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You're mostly on the right track. The stack's purpose in general is to hang onto data you'll need later. Most of the time, that's done when calling subroutines, at the very least to save the return address, but also to save any state that may be destroyed otherwise and as a mechanism to store local variables and to pass parameters. In most multitasking ...


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The stack has nothing to do with multi-threading. The stack saves information about a subroutine. When I say sub-routine, I am not speaking about any particular language, but the process of making a call to another area of the program space, and returning from that area when finished. When making the call, the currently executing routine may be using ...


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DUP is a specific operand specifier to the DB/DW/etc psuedo-instructions, telling them to repeat a specific value. It can only be used in these data instructions. TIMES is a generic instruction prefix, telling the assembler to produce multiple copies of the instruction (or psuedo-instruction), whatever it may be. AFAIK, TIMES is specific to NASM, ...


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The real answer is Money. There's not enough perceived benefit of a high level language OS to justify spending the resources to build one and then push it into the mainstream. There's massive cost involved in building a new driver for each piece of hardware it needs to support, for example. There are various OSes written in high level languages, with the ...



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