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0

you can use Swing+MVC+Hibernate check this tutorial how to configure hibernate with swing in netneans https://netbeans.org/kb/docs/java/hibernate-java-se.html


2

Unless you come up with some specific code that changes my mind, I'm going to say that MVCS is just a slight variation on MVC that makes it clearer that the Business Domain lives in the Model, and is technically separate from the data Store. MVC just includes S (the data store) as part of the Model, but the business domain always lives there.


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Routers are part of the controller layer. The router processing mechanism is a replacement of the old school Front Controller pattern (the big switch in the index.php). In a modern framework a router defines a direct connection between a "kind" of possible requests and its processor. By contrast, a controller gets just identifying information, and parses ...


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Yes and no and it depends. MVC is one of the terms which once had a very specific meaning, but then have grown in use to become a much broader and less specific term. The original use of MVC was specifically as a oo design pattern used when coding desktop GUIs in Smalltalk. The pattern was specifically concerned about separating the data displayed in a form ...


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The Timeless Way of Building, which introduced the idea of Patterns was written in 1979, and it took another decade until programmers started to take Christopher Alexander's ideas and apply it to software (Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software was released in 1994). The original MVC paper(s) were written starting in 1978, before the ...


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I solved this when I started using service providers with a dependency injection container to implement a module system. Treating modules as service providers for the application is what worked best, whether they are providing new services or providing to data to existing services, like routes. The admin panel has itself become a module that simply ...


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As the previous answer states, separation of concerns is a good idea. In your context, this basically means grouping related code into separate controllers, rather than grouping based on the design pattern that they are all controller operations. This means that if your application needs to be refactored or parts reused in some way, that you won't have to go ...


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In general I think it is good to keep the separation of concerns in mind. Don't hesitate to create new views and new controllers. If you correctly define the responsibility of each controller, in the end your code is much easier to maintain. In your specific case, if you haven't already, have a look at directives in AngularJS. They are pretty well explained ...


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There exist bindings you can use to bind list items with data. This does exactly what I need. http://www.vogella.com/tutorials/EclipseDataBinding/article.html#tutorial_observablemaplabelprovider


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Read this it may help you Spring's Web MVC framework is designed around a DispatcherServlet that dispatches requests to handlers, with configurable handler mappings, view resolution, locale and theme resolution as well as support for upload files. The default handler is a very simple Controller interface, just offering a ModelAndView ...


0

There are good answers here. I post this as a partial answer; it would perhaps be better as a comment. However sticking the same comment on numerous posts is not good. One cannot claim YAGNI is a reason for not creating an API. The API is a natural and logical testing endpoint. Thus right from day 0, there are two applications that use the API: the UI and ...


2

When I started my career in 2006 this type of architecture was all the rage in the .NET world. I worked on 3 separate projects conceived in the mid 2000s with a web service between the business logic layer and the web frontend. Of course these days the web services were SOAP but it is still the same architecture. The supposed benefits were the ability to ...


3

Short Version: Your controller effectively an API no matter what; though ASP.NET may be obscuring that. Longer Version: Think about a basic MVC Web App that provides information about beer and optionally sells you one. What do the routes look like? /sign_in /sign_out /beer /beer/{beer_name} /order /order/{order_number} In a normal web-app, there are ...



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