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In general, you should include information about known defects in release notes to inform your users. You can see many software vendors have public bug trackers, so it obviously is a common practice. Reasons to have a list of known issues: Issue may never be fixed, because newer major version of software is going to be released. That newer version may be ...


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Yes. Otherwise, your customers may find those bugs themselves, and give you bug reports for things you've already fixed. This wastes everybody's time. In addition, bugs may be causing your customers problems that they are unaware of. Getting notice of these issues may induce them to upgrade more quickly, reducing the scope of the issue. (Imagine for ...


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I think the solution of this problem is to let team create Issues/bugs within user story, just like tasks. Yodiz (www.yodiz.com) easily resolve this issue by allowing you to create Issues on Sprint board and assign them to a user story. Also same issue can be seen on Yodiz built-in issue tracker so now you can see the same issue at two places on your issue ...


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Synopsis: Exceptions are evidence of bad outcomes, bugs are (some of the) causes of bad outcomes. The problem (to be solved) isn't the exception, the problem is what caused the exception. Resoning: A bug is a defect in the design or implementation of a product (not limited to software). For example, not using a properly rated relay ...


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You might legitimately raise an exception yourself, you would hopefully never introduce a bug on purpose.


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All exceptions are not bugs. It can be a topic of debate that all bugs are exceptions or not. We can say exceptions are the events that are not part of the normal or expected flow of application. These events can be independent of how the code is written where as a bug is essentially result of bad code(like wrong calculation). Here is an example of how not ...


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Since this question has been re-opened for a bounty, let me mention my CUJ article from 2003 entitled "An Exception or a Bug?", which seems to address exactly the OP's question. Basically, the article defines the terms "bug" and "exception" (giving examples), and proposes strategies for dealing with each. The article proposes not to "handle" bugs but ...


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I think some transparency is needed. Customers are expecting it and it can separate you from a competitor that doesn't take that extra step. For example, you may want your customers to see the status of their request, such as "open" or "closed" in their interface. On the other hand, the admin could have a wider array of statuses that would be invisible to ...



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