Hot answers tagged

764

I interview a lot of people. Some freeze up. Some don't. Here's what I'm looking for. What can I do to be less nervous during my interview? What are you afraid of? Really. This is a hard self-examination question, but you need to know -- specifically -- what terrifies you. 80% of the time it's the "what if I make a mistake?" question. Which is ...


142

I had my second interview with a company here in Omaha last night, and it was easily the longest interview of my life (lasting from 3:00 - 5:30, speaking with 5 people one after another after another). I got some good news this morning: I have a job! Pay = $27/hr, more than twice what I made at my previous employment. Start Date = December 15. Here are ...


109

Get things done. The people that have the power to promote you will only be impressed when they see results. Simply learning many libraries won't be enough to gain you any sort of promotion. It probably will, however, gain you respect from those immediately working with you. Also, don't think of it as 'selling' yourself. It's a case of showing that you're ...


91

Run away, and run away quickly. Unless you're desperate for a job and are very hungry, this is a situation you want to steer clear of. I have experience with a company that did this, and the only reason that they did so was so that their employees wouldn't gain meaningful, transferable experience. It really was all about control. Others who said here ...


90

What can I do to be less nervous during my interview? When you walk in, say "Look, I'm a very good programmer, and my work and experience shows this. But I'm a HORRIBLE interviewee. I'm going to freeze up and squeak like a mouse in a food compactor. Please understand I'm not that way normally and look past this nervousness. Now excuse me while I ...


88

I'm 52, and Technology Director of a company I co-founded 15 years ago, and this is a question close to my heart. I spend about 40% of my time coding, mainly developing existing and new products and I truly hope to be doing the same thing in 10 years time. I'm intrigued by the notion that older programmers are uniquely hampered by irrelevant skillsets. I ...


81

I'm doing 30hrs/week jobs for more than a decade now. In my experience you will not find a niche in the industry where part-time jobs are waiting for you to grab one. Instead, you will have to carve such a job out of the common job market. That's not easy, because many only bargain for money when they interview, so companies are not used to employers wanting ...


69

The longer you stay, the worse it will get (in terms of your being up to date on current technology). Go now.


66

From the hiring side here is how it works Development lead writes down the requirements for two jobs Project manager merges them into a single ad = "web designer who knows erlang" This is passed through layers of management to comment - comment consists of them adding the only language/technology they have heard of HR then 'fixes' this by changing the ...


62

Tell yourself "I don't need this job", and believe it. It's much easier to relax when you are not hanging all of your hopes on your interview performance. I always approach interviews focusing more on how the company can convince me to work for them, rather than the other way around (just be careful not to come across as arrogant and disinterested). If ...


59

You never have to stop programming, ever, as long as you are enjoying what you are doing. However, your organization might have a ceiling that you reach, and you simply can't go into a higher position or obtain a greater salary unless you leave the company or leave programming and move into a leadership role as a manager or technical lead.


59

Having just got a new job at nearly 50 in the UK I can say that it's possible and you're never too old. There are two approaches - both rely on your skills being relevant to the job. Stick with what you know and become a guru. This is risky as the number of jobs requiring "old" technologies are becoming fewer and further between as each year passes. ...


57

The killer feature of C++ is scope-bound resource management, SBRM (more commonly known as "RAII"). It is the only industrial programming language that is built around this concept. In C++, life times of all objects are exactly known, and (well-written) C++ programs guarantee that resources are acquired and released in fully deterministic manner. In ...


57

Code talks. Do you have a portfolio of projects that you've worked on in your spare time? You say that you have been a hobbyist for ten years. You must have something to show for that, no? (p.s. modesty helps too.)


53

Besides actually being good at what you do, you'll need to do two other things: Prove that you actually have teh skillz Your manager won't recognize this directly. Earn the respect of your co-workers by showing them that you know what you're doing. In an interview, provide skill references. Tutor/teach/instruct those around you/beginners on the team. ...


49

Some employers ask for gold when they really need silver; if they can get it on a tin salary, so much the better. It's wrong thinking, IMO. What they should really be looking for are steel tools to make gold, and that is what you have to convince them.


48

The thing about interpreted languages is companies that don't want to give their source code away don't use it in delivered software, so almost all the jobs you will see are web related. You might have better luck searching for specific frameworks like Django. If there's an open source project written in python you like, you might apply to a company that ...


42

When most people write a resume, they concentrate on their 'features'. This is ineffective marketing. People don't buy features, they buy benefits. I don't want a drill, I want a hole! So, craft your resume - and your attitude - to show how your skills and responsibilities led to a benefit for the client, user, and/or employer, as appropriate. Bad Example ...


40

There are a few markets for C and C++ (to my albeit limited understanding) Existing code. C and C++ have some of the largest existing codebases around. Code of this size can't simply be thrown out just because the "next hot new language" has come around. C bindings are pretty much the standard of inter-langauge interaction on most platforms, so being able ...


40

I don't think your plan is workable. Very few people can walk into a project cold and begin making a useful contribution within a week. Even if you are one of these rare people, your sponsors have no way of knowing that, so you'd be asking them to make a leap of faith, interrupting their own work schedule to orient you and set you up. I mean, even if the ...


37

I got my first programming job at age 37. So that's not too old to start, if you are bright, eager to learn, and willing to accept the salary of a junior programmer.


36

When I was working on finding my current position, I attended a workshop where I was the youngest person by at least a decade. A number of the other people in the workshop were 50+ and having a very hard time finding work. A few of the observations on why this is were: A lot of employers assume that since you're older you're also looking to score a couple ...


35

Anecdotally, if you look at any of the job boards such as Dice, you will find that the number of job postings for VB developers has remained relatively steady over time, while the number of job postings for C# developers has gradually increased. While this does not say anything about availability of programmers, it does suggest a gradual move in the ...


35

Programming requires a mindset that can be considered uncommon. The balance point on the supply-demand diagram is at a higher price, because employers need more programmers than what is available.


34

Context is everything. Silicon Valley isn't the only place with unstable employers; somebody who likes working for startups* is going to bounce around a lot between stable gigs. Look at the employers: staying no more than six months at, say, Apple, Bank of America, and Carnegie-Melon University is far more ominous than brief stays at Frank's ...


33

Assuming that this was for a permanent position it would raise a warning in my mind. Basically I don't want to be training this person's replacement in a year's time. However, I would look at the circumstances for each move. Were any redundancies? Was the move due to the relocation of a spouse? etc. If there were legitimate reasons for most of the moves ...


32

Here's a reason nobody has covered yet: Government department wants to hire a specific person for an open position. Due to public service hiring rules, they can't do that. They need to have a competition and look at all applicable candidates. But they already have who they want on contract, and getting the person into that position is the desired outcome. ...


31

It's not just about interviews, it's about global social skills. Making a good interviews is easy as long as you are competent and can show it. The first part, you are. The second one can be trained like anything else. You can make you own bootcamp to drastically improve your social skills : 1 - Plan objectives for a week, a month, a year (and don't try ...



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