Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

42

I'll suggest a new one, Sleeper Cell. Seems apt to me. A sleeper cell refers to a cell, or isolated grouping of sleeper agents that belong to an intelligence network or organization. The cell "sleeps" (lies dormant) inside a target population until it receives orders or decides to act


39

Latent bug Latent: "potentially existing but not presently evident or realized"


39

A Duck From http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2012/07/new-programming-jargon.html: A feature added for no other reason than to draw management attention and be removed, thus avoiding unnecessary changes in other aspects of the product.


25

It's simply referred to as inefficient. Efficiency/performance: the amount of system resources a program consumes (processor time, memory space, slow devices such as disks, network bandwidth and to some extent even user interaction): the less, the better. This also includes correct disposal of some resources, such as cleaning up temporary files and lack of ...


17

Actually in manufacturing (and quality assurance) there is something called a Red Rabbit Test (aka Red Herring) that refers to putting a known bad part into the machine or process and making sure it's detected. Some automated machines have automatic cycles (typically once per shift) where it prompts the operator to load the "red rabbit" part and then it ...


16

I and a few others I have worked with call those a Timebomb. I know that this would give it a dual meaning; often "timebomb" is used for a piece of malicious code put in by a programmer that is set to go off at a certain point in time. However, when no circumstances seem to change other than the time (as you said had happened with your bug) then "timebomb" ...


14

I think you've hit on an important question. We don't have good words to describe unnecessary computation. One word is "bottleneck". That seems to describe something localized, that traffic has to get through, and limits the speed. The trouble is, in decades of performance tuning, I've found and fixed numerous problems, and none of them fit that image. ...


10

A Cicada That's my nickname for it anyways. Cicadas are insects that spend most of their lives hidden underground. They then suddenly bore to the surface to spread their wings and wreak havoc! Alternate pronunciation: Sick-a-duh!


10

Martin Fowler's Refactoring book identifies long methods as a code smell, with the Extract Method refactor being a solution. I think it could also be considered a derivative of the Single Responsibility Principle. Applying it at the method level can make unit-testing much easier, since you don't have to worry about testing multiple results from a single ...


7

A proxy, in its most general form, is a class functioning as an interface to something else. The proxy could interface to anything: a network connection, a large object in memory, a file, or some other resource that is expensive or impossible to duplicate. - Wikipedia In the very context you quote, it means that said methods serve to ...


6

I call these sorts of bugs "Submarine Bugs", sort of like "Submarine Patents", something that is present, but unseen until it surfaces. The other kinds of bugs mentioned, like Heisenbugs, and Schrodingbugs are quite different in that they are bugs that you are know are there, but change during observation.


6

According to wikipedia they're called "upvalues". A closure allows a function to access variables outside its immediate lexical scope. An upvalue is a free variable that has been bound (closed over) with a closure. The closure is said to "close over" its upvalues. Although it's probably better to wrongly call them private variables so people will ...


6

A dormant bug - Heraldic, so dormant bug as opposed to a rampant bug that is right now affecting EVERYTHING. Also has a nod to dormant and active volcanoes and super volcanoes like Yelowstone park.. (image credit, Wikicommons, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lion_Dormant.svg)


5

It means that the program/application runs on the .NET Framework. The .NET Framework includes a large library and provides language interoperability across several programming languages. Programs written for .NET Framework execute in the Common Language Runtime (CLR), an application virtual machine that provides services such as security, memory ...


4

Desktop Application Development or Rich Client Development come to mind...


4

You're looking for mutation testing. The idea of mutation testing is to check that the code can be modified to cause the testing to fail, as you have pointed out. An example is as such: public double getDiscountedRate(int age, int employmentDurationInMonths) { return age < 30 || employmentDurationInMonths < 18 ? 0.2 : 0.05; } So if we have this ...


3

The classifications I've always known are Web Development Desktop Development Mobile Development Embedded Systems Development Database Development (Stored Procs, etc.) Client-Server Development (Not used as frequently as it once was)


3

I still see quite a few ads for Desktop Application Development. I think you might get more play if you specify the platform - Windows Application Development or OSX Application Development, for example, along with the languages (eg, C++) and libraries/frameworks (eg, Qt), so something like: Developed applications for Windows using C++ in Qt 4.5


3

Sounds like an extreme version of Modularization this kind of obsessive refactoring is counterproductive. That's called "Modularize, not atomize" ;-)


3

Seems like my professors called it bebugging or fault seeding. The idea is that if you wanted to estimate the population of something like fish in a lake, you could catch some, tag and release them, give them time to assimilate randomly with the other fish, then estimate the population based on how many tagged fish you catch later. This search link finds a ...


3

There was a special terminology that just evolved at a company I used to work out. Many of the developers since have moved on and seemingly have spread the language. Pixies: when things mysteriously break, seeming with(out) reason. Fairies: when things that were once broken mysteriously fix themselves, seeming with(out) reason i.e. "The damn pixies are at ...


2

Sometimes a quick and temporary fix is applied to restrict an application to deal with a serious bug. It's a temporary patch, and not a fix. When the fix is a priority, it is often fast tracked and released immediately after the temporary solution. This could typically be called a fast follower. Sadly, I think this is more a case of the Pointy Haired ...


2

There are a variety of terms depending on what you're doing. In order of their chances of successful recovery these are: 1. Move to trash You just move the file into a generic "recycle bin". You can fish it out later if you need to. Not secure at all. Perhaps this would be "security by obscurity" if you didn't know where the trashcan was. 2. Delete This ...


2

Personally I'd use the phrase "shredding", though this would imply a secure delete where the data isn't just deleted but overwritten, potentially multiple times using a range of patterns to ensure it can't be recovered again.


2

Hambug? You go along all fat, dumb, and happy enjoying life, until WHAM, heart attack.


2

I've always used Login/Logout without the space. I notice that Microsoft is preferential to Sign in/Sign out.


2

After reading the wikipedia article I would say: Ghost in the Code but I´ve never heard that before.


2

The term that I prefer is Negatively optimised code. Negatively optimised code that forces the processor and/or I/O systems to jump through a number of programmer-created hoops that in no way change the business correctness of the code. Negatively optimised code may be created for any number of reasons. Some good and some bad. Sometimes even following ...


1

How about using a "dormant bug" from Dan McGrath's answer ... ? KM



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible