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Disclaimer: this is my layman understanding. I am not involved or educated in anything like this. Consider my answer to be somewhat untrustworthy. I have no legal knowledge or training. This is fairly basic software forensics, which has plenty of overlap with software reverse engineering as far as the technical skill set is concerned. It is not sufficient ...


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In general you can't release an open source project if: it breaks a criminal law, it breaks intellectual property law and and intellectual rights (such as protected by patents) it contains copyrighted content part of it it's not your own work and it conflicts with other licenses it contains some sensitive data, but you can always encrypt it (e.g. using ...


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Can I make the source available only to those who bought the software? Yes. There are no (open-source) licenses that require you to provide the source code to just anybody. The most that is required is that you provide the source code to those people that have obtained a legitimate copy of the software itself. Can the customers give the source code ...


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Is there […] a specific open source license that combats this type of behaviour? No, there is no such license. And there cannot be. The ability to sell the software is a crucial part of the Open Source Definition. Any license that prohibits selling is by definition not Open Source. If I perhaps create and bundle a trademark inside my program, would ...


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I think you may be fighting a losing battle; I'm not sure how "I want to make my source code available to others to do more or less what they want to" (the definition of open source) is compatible with "I want to keep others from undercutting me on price." With that said, there are a few strategies that may or may not help: Trademark the product name, ...


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For example, if I wrote an open source Android game under the MIT license and some studio decides to put the game on the Play Store, without modification or my permission, and manage to sell thousands of copies, could I challenge them in court via some clause in the license I used or copyright law in general, and win? No, you could not. By licensing it ...


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Its problematic if you already work with others, rebase/tidy up your history of a branch where other participants work with and push it afterwards to a public repository. Other participants of your project will have major problems. See -> this explanation But you work alone so far. There will be no problems if you publish your repository now. You will get ...



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