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1

I recommend you this website: OSDev Wiki It is a very fine page that gives you great introductions to the very basics of an operating system as well as a lot of example codes to even write your own OS. It might be a little-low level but besides the very detailed descriptions there are also some general explanations on this topic. Imho it is a great source ...


1

If not then what's the use for BIOS routines? To get a kernel running properly you need to load it (and possibly other things - drivers, "init RAM disk", etc) from somewhere (disk, CD, network) into memory. The kernel will also need various pieces of information (e.g. a physical memory map) and may want some pieces of hardware configured a certain way ...


0

How does a Kernel provides different functionality to OS? The OS would access kernel functionality via a system call interface. In the x86 architecture the int instruction takes an interrupt number as an argument which it uses to generate a software interrupt to which an interrupt handler will respond to. The kernel would have its own interrupt ...


0

First, the BIOS (which is specific to PCs; most other computers, notably servers & tablets, have different firmware) is hardly used these days, except to boot the operating system kernel (and also for some weird things like ACPI & SMI), usually through some boot loader like GRUB (but both Windows and MacOSX have their own boot loaders). 32 bits (or ...


2

I think the other answers provide a wide spectrum of reasons as to why operating systems do not rely on relational databases internally/exclusively so I'll just share an interesting piece of information that I once stumbled upon. Apparently, there are technologies that allow you to mount relational databases as file systems when their use is justified. ...


2

The main function of any OS is to facilitate interactions between applications, hardware and the users. So.. why don't Windows/Linux OS use relational Databases (RDBMS)? This is a question of biblical proportions, but the short answer is: There is not any real benefit to be gained from using a complex structure such as an rdbms as a file system. ...


10

The real reason is a lack of need for it. Layering databases on top of files, rather than merging them, handles the vast majority of situations at least as well as a merged solution with substantially reduced complexity. In some situations others have mentioned, we've also layered parts of files on top of databases (such as permissions structures). In that ...


17

Although this is opinion-based, I think it's just another historical artifact. Early OSes used a simple file system design for performance that was reasonably strongly tied to the characteristics of the hardware available at the time, and it's been the same way ever since. It's difficult to change the old file read/write APIs for more transactional ...


51

Today, most database management systems (e.g. PostGreSQL, MongoDB, etc...) internally keep their data inside OS files (in the past, some DBMSs used raw disk partitions directly). On recent computers still using spinning hard disks, the disk is so slow - relative to the CPU or the RAM - that adding a few software layers is not relevant. SSD technology might ...



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