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45

A Duck From http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2012/07/new-programming-jargon.html: A feature added for no other reason than to draw management attention and be removed, thus avoiding unnecessary changes in other aspects of the product.


21

Actually in manufacturing (and quality assurance) there is something called a Red Rabbit Test (aka Red Herring) that refers to putting a known bad part into the machine or process and making sure it's detected. Red Rabbit Test used to check how long it takes to identify a defect. In this test, a red part is added to the mix and the time until it ...


10

Martin Fowler's Refactoring book identifies long methods as a code smell, with the Extract Method refactor being a solution. I think it could also be considered a derivative of the Single Responsibility Principle. Applying it at the method level can make unit-testing much easier, since you don't have to worry about testing multiple results from a single ...


7

A proxy, in its most general form, is a class functioning as an interface to something else. The proxy could interface to anything: a network connection, a large object in memory, a file, or some other resource that is expensive or impossible to duplicate. - Wikipedia In the very context you quote, it means that said methods serve to ...


7

According to wikipedia they're called "upvalues". A closure allows a function to access variables outside its immediate lexical scope. An upvalue is a free variable that has been bound (closed over) with a closure. The closure is said to "close over" its upvalues. Although it's probably better to wrongly call them private variables so people will ...


5

Seems like my professors called it bebugging or fault seeding. The idea is that if you wanted to estimate the population of something like fish in a lake, you could catch some, tag and release them, give them time to assimilate randomly with the other fish, then estimate the population based on how many tagged fish you catch later. This search link finds a ...


5

It means that the program/application runs on the .NET Framework. The .NET Framework includes a large library and provides language interoperability across several programming languages. Programs written for .NET Framework execute in the Common Language Runtime (CLR), an application virtual machine that provides services such as security, memory ...


4

You're looking for mutation testing. The idea of mutation testing is to check that the code can be modified to cause the testing to fail, as you have pointed out. An example is as such: public double getDiscountedRate(int age, int employmentDurationInMonths) { return age < 30 || employmentDurationInMonths < 18 ? 0.2 : 0.05; } So if we have this ...


4

Desktop Application Development or Rich Client Development come to mind...


3

I have never encountered any such word. Just say "We can turn Module Foo into a plugin" or "We can wrap Module Foo in a plugin". If you're looking for documentation and examples on plugin systems you can start with searching for "plugin design".


3

Sounds like an extreme version of Modularization this kind of obsessive refactoring is counterproductive. That's called "Modularize, not atomize" ;-)


3

The classifications I've always known are Web Development Desktop Development Mobile Development Embedded Systems Development Database Development (Stored Procs, etc.) Client-Server Development (Not used as frequently as it once was)


3

I still see quite a few ads for Desktop Application Development. I think you might get more play if you specify the platform - Windows Application Development or OSX Application Development, for example, along with the languages (eg, C++) and libraries/frameworks (eg, Qt), so something like: Developed applications for Windows using C++ in Qt 4.5


2

I've always used Login/Logout without the space. I notice that Microsoft is preferential to Sign in/Sign out.


2

Sometimes a quick and temporary fix is applied to restrict an application to deal with a serious bug. It's a temporary patch, and not a fix. When the fix is a priority, it is often fast tracked and released immediately after the temporary solution. This could typically be called a fast follower. Sadly, I think this is more a case of the Pointy Haired ...


2

There are a variety of terms depending on what you're doing. In order of their chances of successful recovery these are: 1. Move to trash You just move the file into a generic "recycle bin". You can fish it out later if you need to. Not secure at all. Perhaps this would be "security by obscurity" if you didn't know where the trashcan was. 2. Delete This ...


2

Personally I'd use the phrase "shredding", though this would imply a secure delete where the data isn't just deleted but overwritten, potentially multiple times using a range of patterns to ensure it can't be recovered again.


1

'Make pluggable' is the shortest it can get without inventing new words. Judging by latest Visual Studio and Chrome versions an 'extension' is a more fashionable word these days. Since the hardest bit is supporting plug-ins rather than writing a plug-in, searching for 'extensible architecture' would make more sense. 'Packages' and 'package management' are ...


1

I would say "extract," as in you pull the functionality of this module out of the main codebase and extract it into a plugin.


1

"Fast follower" is a code word for we have already failed because we don't take any calculated risks on implementing our own innovative ideas. It means we won't do anything until someone else has succeeded in doing it and by then it is too late in the game. I worked for a billion dollar a year company that used to espouse this as a virtue. Guess what they ...


1

I forget where I read it, I think it was the Rails company Thoughtbot but the basic idea was to use "Sign" for everything so that there are three actions always: Sign In Sign Out Sign Up This nomenclature makes sense because the basis for authentication is a logbook, so you "sign in" when you enter and "sign out" when you leave.


1

These are all a matter of style (I prefer those with in/out over on/off). Just choose one pair and make sure you use them consistently, and definitely don't mix your terms like Log on / Sign out.



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