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Consistency has a high priority. Obviously everyone in their right mind would prefer an elegant DRY solution everywhere instead of copy-pasted boilerplate everywhere, but would you really prefer two different approaches in the same codebase to having one consistently applied? What if someone invents an even smarter solution and also applies it ...


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You should just keep doing your code the way you think is right, with comments and such and making a copy of you version of the code (in case he changes your code). Do not fight, don't get mad, just smile when you see his poor decisions. Only complain as a user, if it is working don't complain. Don't give up either, it is important to get used to people ...


2

Assuming you decide to abandon the project: Fork the code and refactor it, using it as a 'before/after' portfolio item Since the goal was (mainly or partly) to learn programming and since learning something takes 2-4x as long as doing something you know already, that work is not really wasted. 'Sunk cost attachment' (the investment you've already made in ...


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To add additional points to all the great answers: How much more effort will it take to finish the project? Note that finishing the "last 10%" takes much much longer than people expect. That includes play testing/tuning, usability fixing, coping with a variety of target platforms, releasing, ... If it's an iOS game, then there's code signing and getting ...


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tl;dr you should arguably abandon the project. Without knowing any more about this then you've told us, I'd speculate that the friction you're experiencing is experience-related. Even though you're not a programmer by profession as an IT pro you've probably learned the hard way about doing things right the first time, your reference to your future self ...


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I like all of the answers so far. Taking one of the points from enderland's answer: Are there benefits to working with someone on a voluntary basis when it's frustrating? I'd like to take this time to plug for the code review stack exchange. It's a wonderful place where you can get your code critiqued by professionals. And honestly, a lot of the ...


2

It sounds pretty hopeless. I would probably give up and move on if I felt about it as you do; there definitely comes a time to walk away and you may be there. If you're not ready to walk away yet, you need to find a way to come to better agreement about your process. It sounds like you have coding standards, but not agreed-upon standards. Next time you ...


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Here are some ideas even if some of them are mutually exclusive. Separate source responsibilities. If you work on Module A and him on Module B you can compete with your different styles. Is he releasing working features often? Does he reach a point where he needs to rewrite his code from scratch? Refactor the code from your modules and do not touch him's, ...


25

Shipped, imperfect code is better than perfect code on the whiteboard that never gets shipped. That being said... Those of you with more experience, or that have been in similar situations. What did you do? What would you recommend I do? I would consider the following. What is the purpose of this project? Fun? Money? To learn? Are you actually ...


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Ok, here is an answer you will probably not like. Do not 'correct' the code unless it fails to implement the feature. Here's my reasoning. You are presumably trying to make money. To make money you have to ship completed features quickly. No one is going to pay you more for a 'well coded' computer game. Most companies have the same problem. Refactor ...


54

This may be a cultural thing. In some cultures, admitting that you made a mistake is unheard of, and asking someone to admit to making a mistake is about the rudest thing you can do. If it is that situation, run away. In my experience with very smart people, if you tell them that something they are doing is less than perfect, they will either (1) give you ...


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Possibly the easiest way is to bring someone else into the project - either you're wrong and his codebase is just too clever for you, or you're right and its too clever for everyone. You'll soon find out, and will get backup if it does turn out to be rubbish, convoluted, junior-programmer level code. On the other hand, a working product is worth any number ...


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After talking to a professor at my university, and using the information provided by Ilyas Mohamed and Boris Eetgerink (I will +rep as soon as I recieve 15 rep myself), this is what I have concluded: Law 3 specifies that the growth of the system will follow the normal distribution curve. This means that the growth will be slower in the beginning and end of ...



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