Hot answers tagged

17

In the year 2000, Borland released the code to its InterBase database software as open source. For weird corporate politics reasons, they quickly walked it back and decided that further development of InterBase would continue as a proprietary product, as it had before, and they were able to do that. As noted above, they were the copyright holder and they ...


16

Is that possible with me as the original copyright holder (with no one having contributed changes except me)? Yes, of course. It's your code, you can do whatever you want with it. Even if I release my program as open source, I am the copyright holder after all, am I? Yes, of course. If you weren't, you wouldn't be able to release it as open source, ...


12

Why do we call Java open source, when development or contributions are not decentralized? The definition of "Open Source" provided by the Open Source Initiative makes no mention of accepting contributions, or how software should be developed. You can read it here: The OSI's "The Open Source Definition" page or the annotated version. Wikipedia (with some ...


7

As the original copyright holder and no one else holding the copyright to any portions of the project, you can choose to close-source a later version. You can also choose to change the license on previously released versions. It won't stop anyone from using the version(s) under the license they received it under, though.


2

When converting a program from one source language to another source language, you create a derivative work. It's the same principle than a translation into a foreign language of a book. Law is heavily dependent on your jurisdiction. But the general principle is: you need the authorisation of the copyright holder to create a derivative work. ...


2

The MIT license is a liberal license that basically says that you can do anything with the code that you want to, including making it closed source, translating it to another language, and so forth. The MIT License (MIT) Copyright (c) <year> <copyright holders> Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a ...


2

There are many, many things that need considering that might make an off-the-shelf solution problematic. Some of the most important ones are: completeness - does it do the job you need entirely, or are you going to be spending time learning its internals in order to extend it robustness - does it do its job well, without needing constant workarounds for ...


1

There are several questions and misunderstandings in your question. Let's address them one-by-one: Why do we call Java open source I have no idea. Java is a programming language. A programming language is a set of abstract mathematical rules and restrictions. It doesn't really make sense to apply the ideas of "open source" to a language, because there ...


1

Sure. The GPL. There are many companies that make money by providing services and support for an open-source project. The GPL insures that no other company can take the code private and turn it into a proprietary application. You can also go with a Dual-Licensing model, like Sencha does. The motivation for paying for a commercial license is that you don'...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible