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A fat binary approach makes most sense if: Both architectures coexist on the same system Everything else is more or less the same for all architectures That's why they are not used for cross-platform code (both criteria don't apply), or to support different Linux distributions with one binary (1. doesn't apply, 2. applies to a certain degree). On ...


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Internet age distribution logistics disincentivizes fat binaries in two ways: The point of sale does not involve physical goods and therefore favor fewer skews as is the case when products compete for retail shelf space and customers have limited opportunities to make a purchase. The costs of bandwidth favors delivering just the minimum necessary bits for ...


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Part of the reasons why fat binaries did not succeed is that there is more than the ABI & processor (actually, instruction set) specifications to invalidate a binary executable. A binary executable often depends a lot on other resources, in particular dynamic libraries (see the DLL hell), external services (think of DBMS like PostGreSQL ....), system ...


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My experience is that beyond having a Makefile (or sometimes cmake :-(), it varies according to the personal tastes of the individual. Personally, I use a editor that runs from the command line (xterm), and have editor macros (created over a couple of decades) that more or less imitate many of the features of an IDE without the baggage. For instance, one ...


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At least for free software on Linux, you usually use some builder like make. You could use some other builder program, like scons or omake For some (mostly historical) reasons, the Makefile may be generated by utilities like autoconf or cmake; these generators also deal with configuration issues (e.g. they disable some features of the software if a ...


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Level 0 is the digital logic level, or basically all of the circuitry. Operations are on-off switches, data types are boolean values and numbers. Features are logic gates, clocks, traces, semiconductor wafers, and so forth. The machine language is simple binary. Level 1 is the Micro-Architecture level. If you look at a micro photograph of the die in an ...


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Q1 In the first step, we're NOT using DMA, so the content of the disk controller is read piece by piece by the processor. The processor will of course (assuming the data is actually going to be used for something, and not just being thrown away) store it in the memory of the system. The buffer in this case is a piece of memory on the hard-disk ...


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This is not an answer; it is a request for clarification that's too long to fit in the comments. Before anyone can answer this question, one has to explain clearly the computer system architecture that is being discussed. Namely: What are the bus systems involved in this description? Most computer systems have a memory bus. Most computers have other ...



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