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14

I feel that you're doing it wrong. You're heading towards unmaintainable spaghetti environment. Java projects tend to grow to tens or hunderds of dependencies. You start from Guava, JodaTime, SLF4J some commons and it grows... and it's OK. Just don't try to maintain it manually. Maven/Gradle is a must! Never ever commit eclipse workspace files. It just not ...


7

If you work for a company that pays for a commercial IDE, then yes, they may well insist that you use it and possibly with good reason. You say all your colleagues have moved to PHPStorm as well - it can be useful sometimes to use the same tools as your colleges, since you can then share experiences, tips and techniques, as well as e.g. standard templates ...


6

Although NetBeans has a nice GUI editor, I would recommend that you start by learning Swing, with the Java tutorials. Swing is the GUI framework often (but not exclusively) used for Java applications, and it's also the framework supported by the NetBeans GUI editor. Once you understand Swing, you can dive into learning the tools provided by NetBeans.


6

The main alternative to NetBeans would be Eclipse, which also has a huge range of plugins for other languages and additional features (source control, unit-testing, refactoring, project management, you name it). If you are looking at the wider world, i.e. not just for Java, then you might want to have a look at MonoDevelop, which has come along very nicely ...


5

Maybe you could try a Maven multi-module project. This way you have no IDE related stuff on any of your branches. Each developer picks up the code, and the IDE resolves whats in the pom.xml and builds the environment accordingly. Both Netbeans and Eclipse have good maven plugins. Multi-module projects allow you to have an Android module which can be built ...


5

Eclipse was originally created as a platform for IDEs. There are many IDEs based on Eclipse and each of them is targeted to a particular niche. The original Eclipse download contained the base platform plus JDT (Java Development Tools) and that misled many people to think Eclipse was only a Java IDE. With relation to "...a new variant that resembles too ...


5

If you need different settings for C and python, you can have them: autocmd FileType python setlocal expandtab autocmd FileType c setlocal noexpandtab


4

You did not post any details but I'm going to suppose that: you have one project that is your calculator the part that computes results following GUI events is mixed with the GUI itself Next part I'm not sure of, as these are two different problems, with two very different solutions (if I guesses correctly): If you want your computation result ...


4

Netbeans' GUI builder is nice and other IDEs (Xcode and Visual Studio both come to mind) have similar features. However, while good productivity enhancers, if you want to learn build GUIs; you should design them by hand for the time being until you understand how they work.


3

1: I use IntelliJ (I'm biased as a prior JetBrains employee); other people use IntelliJ or Eclipse. I tried to use Eclipse and seriously disliked it. 2: Currently we use a custom closed-source tool. Before that, we all used IDEA and used its dependency control. Another team used Maven. 3: Currently there are custom build plugins for both IDEA and Eclipse, ...


3

A software package has two kinds of configuration: environment-specific configuration behaviour-specific configuration The former differs between the devel, test, stage and production environments. It should have at most 4 lines or so (web server base url, database connection string, SSL certificates, connection strings/urls to other related components, ...


3

A simple solution would be to keep all the configuration files in the repo and the have a build script that copies the correct version for the environment in when needed.


3

RMI is the standard for distributed object computing in Java. An EJB with a remote interface is an RMI object. RMI enables an application to obtain references to other objects located elsewhere in the network, and to invoke method on that object as though it where co-located with the client on the same JVM locally in client's virtual machine. On the server ...


3

R1. We use Eclipse or whatever, including IntelliJ Eclipse has "first class" support: we make sure that whatever changes we do in the development environment doesn't break anyone, and make sure the developer experience is as smooth as possible. It's also the IDE used for trainings. That said, people can use whatever environment they like, and we have a ...


3

Whether one IDE is more lightweight than another is pretty subjective. Do you have the identical features running etc? Even then it's not a like for like comparison. Couple of workarounds: The two IDEs both feature importers that will allow you to bounce projects back an forth - most of my projects run in all three major IDEs. You can performance tune ...


3

IMHO, Emacs is the best option. Writing an add-in for a real IDE will absolutely be easier to program and maintain, the problem is that the code is then trapped in that IDE. This forces you to pick the one IDE which will host your add-in. Which in turn, forces you to pick a host operating system. And programming language(s) for which people will use your ...


2

NetBeans vs Eclipse is a holy war question. I say this not because I think it's a bad question that should not be asked but because most of the time holy wars mean that the two pieces of software are equal enough that you should just pick one and start using it. Personally I've picked Eclipse since it was what was used at my last job and it's what I see used ...


2

Stock Vim is pretty well suited to C++ already. Just enable OmniCPPComplete and install ctags-exuberant or cscope (and optionally a tab-complete script), and you'll get all of the completion features you'll need. As a C++ programmer, that's all I ever actually need. (Though I do have a rather long indentexpr.)


2

I would also like to add IntelliJ in the IDE list which is also a good IDE for development. Although there are many other alternatives in IDE but I prefer and advise you to go with Eclipse. IMO Eclipse is best IDE for java development.


2

The way I always learned was by originally learning Swing from Sams Teach Yourself Java in 24 Hours, then I use netbeans' GUI builder simply to be able to copy over the Layout Code (in the GUI builder name all of your elements the same name as you name them in the regular code, and declare your one Swing elements by hand) once you get the hang of using ...


2

Invest in a version control system. Even the most basic one will give you a lot more than just keeping your project in sync, a full history of your code being the more notable feature. NetBeans, your IDE of choice, currently supports 5 different version control systems out of the box: Mercurial, Git, Subversion, CVS and ClearCase. Mercurial and Git are ...


2

All you need might be a conditional breakpoint. Both Netbeans and Eclipse allow you to edit properties of a breakpoint by right-clicking it and add a condition (a piece of code) that the debugger will evaluate every time it reaches the breakpoint, and stop only of the condition is true. In your case the condition would be some string that identifies the ...


1

If you are already a .Net shop and don't seem to have these same issues over there. My recommendation is to do what they are doing. My bet is, they have a known IDE version, with a known framework version across all machines. None of these problems are JAVA specific, although I will admit .NET has not quite embraced dependency management as well as the Java ...


1

Another approach is to move your Netbeans folder to the cloud. That's what I've done. First you need a Dropbox account, if you don't already have one. 2 free GB are more than enough for Netbeans usage. (Of course you can use Google Drive, OneDrive, etc. instead.) Next, create a folder, say, Dropbox\Netbeans and move your .netbeans config folder there. ...


1

Find and replace tools are generally pretty simple and not intended to be that robust. They are really for quick and dirty operations or to ease navigation, not for generating accurate metrics. If you need something like this you are likely going to have to find a way to create a regular expression, or create a script to run and find what you are looking ...


1

I use same vim setting for coding C, C++ and Python (and other stuff too like bash, make ..). You can change settings based on file type. I have a blog post explaining how to change indentation settings for Python and C code automatically in vim. The gist is autocmd BufNewFile,BufEnter *.{py} call set_python_settings() autocmd BufLeave *.{py} call ...


1

Have a look at this thread on Stack Overflow: "using both Eclipse and Netbeans on the same project". It's an old one but there are a few good tips about integration between Eclipse and Netbeans. Specifically there is a detailed solution (with XML code) to create an Eclipse project that can also be used by Netbeans. (I remembered it because a colleague used ...


1

you could easily separate the work into multiple projects and separate the team work so one team member only have to use one IDE at given time, also you should consider use different branches on your git repo and have a branch of common code with the models.



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