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60

I guess if there's any one "incident" then it was the so-called "Halloween Documents", which were a series of memoranda that were leaked by a Microsoft employee to Eric S. Raymond in the late 90's, detailing Microsoft's desire to "disrupt the progress of open source software." It is worth mentioning a fact that highlights the aforementioned statement: that ...


49

As Dean pointed out, for historical reasons. However, I think Microsoft has been progressively heading the right way, take for example this: Microsoft signs the Joomla! Contributor Agreement http://www.microsoft.com/web/joomla/ Keep in mind that Microsoft, above all, is a business, and they will always look for profit in some form of another, however, I ...


37

How about a 100% discount? If you are making software you intend to sell, you qualify for BizSpark, which gives all your developers MSDN subscriptions. If you intend instead to offer your services, you don't qualify for BizSpark, but you still don't need to buy separate licenses for dev, staging etc. You can get an MSDN subscription, which covers one ...


33

I'll posit that it's because most of the "big websites" started out small. Google, youtube, facebook, et al. were all at one time single-server sites that someone built as a hobby. They used LAMP-like stacks because: 1) they're cheap and the devs were poor and often 2) because they were at a university and university environments tend to favor OSS. After ...


28

I have used Microsoft support through the 'free' incidents included with an MSDN subscription and have always had a great experience with it. From uploading large crash-dumps and being told the specific issue to one time being put in contact with one of the developers of the particular piece of code that was causing an issue. So, yeah, I would say they ...


28

We have always called it "Auto Code Completion" or just "Code Completion". I have heard the term "code hinting" used as well.


26

I am an active open source developer with commit access to several projects. I don't hate Microsoft. There are some things that I dislike about our industry as a whole, of which Microsoft is a part: Patent litigation, I hate it when software is designed in court. I hate the concept of math I can't use. I can't stand companies that purchase hordes of ...


22

This is kind of a "have you stopped beating your wife?" question. While there are Microsoft products that cost thousands of dollars, there are plenty more (from Microsoft) that are free, always, to everyone (eg Express) and ways (legitimate, real, ways) to get the expensive products for free. See Are there deals (free or low cost) to license Visual Studio ...


21

I worked as an SDET at Microsoft for 6 years in DevDiv. Is career development in any way hurt by this position? No, however, like career development anywhere: you are in charge of your own success. The problem many people in the SDET role face is that it's too easy to just do manual testing. This slowly atrophies your technical skills and poisons your ...


21

Why is Microsoft® Internet Explorer® incompatible with other browsers and published standards? To add features that other browsers don't have When programmers write web pages that use IE-only features, the code will not work on other browsers. This encourages end-users to view those sites in IE (and thus more people use IE, and since it only runs ...


20

Cost That's what I'm placing my money on. Facebook has 60k servers, what's the license cost on that vs. Linux? Look at the "open stack" as we can call it: Apache – Free PHP - Free MySQL - Free Linux - Free Contrast to the MS stack: IIS - $$$ Visual Studio - $$$ (but it's great) OS - $$$ SQL Server - $$$


19

If you have a Delphi background, you will be disappointed in WinForms. You will try to do things that were easy in the VCL, only to find that they're painfully difficult, or even impossible. WPF will be much less confining. For example, here are just a few of the WinForms limitations we've run into: WinForms has nothing that compares to TAction, so if ...


19

I don't think Bill Gates made a lot of money off of the Alttair (did anyone?). A bigger break was buying a DOS from someone else, fixing it up and selling licenses to IBM for their PC. IBM along with a lot of other makers of PC's had few choices of operating systems so they stuck with MS-DOS. This did include BASIC, which was a big benefit at the time ...


18

Microsoft had something of an anti-competitive reputation before open source was ever an issue. One example is one of the Office apps (Word, I think) which was claimed to include during startup an allocation of an unrealistically huge amount of memory which was then immediately freed without ever being used for anything. When asked to allocate a large block ...


18

Well some time ago (like 5-6 years AFAIR) they tried to make linux illegal by throwing money at SCO company lawsuit. They were sending legal threats and trying to sue linux users, pretending to own it. It took like 2 years, before they finally acknowledge they were unable to point any "stolen" code, so they switch to a nice thing called software patents and ...


18

You might find this Wikipedia article to be interesting and informative. Microsoft started development on the .NET Framework in the late 1990s originally under the name of Next Generation Windows Services (NGWS). By late 2000 the first beta versions of .NET 1.0 were released. An old press release for the .NET family alludes to its previous title of ...


18

Also are there any pros and cons of using any of them? Registry: + Relatively standard in the Windows environment. + Generally good support from installers, etc. - Platform specific API, if you ever want to port your application. - Not particularly human readable. INI Files: + Simple format. + Portable. + Human readable. - May be difficult to ...


18

To address your points: it seems like a more structured environment, I guess specifically because it's not community-driven. Does that make for a more linear learning experience? That depends on whether you want to spend some money on formal tuition. If you go through some certification courses, it probably does. If you're following books or ...


17

I don't think cost is the primary reason, but sites like Google need a high level of control over what runs on their servers. They don't use a default installation of Ubuntu on their servers. Managing thousands of servers means that an awful lot of administration tasks must be automated. Command line oriented, modular open source operating systems like Linux ...


17

Yes, there is support available. My husband used to work as a support technician for Microsoft about 10 years ago. He was trained to work with people who don't have a high level of technical knowledge, and supported average end-users without any special "paid support" options. You can start with http://support.microsoft.com/ to figure out what is ...


16

Transcender's Joshua Hester reported (about the beta version of this test): 71-515 (TS: Web Applications Development with .NET Framework 4): A warning for old-school Web developers — this is not your father’s ASP anymore, so forget what you learned from the 70-562 (TS: 3.5, ASP.NET Application Development). The 4.0 exam focuses heavily on ASP.NET MVC 2, ...


15

Unfortunately, those are both myths. SDEs and SDETs get the same starting salary, so it would be silly to have a lower bar for one of the positions. You'll have to code at the whiteboard in both interviews and show that you can deconstruct complex problems. Depending on the group, the SDE loop may have more emphasis on algorithms, and on the SDET side, ...


15

However, do big vendors (e.g. Microsoft) really offer "support" of any kind? Depending on what you call support, but I argue yes, absolutely. Their evangelists are phenomenal. Two weeks ago one of the MS staff set up a meeting with my team for free to go over the problems we have and next steps. She also offered to come back in 6 months to ...


15

Goodwill Training ease for their products (tutorials don't fail because of misplaced file) Net traffic analysis


15

I'd go with INI files, they are the more human friendly option: [window] width = 600 height = 350 position.x = 400 position.y = 200 [paths] path1 = "/some/random/path/" path2 = "/some/other/random/path/" [user] name = "Yannis" preference = "INI" XML might be a good option, but it can't beat INIs' simplicity and elegance: ...


14

There is a VERY long, yet very informative, post by Joel Spolsky on his blog that explains some of this... Basically it amounts to the notion that large corporations with tons of money will pay that hefty fee. The mid sized and smaller companies will go for something cheaper, and the tiny shops will use the free version (or the expensive version acquired ...


14

They have released a UI framework that supports ribbons -- it's just supported in MFC instead of .NET. There's probably room for quite a bit of debate as to why they did things that way, but it is what they did anyway. It looks like Metro-style apps will be supported much more universally -- not only C++, but also C#, VB, and Javascript are supported, if ...


14

I've conducted on-campus interviews when I was employed by Microsoft. While I'm guessing your question as phrased is too narrow to be of general interest, I've experienced a similar screening process at several companies used for both campus screening and phone interviews, so I'll take the liberty of assuming my answer to be of broader use than just what ...


13

Culture Great hackers demand control. Great hackers share stuff. All the cool toys come from great hackers, and they end up sharing and improving on each other. Think of all the cool shiny stuff that's been coming out recently: Python, Ruby, Rails, Django, Flask, Node.js, etc. All of them come from people who use a Unix system (Linux or Mac). Unix ...



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