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The real answer is Money. There's not enough perceived benefit of a high level language OS to justify spending the resources to build one and then push it into the mainstream. There's massive cost involved in building a new driver for each piece of hardware it needs to support, for example. There are various OSes written in high level languages, with the ...


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A big thing to consider is that once a language is "settled" a lot of it comes set in stone. A lot of time and resources are spent making software in that language. And in a lot of cases, once software is done, it's done and only small maintenance remains to be done. You can't sell: "hey you need to change all the software you made because we introduced ...


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Money. Cheaper developers, faster development speeds, and less bugs equal more money. Portability. Many high level languages allow you to target different platforms out of the box. Low level languages like C require significant efforts run on multiple platforms. Training. You can train a developer in Python in a day, while something like C++ takes ...


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"Besides the fact that a higher level language is easier to code in and therefore less error prone" I really think this is a good enough reason all by itself. If you have no compelling reason to work in a low level of abstraction (such as performance, knowledge in the team, etc), then there is no reason to do it. If all you want is a coffee, then you want ...


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Higher lever languages are by definition easier to learn, they take away a lot of the complexities of lower level programming such as memory management. Besides that since the explosion of hardware power it is much cheaper to get a faster processor or more RAM into a machine that paying the developer hours that'd come with a more complex programming language....



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