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3

The purpose of a copyright notice is not to establish who owns the copyright, but that anyone copying the work knew who owned it. i.e. if you do what you propose you could be taken to court for copyright infringement, where the owner of the copyright would be established by other means than just looking at the notice (usually by some means of establishing ...


0

A different approach is the one used by Google Docs. When multiple users work on the same document, every person has her own view of the document and can modify different parts of the document in parallel. The changes are propagated through WebSockets to all users, making it possible to view the changes in real time. The model itself predates Google Docs by ...


3

After doing some legwork, downloading the last package that was available for the library the only licensing information I found was in the PKG-INFO file: License: PSF or ZPL Which makes me believe you can choose either. After 10 years of neglect, efforts to contact the author may not go well, but it's worth attempting any obvious action you can. ...


0

It's possible with dual licensing. RavenDB (and others) have a similar model where their main OSS project is AGPL, but dev does not require a license, and commercial customers pay for a commercial license. Also, OSS projects can get an exception to allow their OSS license to not be potentially swallowed up by the AGPL. MongoDB instead publishes client ...


1

You can look to the W3C specifications as an example. They describe a small syntax of their own which means you can implement the HTML5 spec in any language: https://www.w3.org/TR/html5/ Another good example to look at are descriptions of algorithms and data structures which have a small syntax of only necessary components and leave the implementation ...


6

Nearly all of the reasonably well known open-source licenses contain a disclaimer of liability for the result of anything that's done with the software. For example, the Boost license includes: IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS OR ANYONE DISTRIBUTING THE SOFTWARE BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ...


1

The people who are paying decide what happens. If this is an open source project run by volunteer developers the developers decide. If this bug hasn't been reported again then there is nobody who will notice when it's fixed. So it's pointless to waste time trying to fix it. At least nobody's going to waste their time to do what you want.


5

It helps to prevent the developers/contributors from wasting their time on issues that nobody cares about. If nobody "has the exact same Wine version, specs, application and manages to reproduce the problem" then it's probably not really an issue. The developers probably don't really care if the problem was fixed, they only care if it still affects anyone. ...


1

Remove distraction? There are some issues (not necessarily bugs?) that are really minor, and most people simply don't care about it (that's why it existed for such a long time!). In a large list of issues, such minor issues may simply get forgotten. Sometimes it may even have been fixed without anybody noticing. After all you can still reopen it if you think ...


6

Now that I'm updating/maintaining what is effectively a new version, how do I correctly give attribution to the original author? Here's something I often see in similar situations: Copyright 2016 - Project101, written by ndtreviv, based on Project100, originally written by RandomDude24 Replace links to the github.io page for the original project to ...


3

I would just try to be explicit about what is the original work, and what are your additions. Don't "mascarade" original code as yours (this would be "stealing" and is bad). First, if possible, make most of your changes in new source files (where you add your name -or your employer if you are working- as copyright holder). Then you might add comments for ...


3

The GPL license is written in such a way that you are not allowed to use GPL-licensed code in a product unless the users of the product have the same rights that are granted by applying the GPL license. This is even the case if only a small portion of the complete product is actually licensed under the GPL. Due to this "infectious" nature of the GPL, if you ...



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