in the team. That goal is harder to achieve if your team is growing and everyone uses his personal favorite ...


62

The main reasons why I prefer a terminal-based editor over a full-fledged IDE: Remote access. I can ssh to whatever computer I need to be on, fire up Vim and start working away. In a day-to-day basis, using screen session and Vim allows for easy access from any location. Keystrokes. There are so many keystrokes saved once you can utilise Emacs or Vim to a ...


60

Coding standards are not just about the favored parameters for indent -- they also include naming conventions, commenting conventions, and a large number of possible recommendations for idioms, language feature use, etc. More to the point, you still need to document all this somewhere. And finally, not everyone will want to use an IDE that reformats code ...


51

Nobody mentioned being able to quickly look at an exception stack trace to find out where an exception occurred.


50

Displayed line numbers are essential for paired-programming. There is no faster way to direct your pair's eyes to the code you are thinking about. By extension, line-numbers are also extremely useful for code-reviews, both formal and informal.


49

Programmers are notorious for using the tools that helps them get the job done in the most efficient way possible. These editors are ancient yet still being used because they are good, solid editors, proven by time. If they get the job done and get the job done well, why should we drop them in favor of something else?


48

The I: integration. A good text editor may be nice for writing code, but most of your programming isn't spent writing; it's spent testing and debugging, and for that you want your text editor to integrate with your compiler and your debugger. That's the greatest strength of an IDE.


48

Provided the 'official' build system (as used by the Continuous Build servers) is the same for all, I don't see any reason why each member of the team could not choose the tools he wants...


44

If by "dev++" you mean this monstrosity, then drop it as fast as you can. There have been no updates to Dev-C++ in over six years, it's buggy, comes with a really ancient version of gcc and is not worth the cost of the download. Visual C++, on the other hand, is a world-class compiler and one of the best the IDEs available. That you can get it for free is ...


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41

You assume they don't evolve. Emacs continues to grow by leaps and bounds; and, while vi was getting kind of hoary, Vim has rejuvenated it and if anything it's growing (feature-wise at least) faster than Emacs. But when it comes down to it, it's what you work best with that matters. If you're most productive in Eclipse, more power to you. Same if you ...


40

I had some thoughts on online editors, but my internet connection is down so I can't remember them.


33

This is a terrible idea. You want your developers to be as productive as possible, which means giving them as fast a machine as possible, so they don't sit around all day waiting for things to compile. (Slightly OT, but it also helps not to block their access to potentially helpful sites with WebSense and the like.) If you are constrained by having users ...


33

These are my favorite features of my favorite IDE, IntelliJ, which I like using for Java, PHP, Javascript, HTML, even ActionScript. Error checking - Like live spell check for code. Absolutely essential. Code navigation - Ctrl+click on a function, variable, type to go to the definition. (IntelliJ is very good at this in all of the above languages) Code ...


33

Calculate how much hours you save with this per week. Multiply the amount with your workweeks per year. Multiply this with the amount of money they pay you per hour. Subtract the price of VS2012 Prof. from the result.


32

I don't think its necessarily the advanced features of VIM that make it so powerful. Its the fact that you never have to take your hands off the keyboard to do anything. Finding something in a huge file is as simple as a couple of keystrokes. Opening and closing multiple files in the same window is incredibly fast as well. While it may not seem intuitive at ...


32

Development should be done in the best environment that is feasible. Testing should be done in the worst environment that is feasible.


32

However, there are many different tools and IDEs that will format to whatever standard the programmer prefers. Good luck with that. My experience, there are a tiny number of tools (zero!) that can properly reformat code from format X to format Y. There are just too many things that get in the way. Tabs vs spaces, multi-line statements, etc. Just look at ...


31

I was a candidate 2 in an interview very recently. I was given a vanilla install of the IDE on a PC with a non-standard keyboard and unfamiliar testing framework, and I was asked to write a simple Fizz-Buzz app with unit tests. I fluffed it. I must have looked like a complete noob, stumbling around in the dark trying to hack out code. Needless to say, I ...


31

The idea of being dependent on an IDE to understand code at such a basic level seems anathema. It is not a question of understanding your code: given sufficient time, you can always locate the right variable with a basic text editor or even in a printout. As far as understanding the code goes, the IDE dependency absolutely does not exist. Locating your ...


30

Emacs and Vi still have a place. They are ubiquitously available in Unix and Unix-like environments, and can be installed on most other popular platforms. They are popular and stable, so learning them once pays off over the long run. They run over a text terminal, so you can use them in telnet and ssh sessions. They provide editing modes and syntax ...


30

Here is my personal experience with IDEs. I installed all IDEs I could find, and played with them all (that is what I would advise you to do) : kdevelop I personally use it. The version I have installed crashes, but I downloaded the latest version from their site, and it works good. It is simple to configure and great to use. They support custom build ...



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