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This question is indeed too broad to be answered by a single answer on any single StackExchange site. You might want to visit the Information Security site to read about the practical techniques that you will want to adopt for your software. Of course, you can probably find similar techniques discussed on this site or at StackOverflow, written from a ...


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Short answer: Absolutely no guarantees can be made about a program that crashes (or in fact one that DOESN'T crash). If an application crashes, the entire program's data (and any other writable memory areas, files, databases, etc that this program MAY have touched) areas must be treated as "probably not correct". Long answer: Since there is absolutely no ...


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Though */bin seems to suggest by name that the contents therein are BINaries, the BSD hier man-page does not seem to suggest it. It only seems to suggest that the contents be executable. In particular: /bin/ user utilities fundamental to both single-user and multi-user environ- ments /usr/ contains the majority of user ...


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The solution is a remote procedure call. The callee must run in its own process space. How exactly you achieve that is a fairly minor detail. I'd strongly suggest not inventing the wheel yourself. Not that you'd need this after you've "formally proven its correctness". Correct code doesn't cause segfaults.


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Note that at least in the case of SCSI, the correct term is Host Bus Adapter. And that's exactly what it does: SCSI devices are pretty intelligent and independent, so the SCSI HBA does actually not "control" the devices in the same sense that, say, a floppy disk controller (if you still remember floppies ;-) ) or a USB Host Controller does. A SCSI HBA ...


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A host adapter can, well, host attached devices. A host adapter knows how to detect, power on, hand-shake, initialize, and make available a simpler device using a pluggable interface such as SCSI, SATA, or USB. Host adapters usually know how to handle multiple attached devices, and route information between them and the rest of the computer. The non-host ...


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A file handle is an abstraction, even for a regular text file. When the user performs a read system call, a lot happens inside the kernel. To the user, it looks like you're reading consecutive bytes from a disk, but those bytes might be on separate disks on separate computers, or in various levels of memory cache. The kernel has to find the best place to ...


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The user mode program always uses system calls to communicate with the hardware. The device file exists solely so that the program can use well-known, simple, standard system calls to get the job done rather than complicated device-specific ones. Basically, reading and writing a device file involves exactly the same system calls open(), read(), write()` ...



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