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1

First of all you need to worry about legalities only if you wish to distribute your code. If it is for personal use or for an internal app for your organization you can go ahead and make any changes and integration you wish. And even if you want to distribute your code, what you need to do is fine by GPLv2. To quote from the license ...


2

If the contributors of changes agree to a Contributor License Agreement (CLA), then the project owner holds all of the copyright. In essence, contributors can be asked to give up their rights to own the contributions. They may continue to receive credit for their contributions, but depending on the wording of the agreement, may cause them to assign copyright ...


-1

If your code is a derived work of the GPL code it must be released. If your code incorporates the GPL code, modified or not, it is (almost certainly) a derived work. The question is a little different if the database wrapper is an LGPL library.


2

IANAL. Though there may be no license-induced obligation, it sure seems like plagiarism to me, if your friend claims, or implies by omission, that the translation is original work. This site says (applicable more generally to text, doesn't mention source code, though on the other hand, source code is (copyrighted) text): If you translate somebody ...


2

In general, the principle is that you cannot revoke the GPL license, once it is applied to a particular version of a software. If you choose to release your software under a new version using a different license, you're certainly free to do that, but all older releases of the code would still fall under the GPL.


3

Disclaimer: this is not legal advice. It's only a personal opinion from an IT professional. For legal advice you shall consult a lawyer or qualified legal expert. Legal aspects wary very much from country to country. In the European Union for example, the functionality of a programme and a programming language can't be protected per copyright, as this ...


2

I don't know where else to ask this. Like so many questions like this, the answers are easy to find. The Apache license is written in plain English. A native English speaker should be able to read it (carefully) and understand it. (But you >>do<< need to read it >>carefully<< ... and research any points you are not sure about.) There ...


2

The Apache License is a permissive license. It basically lets you do pretty much anything you want, as long as you tell people you used the software, and that it was Apache Licensed. [I]f part of my application uses code I did not write ... under the Apache 2.0 license, am I not allowed to charge for my app? No, it is perfectly ok to charge for your app. ...


3

The license that you describe does not meet the Open Source Initiative's definition of open source. According to that definition, an open source license can not restrict someone who selling a software product. You won't find an existing open-source license that meets your criteria. However, if you hire a lawyer with the appropriate expertise, you can have ...


4

What benefits brings Java-9 over your current Java-8 version ? I mean to the person using your library. Deploying two concurrent version of the same library has a LOT of downsides. Do you need to keep the API compatible between the two ? you will also have to maintain the code twice, fix the bugs twice as inevitably the code will bear some difference. ...



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