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36

There is a good practice where you are "liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send". In other words, if there is a chance (however small it will be) that someone will give you a cr line ending (and expect it to work correctly) , you'll need to support it. TBH, I can't see how adding CR support would take all that long. When you see a cr ...


21

No. CR is not obsolete (defined as "no longer produced or used"). You yourself have provided evidence of that. It is perhaps uncommon, but not obsolete. As for "is it safe to exclude support" for CR? As you say, it's not a matter of losing sales, and you can't support every weird character combination and file format in the world, and only you know your ...


18

About laziness: you have to balance: effort in changing code so that CR is safely handled (and then forget about it). effort in explaining to users why the files they were happy with for decades suddenly crash your app, in finding workarounds that they can use without compromising your sales and in asking for arguments and anwsering to comments right here. ...


15

Linux I think you would want to use a Linux based OS for Developing Android applications seeing as how Android is a Linux Based OS, it's open source, it's free, and can run on a partition next to windows, and I think Mac Os as well (don't quote me on that though). it's been a while since I opened up eclipse on my Linux box but I remember it being fairly ...


14

I've been using emacs for the last 10 years (from and to), and I can only say that you are absolutely right. Back in the days, I used gnus and the w3 browser, but clearly they are no longer up to it when compared to dedicated programs. But, obviously, you cannot run Chrome in text mode so this is where emacs wins. And even there, I'd rather use lynx/elinks ...


10

Xamarin doesn't "target" Windows, because there is no point - whatever you write in C#, is ready to run on Windows in and of itself. That's why they're only selling licences for Xamarin.Android, Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Mac. But what would a Xamarin.Windows abstraction layer be supposed to do? That would be a textbook snake oil product :) "Native Windows ...


8

Is it safe to exclude support for the statistically insignificant percentage of users who decide (for whatever reason) to the old Mac OS style line-endings? Maybe not too many users will detect it, but there's an elephant in the room: Windows line endings (CRLF). If you support those (I generally do, even though I only use Windows for games), it should be ...


7

You should definitely use a SCM system, even when only working on one machine. Which one you use is not that important. I would also recommend keeping the working directories on the two machines separate rather than using a directory shared across the network. Less chance for cluttering your environment, and allows you to work when the network is unavailable ...


7

When you get into time-limited trials and sending clients "unlock codes", those are really digital licensing and copy protection. There are lots of options for that, and there's no one "Best way". It sounds like your programmer hasn't done this kind of thing before, and it's the sort of thing you can spend a lot of time and money on, and still get wrong (as ...


7

I don't even use the built-in therapist that much, but I do use Emacs and I like it, not because of it's comprehensive nature but because it is endlessly configurable and powerful as a text editor. Also I know a lot of the keystrokes for it. Successful text editing is all about the keystrokes. If you want to develop your productivity with it, Steve Yegge ...


6

There are many serial devices that rely on CR as an end to the data stream before the ETX is sent. It is a convention that will never go away.


5

Emacs was never intended for the mass market. It is designed for efficient use by people who have taken the time to learn how it works. That said, one size does not fit all, so you may not like emacs even after you learn more about it. EDIT: My two favorite features of emacs besides editing text are the shell mode, and gnus. After getting frustrated with ...


5

The bsdiff utility should come with OSX. If that can't work for you, there are other binary diff tools. However, with the advent of high bandwidth connections, the practice of distributing binary patches is becoming much less common. You can just as easily distribute a complete updated version of your program if need be.. FURTHER: A [good] module ...


4

I'm not a mac person but I ran into your same situation a while back. I used Mercurial with Dropbox. Basically, I had my repository in Dropbox and had both machines configured to work through that folder. Alternatively, you could use BitBucket or Github to achieve a similar thing.


4

You'll have to recode the UI no matter what. The OS X UI is different enough to the iOS UI to mean that any lesser attempt at porting the UI direct (such as the one mentioned by Chiron) is going to result in a less than perfect compromise. For instance: OS X users expect there to be a set of menus on the menu bar through which you can access most of ...


4

Windows NT was specifically designed to support multiple OS "personalities". In fact, it originally wasn't even intended to be a drop-in replacement for Windows and DOS, it was intended as a drop-in replacement for OS/2! On Windows NT, applications aren't written against the NT kernel, instead they are written against an OS personality, which in turn sits ...


3

Both Windows and OS X support Java at the moment, but in the long term I heard that Apple will be dropping Java support on OS X. Edit It seems that Oracle will provide direct support for Java on OS X.


3

Related terms "Gold Master" and "gone gold" are used frequently in the Games Industry. The Urban Dictionary has a nice definition and a possible explanation for the genesis of these terms: The term itself comes from the old practice of recordable CDs being manufactured with gold film. Hence the gold colored CD actually being the source, with no reference ...


3

I can't really answer your question but I may suggest a new route. Have a look at Chameleon Project: If you're an iOS developer, you're already familiar with UIKit, the framework used to create apps for the iPhone, iPod and iPad. Chameleon is a drop in replacement for UIKit that runs on Mac OS X. In many cases, your iOS code doesn't need to change at ...


3

Well, you could use a DataMapper (often called "object relational mappers") to provide persistence services to your application. LinQ-To-SQL basically is a DataMapper, too. Good DataMappers are for example NHibernate and Subsonic, which can be used with a variety of databases. Microsoft also introduced the ADO.NET Entity Framework a few years ago, which has ...


3

I would treat the request as any feature request where you need to weigh the costs against the benefits. If exactly one person has asked for CR support, maybe it is not necessary. See the below book chapter from 37 signals where they say you should only worry about very popular feature requests. http://gettingreal.37signals.com/ch05_Forget_Feature_Requests....


3

An app will not be rejected only because it has a fixed window size. Although such a design choice could result in an inferior useabity. And that could be a reason for refusal.


3

If you're using GitHub as your central Git repository, you could take a look at Travis CI. It's a cloud-based CI system, so you don't have to manage the server yourself. I'm thinking of trying this out for some of my open-source projects. If you want to stick with Apple's tools all the way, try out Bots. It ships as part of Xcode Server. I've been ...


3

It is not MacOSX, it is the compiler that you use on it. So, simply upgrade your compiler, perhaps by building from their source code a recent version of Clang/LLVM and/or GCC compiler(s). (you don't need permission from Apple to compile and use a newer compiler. You just need to take time to read and follow the build instructions; in a few hours you can ...


2

Using SCM is a good practice, it naturally provides for backup in case one machine goes down. Also, it helps in those scenarios where you want to change something in code and test it, but want a clean copy at hand in case it bombs. I have personally used two dev machines to work on two different bugs in parallel. Without the work on either of them affect the ...


2

You'll probably find that the majority of people that did not upgrade, are also not installing new applications and only use the ones they already have. Depending on what your application is going to do, it may even be much more difficult to develop it to support older systems and at the same time work on newer systems according to the newer system ...


2

There is a pretty obvious approach here -- survey your customers and figure out what they are using and perhaps why they are stuck to that version. Upgrading OSX is relatively less painful than upgrading windows, I know lots of folks don't do it until there is something they need that the later version can handle that their version can't. Aside from that I'...


2

I think you should consider the complete list of 3rd party tools you'll be needing. Android, Java, Eclipse, VCS (at least bzr, git, svn) should not be a problem. For example I have an Android project which has a small python scripting part in it too, and I could not get libxml working on Mac OS X, even though it's working out of the box on Windows or Linux.



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