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11

The license means nothing at all, and gives you no rights to use the software or copy the code. Given the way copyright law works in most countries (author has copyright by default, and "you can't do anything with this" is the default consequence of copyright), this means you're technically not allowed to copy the code (including cloning the repository). ...


5

The point of open spource software is that you can do all the things you describe. However, do not try to mislead people into thinking that your code is the original project. If your version is better, users will notice that and your program will slowly eclipse the original - this has happened countless times before. (If it isn't, then you don't deserve ...


0

Open source is about licensing (with a free software license) and about community of developers. Licensing is related to copyright (and you copyright some source code, not some design ideas or architecture). If you rewrite entirely some software yourself on your own time, the resulting source code is entirely yours, and you could even make that proprietary ...


4

There are two separate copyrights in play when you contribute to an open-source project. There's the copyright on your individual contribution, and then there's a copyright on the entire collective work of the piece of software. Additionally, there's the general issue of whether a copyright notice is required to satisfy the terms of the law or the terms of ...


-1

Talking about strict liability regarding licensing, the safest option would likely be the MIT license: The MIT License (MIT) Copyright (c) Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including ...


4

License and copyright are two very different things. GPL, in general, makes sure that any derivative works are still GPL. If you add new code to code that is GPL, that will still be GPL, but you have the copyright to the new code, and can put that into a copyright notice in your files (and you should do that). That will not do much for you, except that ...


1

First of all you need to worry about legalities only if you wish to distribute your code. If it is for personal use or for an internal app for your organization you can go ahead and make any changes and integration you wish. And even if you want to distribute your code, what you need to do is fine by GPLv2. To quote from the license ...


2

If the contributors of changes agree to a Contributor License Agreement (CLA), then the project owner holds all of the copyright. In essence, contributors can be asked to give up their rights to own the contributions. They may continue to receive credit for their contributions, but depending on the wording of the agreement, may cause them to assign copyright ...


-1

If your code is a derived work of the GPL code it must be released. If your code incorporates the GPL code, modified or not, it is (almost certainly) a derived work. The question is a little different if the database wrapper is an LGPL library.



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