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1

A message like "This app uses various projects released under license XXXX" is displayed on the app website. No notice is present inside the application... It’s moot whether BSD licenses allow that, but I could not imagine how the following clause from both MIT licenses (Expat and X11) could be read to make that possible: The above copyright ...


2

Most OSS licenses don't try to precisely prescribe what is expected, as they cannot reasonably know what environment they run in. After all, the freedom to run FOSS code in many environments is a fundamental part of what it means to be FOSS code. Instead, there's usually a clause that relies on implicit or contextual norms. For instance, the requirement ...


0

The exact terms vary from license to license, but most licenses require that the copyright message is somewhere where the end-user can find them. You can not assume that a regular end-user visits your website. And it is even less reasonable to assume that a regular end-user will unpack the APK file to look for the license files. Android end devices usually ...


5

The license is intended to protect your copyright and interests, not to take them away. As the only author of the library, you are free to relicense it under whichever scheme you wish, including for usage in commercial products. Indeed, it's not that uncommon. For instance, PolarSSL is released under GPLv2, but a license can be bought for usage in closed ...


1

When choosing an open-source solution, it's useful if the solution has a well-known corporate backer. For example, Angular is backed by Google. As misguided as they are, one of the reasons people ask questions like "What frontend Javascript UI framework is the most popular" is because they want to know that others have used the product successfully, and ...


2

IANAL, this is not legal advise. If you want to be sure, talk to a lawyer. If you are offering a web-service that appears to be a single product, then it is likely that your users will treat it as such, regardless of how it is technically realized. This means that if a sufficiently interested user tries to download the source of the site (to exercise his ...


2

Note: for any non-open-source code on github, you can still fork it - at least on github. This is useful because many of us will see the title "code with no license ... can I fork it?" and come here wondering about github. (I did not reproduce the words "open source" in the question text for the reasons mentioned in other answers.) This minimal license is ...


0

If your windows (pages) are from the same domain (origin), localStorage can be used to share data and to broadcast messages. One thing you should consider is that each browser window (page) works in a separate thread. So, if we are talking about cross-window communication, we are also talking about multithreading. You should also consider some localStorage ...


3

Most O/RM frameworks provide a means to initialize and seed a database. Via Code. For example, Entity Framework allows you to create a custom database initializer and implement a seed method to provide seed data (If you just want to have it generate the database, creating a seed function is not necessary). If you're not using an O/RM, you can use the ...


6

I would do a separation between the schema of your database and the actual initial content. For a simple and small application, you could create a schema.sql and a seed.sql. The schema holds all the statements to create the database and its tables. The seed contains INSERT statements. If you want to go one step further, seed the database through your code. ...


-2

Yes, use GitHub, it is the most popular and well-used. Have a public repo where you encourage people to commit on the beta branch. Don't have too many branches where it gets confusing or unmanageable. Instead, if you want to see new versions of the framework, encourage them to fork it. You could consider consolidating your alpha and beta branches. Good luck! ...


1

There are many different approaches, and it depends both on your application and on your team's personality. Here is a good summary of a few branching workflows in Git: http://sethrobertson.github.io/GitBestPractices/#workflow The link there labelled "Git-flow branching model" is a very popular approach. However, there are some who think that all the ...


8

In your case, the particular software you are using is licensed under "GPLv2 or any later version," which can be included in GPLv3-licensed code. If the code you wanted to use were using GPLv2 only, then it would not be legally possible to include that code in your GPLv3-licensed distribution. We can consult the inter-GPL-compatibility table from the FSF's ...


2

You never need to publish anything with the (A)GPL. You only ever need to make available the source code to those persons to whom you also make available a binary (and with the AGPL also to those users whom you let use your binary over the network).


7

This is covered in the FAQ for the AGPL: Q: How does this license treat commercial enterprise use over intranets and internal networks? A: Simply, if run internally to a commercial company, then the company isn't required to release source code back to the world. The license requires that if a user downloads the source they have the right to make ...



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