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1

Your problem addresses the pidgeonhole principle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigeonhole_principle). It simply sais that if you got N items and you want to put them into M containers, where N is greater than M, then at least one container has to hold at least ceil(N/M) (Where ceil(x) is the smallest integer greater than or equal to x) items. You can solve ...


3

From the definition, "off points" can be inside or outside the domain, both cases match that definition. But the text says "how should you choose test points" (which means - to get a good test coverage with as few cases as possible). So when you have chosen an "on point" which is inside the domain in case of a closed boundary, it makes just more sense to ...


3

They are giving rules about how to chose test points. you have to have in test points and out one (or you'll have tested only one side of it). you have to have on test points (to be sure to test the limit) and off one. For closed borders, the on test points are in, thus there must be an off one which is out. For open borders, the on test points are ...


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For closed domain, both OFF and ON points are outside domain, while for open domain, the OFF point is in inside the domain. I just do not get why is that. This is incorrect. For both open and closed domain, one point is inside and one point is outside the domain. The difference is which point is inside (and which outside). To test a domain boundary, ...


3

Computers are not Turing Machines. They are Deterministic Finite State Machines. Turing Machines have infinite memory, computers have finite memory. Turing Machines have arbitrarily many (though finite) states, computers can't have arbitrarily many states, the number of different states that a computer can be in is bounded by its memory (a computer with ...


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Take your favorite program using some PRNG. Then imagine what would happen if the period of the PRNG becomes very small (e.g. 100). Of course it depends upon the program, but if you use the weak PRNG for encryption, an attacker could easily notice the periodicity, and eventually be able to decrypt secret messages. If you use the weak PRNG for Monte Carlo ...


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This depends on what "mathematically well defined" means. All of your functions are well defined in the sense of having a unique definition. However, multiplication and division are problematic, since they are not guaranteeing (b * n) * m == b * (n * m) nor (b * n) / m == b * (n / m) where b is a bearing and n is a numeric value, and that is what you ...



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