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..., except that a modern C compiler would turn your f2() into this: void f2(void) { int u = 9; // RL A } And if f1() was declared static, the compiler would not even emit it to the output file. All of that is assuming that your comment, // RL A stands for some actual code that uses u. If it's really just a comment, then the compiler would turn ...


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The author sounds as if he doesn't understand what he is talking about - though the problem may be in translation rather than in the author's thinking. Or perhaps he is over-simplifying for the purposes of exposition, confusing people who (like you) actually think about what they are reading. Any description of what happens in hardware terms when C code is ...


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I found out some of the factors that may contribute to the effect. 1) At least in tiny-cnn, some of the buffers are allocated not once but once per worker thread. On a machine with 8 CPU threads, this can increase the memory usage a lot. In debug mode using MS VC++ 2015 the following two lines in the code base allocate a big chunk, both related to worker ...


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Your calculation for the amount of memory used appears to be related to the number of neurons in the network and storing a double for each, but that isn't the only storage that is required -- each neuron will also contain a number of weights, each of which is likely to need at least a float. This is the last column in your output, and (at least if I ...



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