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2

I think it's about software fit to its environment and to developer's expectations. What do I mean by environment: Software that doesn't evolve works with file formats and protocols that gradually come out of fashion. Operating system may be replaced making parts of the codebase seem odd at least even if they somehow still function. Old programs don't know ...


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Some large software are rotting quite slowly, because a significant part of them becomes redesigned/reimplemented/refactored from time to time. Take for example the GCC compiler. It is 28 years old, has more than 13 millions lines of source code (and measuring its size is challenging; depending on the tools you are using you could get a size of 20MLOC), and ...


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The rule-of-thumb about not modifying frameworks unless you intend to submit the modification back is mostly a pragmatic one: every time you do this you commit to re-applying the modification every time you update the framework to a new version. If you forget to re-apply the modification after an update, or if the framework changes the code in question so ...



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