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3

The Apache website's license FAQ has a very good non-laywer summary of what the license actually means. The part that's relevant to your question is this: It forbids you to: redistribute any piece of Apache-originated software without proper attribution; use any marks owned by The Apache Software Foundation in any way that might state or ...


1

If you create you program so that it loads the image at run-time (it is not linked): the user of the program must be able to change the image (customisation), if not then it is linked. Then the program should not be affected, it would be like an image viewer, it is not affected by the images that it views. I am not a lawyer. Please read the licence, and ...


3

The basic question is: does your code, or the creation of it, in any way rely on that particular image. If you somehow derived your code from the image, then your code would be a derived work and you would have to publish your code under the CC-BY-SA license. However, and this is more usual, if the image is just something that gets displayed in the context ...


1

About Impact.ttf Based on your question, you can find information about Impact.ttf from Microsoft site itself. See Impact.ttf 2.3 and Impact.ttf 5.0. The font isn't a copy right with Microsoft either. It just tells you that following Microsoft products are using this font, and they would have contractually worked out the mutual license to it. The font is ...


2

This is indeed a great question. And the reason why it is great because it moves mere copyright domain to intellectual property domain. And the moment you talk about IP - there is no one way right! OK - in a nutshell let me rephrase this so that I know that I have understood right! Basically there are two pieces of software one is client and one is server. ...


9

There are basically two ways to handle this. Either hand it off to someone else, (which apparently is not an option here,) or simply post something on the project site and on "various channels" that you'll be unavailable for a while. There really isn't much you can do beyond that.


0

You can fork the project on github and then make a single commit with your change. Then you can open an issue in the project repository and provide a link to the commit and ask if (s)he would like you to make a PR. Try to follow any code style being used and use travis etc if the project is. It is always good to include a test if appropriate.


2

As an owner of an open source project, I love hearing from potential contributors. Since you're interested in contributing, I'm guessing you also have some issue with the current software, either a bug you'd like to fix or a feature you'd like to add. Open an issue and then in a comment on the issue, express interest and willingness to do the work. If the ...


3

Since your issue is a missing contribution statement, and it's on Github which supports issue tracking, you could open an issue to politely ask for support. Something like: Issue title: Contribution guidelines Issue description: I was looking for ways to contribute to your project, but I cannot find any guidelines on how to do so. If you're accepting ...


0

If you are the copyright holder, you can do whatever you like. That's because the only one who can sue you for a license violation is the copyright holder, and if you are the copyright holder, unless you are schizophrenic, nobody can sue you. If you use the GPL license, you have three choices: One, you can accompany every copy that you distribute with the ...


4

Integration work is boring, repetitive and never-ending. It takes huge amounts of resources to validate your code works with all the versions of your collaborators that you don't have installed. To do it properly, you need environments with each of them installed (or at least easily reproducable). This requires a lot of machines and a lot of work managing ...


1

Generally speaking, you should not be modifying the source code files of third party code unless they're the type of changes for which it would make sense to contribute them back upstream (e.g. bug fixes). Obviously, there are exceptional situations where you may wish to go ahead and modify those files anyway, but you usually want to avoid forking the ...



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