Hot answers tagged

75

I've been using MacOS X for about half a year on my dev machine and I definitely wound not recommend it to developer, other than iPhone/OSX developers (they don't have a choice, do they?). I've replaced OSX with Ubuntu. Apparently I'm not the only one switching from OSX back to Linux. All the tools you take for granted in Linux are either non-existent or ...


69

Disclaimer for comments: I use what I've determined to be best for me. Those reasons are what I've listed here. Finding the "greatest fit for programmers" in all situations is impossible, and I don't think anyone bases their choice on thinking they've found it. It's a Unix-based OS with a great user interface installed on great hardware. Hardware that ...


59

Developers just need to provide a package for a distribution. Each distribution then has a way to install this package. This way can be in a terminal (apt-get) or via a graphical interface, e.g. Ubuntu Software Center. The beauty is that developers just have to care about building a proper package; the distribution makers take care of the rest, and each ...


40

Because they don't need to. Linux distributions usually have working package management systems, unlike Windows, where every single application has to re-implement installation and updating over and over and over and over again.


36

There is a good practice where you are "liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send". In other words, if there is a chance (however small it will be) that someone will give you a cr line ending (and expect it to work correctly) , you'll need to support it. TBH, I can't see how adding CR support would take all that long. When you see a cr ...


35

For me the main benefit over Linux is that it all just works together, especially on a laptop. Video, wireless, suspend/resume without having to find and configure the right drivers, determine what chipset you've got etc. All that might be doable with Linux, but it's a hassle when you just want to get some work done.


22

Developers or not, experienced or not, intelligent or not most people will favor aesthetic beauty over substance. Macs are good but completely undeserving of the kind of support they have. It's clear that there are no compelling reasons to use a Mac over a PC running Linux or Windows but people try extremely hard to find some to justify buying one. I don't ...


21

No. CR is not obsolete (defined as "no longer produced or used"). You yourself have provided evidence of that. It is perhaps uncommon, but not obsolete. As for "is it safe to exclude support" for CR? As you say, it's not a matter of losing sales, and you can't support every weird character combination and file format in the world, and only you know your ...


20

Most closed-source, non free-as-in-beer software for Linux does come with installation wizards. So does some closed-source, free-as-in-beer software, at least until most major distributions pick it up. For open source software, package managers are a clearly superior solution. So what about the early stages before open source software gets picked up by ...


19

Mac has all Unix features with awesome UI.


18

About laziness: you have to balance: effort in changing code so that CR is safely handled (and then forget about it). effort in explaining to users why the files they were happy with for decades suddenly crash your app, in finding workarounds that they can use without compromising your sales and in asking for arguments and anwsering to comments right here. ...


15

I have just made one. Here is a link to it. This is currently developed for personal (my) use. So you may feel bad with some lack of implementation. Give me a feedback (or feature requests) then. I'll add some keybinds or commands if I have enough time.


14

I was an OS X early adopter and a long-time Mac supporter, but I've come to the conclusion that they still don't make good dev machines, especially not in an enterprise environment. I'd used them at school and had one on my second desk at work for awhile (rarely used, 95% of my time was on a Unix terminal, but I always liked it when I had the opportunity to ...


14

No, Silverlight is the only Microsoft option from .Net on OS X. Mono does not "lag" as much as you think; it supports .Net 4.0 and C# 4, for example. However, the UI toolkits (WinForms and WPF) are not well supported on OS X. Mono doesn't support WPF at all. Neither could Microsoft without rewriting the entire rendering engine. That's probably OK, though. If ...


14

Linux distributions (as well, I think, as BSD-flavoured Unices) have a user-friendly interface to program installation, via so-called package managers (or ports management in the BSD case): pacman for Arch, dpkg for Debian/Ubuntu, and so on. These package manager provide a way to install programs by means of uniform configuration files. Once the program you ...


13

is there any semi-authoritative answer to why Microsoft just doesn't support .NET on the Mac itself? The best answer is probably that you don't "just support" .NET on the Mac. You spend hundreds of millions of dollars and several years porting .NET to the Mac. While some things are fully managed and would not require porting, most things are ...


13

There are three main reason I'm on Mac (specifically Macbook Pro) now for my software dev needs: Great hardware. It feels great to work on, the battery life is awesome, and the screen is just beautiful. Oh, and the trackpad is pretty nice too. Unix. It's based on Unix, and it's great for Ruby development. I have my terminal too. Runs Windows great too. I ...


11

Less headaches when it comes to interpreted languages. Python, perl, ruby, and prolog come pre-installed (as they do on most *NIX systems). Much better UI than many Linux systems, imho. Headaches do occur when trying to build system-specific C programs (anyone tried building their own thread scheduler in C, in OS X? Not fun). On Windows, python, perl, and ...


11

I've often asked myself, and others this question, and I'd like to address a point I often see brought up before I get to why Linux sees fewer installers: Linux distributions provide package managers. However, I wouldn't say that a Linux distribution's package manager is a replacement for an installer for, in part, the following reasons: These package ...


10

I'd attempt to enlist the basic clues over browsers which provide the visual differences, based on my own experience (and efforts) in that direction: The fonts. The browser uses fonts (via the font-family css property) to display text on the page. Most of these fonts are coming from the operating system, so here is a short list of what can go wrong with ...


9

If you own 100% of the code in your application, (like in the iRail example you linked to) then you can dual-license the code: one for AppStore and one for everybody else. If you don't own 100% of the (i.e. you make use of GPL third-party libraries) then you also need to get permission of those copyright-holders, and you need to get a new license from them ...


9

Your home directory is a great place to store your code on a Mac/Ubuntu (Linux based system). I would still create sub directories under it as appropriate. I usually organize by project, with a few extra directories for whatever, e.g. /home/myname/project_pear /home/myname/project_pear/upgrade/ /home/myname/random_java_code ...


9

Xamarin doesn't "target" Windows, because there is no point - whatever you write in C#, is ready to run on Windows in and of itself. That's why they're only selling licences for Xamarin.Android, Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Mac. But what would a Xamarin.Windows abstraction layer be supposed to do? That would be a textbook snake oil product :) "Native Windows ...


8

Is it safe to exclude support for the statistically insignificant percentage of users who decide (for whatever reason) to the old Mac OS style line-endings? Maybe not too many users will detect it, but there's an elephant in the room: Windows line endings (CRLF). If you support those (I generally do, even though I only use Windows for games), it should ...


8

To large extends it's both. The Linux distribution model is closer to AppStore/Play Store then traditional Windows/Mac OS X one - and even those platform are moving there from what I've heard. The convention is that it's simpler. Most arguments for the AppStore/Play Store applies to Linux as well: Automatic updates. Having 20 programs update separately on ...


7

Application stores, which force the user to go through them (as this happens on iPhone), dramatically change the business scene for software vendors. With "old-style" approach the user needed to go to the search engine to find an application he needs or to rely on friends' suggestions or magazine articles. This made it possible for developers to create a ...


7

The fact is that it doesn't really matter. If you really want to improve your productivity as a programmer, stop thinking about how cool is it to have the windows making all those fancy stuff and learn to use command-line tools, a great scripting language and a great editor. You will see your productivity increase regardless of the OS you choose. When you ...


7

When you get into time-limited trials and sending clients "unlock codes", those are really digital licensing and copy protection. There are lots of options for that, and there's no one "Best way". It sounds like your programmer hasn't done this kind of thing before, and it's the sort of thing you can spend a lot of time and money on, and still get wrong (as ...



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