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5

Short answer: no. Long answer: I assume when you write "size" of an object, you mean size (in bytes) of the member variables, and when you write "complexity", you mean number of members, number of different types used, and so on. Access to an object through a member function will result in IL code which contains pushing the parameters of the method to ...


1

My organization has dealt with this exact problem. Our products are in the video space, but much of the code we write is image processing that would work for still images, too. We "solved" (or maybe "dealt with") the problem by writing our own compiler. This isn't quite as crazy as it sounds at first. It's got a restricted set of inputs. We know that all ...


-1

I've done assembly programming in the past, not SIMD programming recently. Have you consider using a SIMD-aware compiler like Intel's? Is A Guide to Vectorization with IntelĀ® C++ Compilers interesting? Several of your comments like "balloon-popping" suggest using a compiler (to get benefits throughout if you don't have a single hot-spot).


-1

It doesn't seem to add too much maintenance overhead if you consider using a higher-level language: Vector<float> values = GetValues(); Vector<float> increment = GetIncrement(); // Perform addition as a vector operation: List<float> result = (values + increment).ToList(); vs List<float> values = GetValues(); List<float> ...


4

I did not write much SIMD code for myself, but a lot of assembler code some decades ago. AFAIK using SIMD intrinsics is essentially assembler programming, and your whole question could be rephrased just by replacing "SIMD" by the word "assembly". For example, the points you already mentioned, like the code takes 10x to 100x to develop than "high level ...


3

(Disclaimer: I do not work on server-side backends, and I do not have any IT operational experience. My answer below is only from architectural theory and not from experience.) If you are unsure of what to do, try the following order of precedence. (The first two steps has nothing to do with GC, but if those two aren't taken care of, talking about GC ...


5

When your project experiences performance problems. You can fine tune the garbage collection algorithm used, how often to run it - depending on you performance requirements. Let's say you have lots of RAM on your server but not too much CPU power, then you want to delay garbage collector as much as possible to night time for example. And so on.


0

From a different perspective, it is my experience that most programmers/developers do not plan for success and the "prototype" is almost always becomes Release 1.0. I have first hand experience with 4 separate original products in which the classy, sexy, and highly functional front-end (basically the UI) resulted in wide-spread user adoption and enthusiasm. ...


1

The question can be reworded as "I have the canonical perfect application for a nosql key-value store, what should I do?". Yes, this can be done with sql, but a nosql implementation is likely to be more efficient. Look at systems like riak, apache cassandra, berkeley db or memcachedb, or if you're planning on deploying to amazon web services dynamodb. Or ...


0

You may want to consider not using SQL at all, but use something like Azure table storage. Troy Hunt has an interesting article on its performance on huge datasets: http://www.troyhunt.com/2014/12/applied-azure-infographic-of-how-have-i.html


3

You might use three total tables (adjust table/column names and SQL dialect to taste). The first is the user table, which contains the master list of user_id's. The second is the folder table, that will contain a list of folders for users. | folders | |------------------| | id (int) | | user_id (int) | | name (varchar) | And a ...


5

Initial response Some preliminary matters: As a practical matter I find it's helpful to throw in date fields for created/modified times; it makes your life much easier when debugging data problems. Pretty much any table that's not a lookup table would benefit from it. If a table is write-once, consider foregoing the modified time column. Be sure that ...


0

This sort of spatial query is routinely handled by spatially enabled databases like mysql, postgres, oracle and sql server. I'm sure there are others I'm leaving out. The search then becomes a sql query using whatever geometry type is defined for your database. The particular topic you're interested in is called a nearest neighbor query. Check out this ...



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