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IT depends on the frequency of the task in your hand. If it is going to be one time job, or let's say once in a year job, do not worry about the speed, reduce the complexity of your code (independent from the language you are planning to use). Otherwise, if such XML files are created every day / hour and require JSON conversion, I will even prefer C since ...


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Well, for such a "complex" project, i suggest that you split up your domains into smaller pieces, call it modules. Maybe it is easier to work with apis/resources instead of direct queries to the database. Let me explain this a bit. Let's assume you want a front end part and a backend part. The front-end and the backend talks over an API, in my case a REST ...


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This question probably doesn't belong to programmers but var request = function() { return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) { ... resolve(data); ... reject(err); } }; Is of course much slower than var request = promisify(function(callback) { ... callback(null, data); ... callback(err); }); However, ...


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I'd use node.js to initiate each of the tasks that need to be done, and I would manage your parallel sequencing of things with a promise library like Q. With Q, you can basically say: 1) Do all these things at the same time and let me know when you are done with all of them 2) Then, now that you've finished all those things, do something else either by ...


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It's about scheduling overhead, and about how some solutions fit specific problems better than others. Scheduling is the activity of deciding who is executing right now, and switching between processes/threads. Cooperative scheduling is simple to implement, and requires that each participating thread must yield to the scheduler when a sensible pause state ...


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All thing being equal, user space will have fewer layer of abstraction to work through. OS thread will require relatively slow calls through the kernel. User space, done correctly will avoid these abstractions. This results in the opportunity for higher performance.


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What you're describing is a reverse proxy. CORS allows cross-origin reading of resources, but it does not allow cross-origin iframe reads. However, if your reverse proxy serves permissive CORS headers (e.g., Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *), then the contents of your reverse proxy will be readable with an Ajax request. You simply need to make an Ajax request ...



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