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26

I've started blogging about things I've learned. Just a simple free blog, I keep it private, if it's worth sharing I'll spend some time to transform it into a post that's intelligible enough someone else can read it and walk away with something. You can tag ideas and search by grouping later too. Also helpful for creating an online identity for employment ...


23

I'm currently using OneNote from Microsoft to organize and keep record of most of my data, activities and notes. I'm using its online storage to have it automatically shared between my home desktop, personal notebook and office notebook. Unfortunately it has some limits (for example, no integration with eBooks) but it is the most comprehensive and powerful ...


19

I've been using TiddlyWiki for a few months now. It's a editable wiki page all contained within a single html file. The idea is that you make notes (called tiddlers) and edit content via the html/js interface. When you hit save (or the autosave kicks in) it overwrites itself to include all your updates. It doesn't require a web host or anything complex, ...


15

Stackoverflow/StackExchange I've gotten in the habit, if its something I don't know, or something someone else might need to know - I'll ask it as a question. that way, if I want to find it later I can reference back in my list and easily find the answer. Plus its reliably good insight half of the time, so I am not trying to implement a method I find out ...


13

One of the most commonly used tools for this is usually a wiki. There are many open-source wiki tools out there (MediaWiki, TikiWiki, DokuWiki to name a few), many times wiki comes bundled with other tools that support software development (Jira, Trac, Mingle, FogBugz...).


13

You need to know: How to Think. If you can't think, go work in some other profession. Know where to look. You don't have to know everything about something, you have to know enough to be useful, and enough to THINK "hey there needs to be a way to do X" and then go look it up. Know your limits. This means your abilities, your lack of knowledge, the fact ...


12

Based on the content of the algorithm you can identify what data structures/types/constructs are used. Then, you try to understand the (possible) weak points of those and try to come up with an execution plan that will make it run in those cases. For example, the algorithm takes a string and an integer as input and does some sorting of the characters of the ...


11

I worked for a fast-growing startup company that went from under 100 to 500+ people in two and a half years, where the issue of knowledge sharing quickly became a problem. The company built a strategy that worked reasonably well, and included three key components: Documentation Standardization Internal Training Each team was responsible for releasing ...


8

The standard bell curve distribution holds for so many disciplines, including programming. The majority of people in IT-related fields are "intermediate:" coders banging out apps in a daily grind to make a living, most of whom didn't go to grad school. Likewise, in health care, the majority of workers are not doctors, but nurses, technicians, and orderlies. ...


6

Trac wiki, svn, bug tracker all integrated in one place. cost: £40 per annum all set up, hosted and managed for me by http://hosted-projects.com/ I love it With a mixture of 'wiki + tickets' you can store just about anything. I have wiki pages for things like: JobReports (write notes as I code) How To's... (if i find myself repeating the same thing, ...


6

Programmer Competency Matrix is a good enough checklist, and it's an easy, informative read, from a single source. Norvig's classic blog on "Learning to Program in 21-Days" is also a good read.


5

Freemind It does a great job of storing lots of ideas in a semantic hierarchical manner. Plus, any node can also be a link to a website. Learning how to completely manipulate the Mind Map using only keys is a must (including, adding meaningful color coding skills). I use this in conjunction with Dropbox to make it the mind maps available on all my ...


5

I use GMail with some Filter/Tag automatic-organisation-fu. Makes searches really easier too.


5

Wikis are really fantastic tools with a very low barrier to entry for people adding information.


5

How about something like Sphinx? You write your documentation in reStructuredText (the syntax is similar to Markdown, which Stack Overflow uses) into plain text files (=easy to version control) and Sphinx spits out HTML pages. The two most prominent Sphinx users (that I know of) are the Python language and TortoiseHG (see the links for the Sphinx ...


5

Well, you can try to implement a Wiki. Mediawiki has all the missing features you are talking of (search functions, versioning history, links, categorization). You will have to make sure you know exactly which version of the documentation belongs to which version of the software, but that can be done by convention of including a version reference or a ...


5

Spend the two days working with the new graphic library. Then work with one or at most two of the senior team members to port their algorithms to the new graphic library. After two weeks present a formal seminar of what you have learned from the porting effort to the entire team. Make a wiki. Here is the rationale: You need at least two days to figure out ...


5

Sounds like a job for Prolog If you decide to implement this system using Prolog, then this article will help you with choosing an appropriate data store. It dates back to 2002 but Prolog has been around a lot longer than that so the information should still be useful.


4

I use Google Docs. It's accessible from any computer with an Internet connection, and it's free so I don't have to pay any fees, I can attach plain text, archived source code and binaries, etc. Documents can be easily organized and search functionality is very fast.


4

This isn't going to happen automagically. You've recongnized the problem; now you need to take the steps to find a solution (This question will get closed if you just want a list of possible apps.). If the project is really small then it's not even in company's VCS. This is the first problem. No such thing as being too small for source control. Get ...


3

I tend to do a lot of list operations and recursion. Almost treating javascript as if it was lisp. somthing like this function getNegative (elements){ return elements.filter(function (el){ return el< 0; }); } very clean and easy to understand


3

jQuery jQuery makes such extensive use of closures and wrapping objects that it pretty much turns JavaScript into a completely different language. Example: $('ul.level-2').children().css('background-color', 'red'); From http://api.jquery.com/children/ jQuery is interesting in that often it's completely ambiguous whether you have a single element or a ...


3

Three tools will solve your problem: Evernote, Google Code hosting and SugarSync(or dropbox, etc). All these services are cloud based so they are accessible everywhere. The detailed solution is: Put ebooks and podcasts in a synchronized folder under SugarSync. Put your code snippets under google code, that the best way to store code. For web articles, blog ...


3

pmWiki -- a flat-file, PHP (!!!) wiki from "the pumpking for the Rakudo Perl 6 compiler." Okay, so he's no longer the prime, active maintainer, but he's got chops! And the work he put into pmWiki made it a flexible, extensible, secure multi-user simultaneously-editable CMS. I use pmwiki for a personal site, a commercial-oriented-site and as a departmental ...


3

I'd like to comment on this because I think that even though this question has probably been asked a lot in these forums, it doesn't matter, you get different perspectives every time it's asked. With that, here's my experience and I guess "wisdom or insite" into our profession. Some of this will overlap with what others have already stated but I'm listing ...


3

I've found wikis to be the best tool for this kind of thing by far. Of course you need one with good full text search, possibly a WYSIWYG editor, and users need to learn how to use it well (mainly by choosing search patterns likely to be unique for the specific problem). But the big advantage is that it's easy to add and edit entries, and include all ...


3

I use nvALT. I store my notes as text files on a Dropbox account, so I can get at them from any computer or device. I keep a note for each project with all the pertinent details. I also have an index page which is a list of links to these individual project notes. nvALT supports wiki-style linking between notes. Though nvALT's search engine is good enough ...


2

I am currently using a combination of Evernote and Google Bookmarks. Evernote has a good web application, good desktop clients and good mobile clients. Additionally, I can get by with the free version, as long as I am just using text plus occasional documents and photos and the paid version, while not cheap, is quite reasonable for what you get. I use Google ...


2

We use Assembla at work to create a company knowledge base (we also use it for collaborating with customers). It has a wiki as well as file uploading tools, so most of the things you mention can be added or linked to. It's not free (except for open source projects) but it's pretty reasonably priced.



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